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Petals on the Wind (Dollanganger, No. 2) Paperback – June 1, 1989


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--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 439 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket (June 1, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671682881
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671682880
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 4.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (392 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,860,730 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'An artfully twisted modern fairytale' The Times Magazine 'Beautifully written, macabre and thoroughly nasty... it is evocative of the nasty fairy tales like Little Red Riding Hood and The Babes in the Wood, with a bit of Victorian Gothic thrown in. ... What does shine through is her ability to see the world through a child's eyes' Daily Express 'Makes horror irresistible' Glasgow Sunday Mail 'A gruesome saga... the storyline is compelling, many millions have no wish to put this down' Ms London 'There is strength in her books - the bizarre plots matched with the pathos of the entrapped' The Times --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

V.C. Andrews® has been a bestselling phenomenon since the publication of Flowers in the Attic, which was followed by four more Dollanganger family novels: Petals on the Wind, If There Be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday, and Garden of Shadows. Since then, readers have been captivated by more than seventy novels in V.C. Andrews’s bestselling series, which have sold more than 106 million copies and have been translated into more than twenty-five foreign languages. --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

More About the Author

One of the most popular authors of all time, V.C. Andrews has been a bestselling phenomenon since the publication of her spellbinding classic Flowers in the Attic. That blockbuster novel began her renowned Dollanganger family saga, which includes Petals on the Wind, If There Be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday, and Garden of Shadows. Since then, readers have been captivated by more than fifty novels in V.C. Andrews' bestselling series. The thrilling new series featuring the March family continues with Scattered Leaves, forthcoming from Pocket Books. V.C. Andrews' novels have sold more than one hundred million copies and have been translated into sixteen foreign languages.

Customer Reviews

Just finished reading the book and what an ending it was.
Erika D. Smith
I am so glad I decided to read this series...the movie did this book no justice at all.
Amazon Customer
I loved this story that will make you cry to see how life can change so much.
Diane

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Justice on April 23, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Somehow, this book is even creepier than Flowers in the Attic. It's not as good, but it's a very entertaining read. After the abuse that the surviving Foxworth children suffered, readers will want to know if they can ever lead a normal life. It's a good examination of how a family might deal with the legacy of abuse if they've finally escaped from the perpetrators. Will they try to forgive and continue with their lives? Will they become obsessed with revenge? Or will they find themselves completely incapable of continuing with their lives because they were utterly emotionally destroyed?

Each of the children deals with the trauma in different ways. While Chris appears to have recovered the best, his obsession with his own sister is the most startling and enduring result of his isolation during the "Attic" years. He does not "give up" waiting for his sister to respond to him romantically. Predictably, Carrie, who never really had a chance to enjoy life on the "outside", and who lost her twin at such a young age, is the most drastically scarred of the children and her story is the saddest and most tragic. She remains emotionally and physically stunted.

For her, Cathy, and Chris, we remain riveted to the story and want to know what happens, because we suffered with them in "Flowers" and cried for little Cory. Now we want to know what happens to them even if a lot of the plot and secondary characters are boring and one-dimensional. I liked Henny,the warm nurse who cannot speak; even if one literary critic suggested the large black woman was reminiscent of "Aunt Jemima", I don't think that's fair. I think Andrews wrote her as a sensitive and intelligent woman, and including her gave us some respite from everyone in the story having "flaxen hair and cerulean eyes".
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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful By WonderingShojo on August 25, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Flowers in the Attic" was my first step into this genre, and I found it one of the best books I've read. I looked to "Petals on the Wind" with great anticipation, but a short ways in, my enjoyment nearly flatlined.
Bad points of the story:
The story jumps around a bit too much, and what there is of the story seems to be too many people trying to get into Cathy's tutu. It seems half the time she's sobbing, a word used a bit too often throughout the book. And if she's not sobbing, someone is gripping her to them and telling her how exquisitely beautiful she is and that she belongs to him. Another annoying habit in the story is the placing of an exclamation mark behind Chris' name, as if Cathy is surprised her brother actually shows up. Chris himself doesn't seem to have much personality outside of studying and trying to convince his sister that his love for her isn't wrong, and if it is, oh well. Through some pieces of the story you have to wonder if Cathy left her brain in the attic. At one point I was so disappointed in Catherine, I really didn't want to finish the story, as she thought to herself "Life seemed to me nothing without a man." Lastly, I felt there was excess character killing, with eight deaths (that I counted) throughout the story.
Good points of the story:
Carrie gets some more attention in the story, but it's mostly bittersweet. The only real redeeming part of the story was settled in the last fifty or so pages, with an excellent revenge set loose on the mother and grandmother. Which almost makes the rest of the story worth reading.
In conclusion:
Between "I sobbed.", "You're beautiful. You belong to me!" and "Chris!", the author manages to create a mildly entertaining story. But if I had it to do over again, I would have stopped at "Flowers in the Attic" and let my prior image of Cathy's character be.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 26, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
After three years, four months, and sixteen days, Cathy, Chris, and Carrie Dollanganger have escaped Foxworth Hall. "Petals on the Wind" begins with the three children on a bus destined for Florida. However, their travels are cut short because of Carrie's poor health. They are assisted by a mute woman (Henrietta Beech) who takes them to her boss, Dr. Paul Sheffield, their soon-to-be guardian.
The three children have a new chance at a "normal" childhood. They attend school, and Cathy and Chris even begin pursuing their personal goals: Cathy joins a ballet school; Chris later enters medical school.
At her ballet practices, Cathy meets Julian Marquet, the son of her instructor. He is attracted to Cathy and pursues her until she agrees to marry him. All the while, Cathy is torn between these three men: her older brother Chris who never abandoned his love for her since they left Foxworth Hall; her much older guardian Paul who becomes her first lover; and Julian, her abusive new husband, who she married out of desperation rather than love. One of them fathers her first son Jory.
Carrie, on the other hand, doesn't have as much success as her older siblings. She's constantly teased by her classmates because of her short size and large head, which makes her become more withdrawn and miserable. Then one last encounter with her mother leaves Carrie on the brink of suicide.
Throughout the book, Cathy strikes out at Corrine, trying to ruin her mother's life any way she can. At the height of her revenge, Cathy steals her mother's husband away from her, becomes pregnant by him with her second son (Bart Jr), and publicly announces her imprisonment in Foxworth Hall.
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