Qty:1
$94.00 + Free Shipping
In stock. Usually ships within 3 to 4 days.
Sold by OmniProGear, Inc - Sale Prices Good 4/16 thru 4/30
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.

More Buying Choices
Add to Cart
$94.95
+ Free Shipping
Sold by: OlsenStore-Germany
Add to Cart
$99.95
& FREE Shipping. Details
Sold by: The Gear Co-op
Add to Cart
$99.95
+ Free Shipping
Sold by: 21st-Century-Goods
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Petzl Grigri 2 Belay Device

by Petzl

List Price: $99.95
Price: $94.00 & FREE Shipping
You Save: $5.95 (6%)
In stock.
Usually ships within 3 to 4 days.
Blue
One Size
  • Belay technique identical to classic belay systems: both hands on the rope. A fall is stopped by tightening the hand on the free end of the rope
  • Assisted braking: during fall arrest, the belayer holds the free end of the rope, the cam pivots and pinches the rope, increasing the braking action until the rope stops sliding
  • The GRIGRI 2 is compact and ultra-light at 185 g (25 % smaller and 20 % lighter than the GRIGRI)
  • Diagrams for rope installation engraved on belay device (interior and exterior)
  • Weight : 170 g. For 8.9 to 11 mm single ropes (optimized for 9.4 mm to 10.3 mm ropes). Certification(s) : pr EN 15151-1 type 6, UIAA
15 new from $86.00

Frequently Bought Together

Petzl GriGri 2 Belay Device Blue One Size + Black Diamond RockLock Screwgate Carabiner
Price for both: $104.95

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together


Product Description

Belay device with assisted braking for 8.9 to 11 mm rope. The GRIGRI 2 belay device with assisted braking capability is designed to facilitate belay maneuvers. The GRIGRI 2 works equally well for lead climbing and top-roping. It may be used on all single dynamic 8.9 to 11 mm ropes on the market (optimized for 9.4 mm to 10.3 mm ropes). Both compact and ultra-light, the GRIGRI 2 will accompany you on climbs around the world for many years. The GRIGRI 2 has a new design that allows excellent control during the descent. One hand holds the rope and the other uses the handle to unlock the cam. The patented handle design allows a very gradual release of the rope. In combination with the strong braking action of the cam, it gives a great feeling of security when lowering a partner or rappelling.

Important Information

Legal Disclaimer
The techniques employed in the proper and safe use of this equipment may only be learned through training received from an instructor who is well qualified in all aspects of rope rescue work. Use and inspect this equipment only in accordance with the manufacturers instructions. Never attempt to use this or any technical rescue equipment until you have received appropriate instruction. Proper training and experience is mandatory - practice with your system before working with live loads!

Seller Warranty Description
Petzl 3 year guarantee

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5 x 2 inches ; 7.4 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B004WF2FAM
  • Item model number: Petzl
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?



Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
15
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 18 customer reviews
Works as it should -- fantastically.
Mr. Hilmer
A simpler, cheaper, and slightly less foolproof alternative is Mammut's Smart Belay Device.
D. Alexander
Easy to use and generally safer, especially for someone first learning lead belaying.
Chris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By D. Alexander TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 11, 2012
This and the original Grigri are the two most common assisted-locking belay devices. I've had some experience with the original, a few weeks with this, and none with the Trango Cinch or the like, so take my impressions for what they're worth.

The major reason you'd buy an assisted-locking device is for the extra safety margin. The Grigri has a locking cam that halts the rope when it pulls out at a certain speed. That's a tremendous boon where the belayer is inattentive or inexperienced, or where the belayer can't see the climber. It's also next to impossible to get the webbing of your brake hand stuck in it, as I've seen twice occur with sudden falls to ATCs in the last three months. And when your climber wants to hang, it's a lot easier to sit and chill when you don't need to keep constant heavy braking tension.

Relative to the old Grigri, this one is significantly smaller and lighter. The old one could feel like an anchor if left on the harness for difficult climbs. This one, not so much. The friction lip is also a bit wider and easier to slot your fingers under, a helpful fulcrum if you're holding the cam down to feed rope. Inside, the rope grooves are sharper and tighter, which allows Petzl to officially support thinner ropes, but has some downstream implications I get into below.

The belay learning curve for top-roping is very short. For the initial feed of rope through the device, the Grigri is ingrained with clear directional diagrams. Taking rope is identical to what you'd do with an ATC.

Feeding rope for lead climbs takes a bit more practice. Conventional belay technique has your brake hand on the rope at all times.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By D. Alexander TOP 100 REVIEWER on February 22, 2012
Color Name: OrangeSize Name: One Size
This and the original Grigri are the two most common assisted-locking belay devices. I've had some experience with the original, a few weeks with this, and none with the Trango Cinch or the like, so take my impressions for what they're worth.

The major reason you'd buy an assisted-locking device is for the extra safety margin. The Grigri has a locking cam that halts the rope when it pulls out at a certain speed. That's a tremendous boon where the belayer is inattentive or inexperienced, or where the belayer can't see the climber. It's also next to impossible to get the webbing of your brake hand stuck in it, as I've seen twice occur with sudden falls to ATCs in the last three months. And when your climber wants to hang, it's a lot easier to sit and chill when you don't need to keep constant heavy braking tension.

Relative to the old Grigri, this one is significantly smaller and lighter. The old one could feel like an anchor if left on the harness for difficult climbs. This one, not so much. The friction lip is also a bit wider and easier to slot your fingers under, a helpful fulcrum if you're holding the cam down to feed rope. Inside, the rope grooves are sharper and tighter, which allows Petzl to officially support thinner ropes, but has some downstream implications I get into below.

The belay learning curve for top-roping is very short. For the initial feed of rope through the device, the Grigri is ingrained with clear directional diagrams. Taking rope is identical to what you'd do with an ATC.

Feeding rope for lead climbs takes a bit more practice. Conventional belay technique has your brake hand on the rope at all times.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By JORDY on May 7, 2013
Color Name: GreySize Name: One Size
I enjoy the grigri so much! It works like a charm. I especially like it when I have a friend projecting a rout and hanging up there for and hour, it gives me a nice bit of assistance. I have a rule though: newbs arent allowed to use grigris. Some people see them as a lovely "aurolocking" device to throw on their newb friends and voilà a bomb proof belay, right? WRONG! My buddy got 14 staples in his head because he used that mindset and, due to improper use of that little black bar, was dropped, his feet caught a ledge and then smack! Use with caution. New people to the grigri need specific instruction and should maintain the attention required when using an ATC.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By D. Alexander TOP 100 REVIEWER on March 30, 2013
Color Name: BlueSize Name: One Size
This and the original Grigri are the two most common assisted-locking belay devices. I've had some experience with the original, a few weeks with this, and none with the Trango Cinch or the like, so take my impressions for what they're worth.

The major reason you'd buy an assisted-locking device is for the extra safety margin. The Grigri has a locking cam that halts the rope when it pulls out at a certain speed. That's a tremendous boon where the belayer is inattentive or inexperienced, or where the belayer can't see the climber. It's also next to impossible to get the webbing of your brake hand stuck in it, as I've seen twice occur with sudden falls to ATCs in the last three months. And when your climber wants to hang, it's a lot easier to sit and chill when you don't need to keep constant heavy braking tension.

Relative to the old Grigri, this one is significantly smaller and lighter. The old one could feel like an anchor if left on the harness for difficult climbs. This one, not so much. The friction lip is also a bit wider and easier to slot your fingers under, a helpful fulcrum if you're holding the cam down to feed rope. Inside, the rope grooves are sharper and tighter, which allows Petzl to officially support thinner ropes, but has some downstream implications I get into below.

The belay learning curve for top-roping is very short. For the initial feed of rope through the device, the Grigri is ingrained with clear directional diagrams. Taking rope is identical to what you'd do with an ATC.

Feeding rope for lead climbs takes a bit more practice. Conventional belay technique has your brake hand on the rope at all times.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa5aa4b88)