A PhD Is Not Enough!: A Guide to Survival in Science and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$9.48
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $5.47 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A PhD Is Not Enough!: A Guide to Survival in Science Paperback – January 11, 2011


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$14.06
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.48
$5.21 $5.97
Showcase%20Weekly%20Deal


Frequently Bought Together

A PhD Is Not Enough!: A Guide to Survival in Science + How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing
Price for both: $18.50

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Teacher Supplies
Browse our Teacher Supplies store, with everything teachers need to educate students and expand their learning.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; Second Edition edition (January 11, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465022227
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465022229
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (78 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #24,243 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

A Senior Scientist at Sandia National Laboratories, Peter J. Feibelman received a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of California at San Diego, did postdoctoral research at the C.E.N. Saclay (France) and the University of Illinois (Urbana), and taught for three years at Stony Brook University. Feibelman lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

 


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Very easy read.
Michael Wood
The major weakness of this book is that Feibelman does not tell the reader to choose the type of projects that are interesting to him or her.
Gregory McMahan
When I first started reading the book I'd never heard of the author, and didn't really trust the things he said.
Jason Barnes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

78 of 80 people found the following review helpful By Gregory McMahan VINE VOICE on March 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
I have just begun a PhD program in engineering, and find the sobering wisdom contained in this book to be invaluable. The book is actually aimed at freshly minted PhDs, and serves to guide them as they plot an often precarious career in science and/or engineering. Despite this, the book contains a lot of advice that graduate students at the beginning or the middle of their program will find extremely useful. Feibelman is able to say in little over one hundred pages what most academic advisors almost always do not (and often purposely will not) get around to saying.
The first chapter of the book starts out with some scary examples of how freshly minted PhD holders quickly go wrong. The second chapter of the book gives some very practical advice on how to choose the right advisor for you- an often repeated mistake many graduate students make (including myself). The advice in the second chapter serves grad students and post docs equally well, and could almost be interchangeable.
The third and fourth chapters are about the bread and butter of a scientist's life- being able to give successful talks and writing compelling, useful publications. Feibelman tells us here that it is OK to regurgitate known material, to write your research publication as if you were telling a story, and most importantly, to make small, meaningful contributions.
Chapters five and six of the book discuss choosing the right career path after getting the sheepskin and how to shine in your job interviews, respectively. Competition is stiff in academia for positions, as we all know, and the situation is only marginally better in government and corporate labs, but Feibelman gives the new PhD some sound advice.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
85 of 88 people found the following review helpful By John H. Hwung on May 6, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Just as the title said, a PhD is not enough! Getting a PhD is just the beginning of a scientific career. There are many important "life" skills to learn. This book is unique in that it tells you what you need to do after you have your PhD.
Another very precious thing that this book reveals is that going directly to academia after your PhD is probably not the best way to establish yourself as a scientist. There are too many duties (teaching, handling the students, departmental meetings, etc) that demand your time that you won't enough time to do the main tasks - bring in a grant, reseach and publish. A better way is to go to an industrial or govermental lab and establish your scientific reputation there. You won't have the distractions and can concentrate on getting grant, research and publish. After you are established, you can go to academia easily, if you so choose.
Finally, the author reveals another big secret - pursue your long term research goal by a sequence of small projects.
This book is an excellent and indispensible guide for budding scientists. Get this book if you are serious about becoming a scientist. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A. A. Bailes on July 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
Feibelman has done a great service for future scientists in writing this book. Although a quick read, it's dense with good advice for budding scientists, whether they be at the grad student, postdoc, or assistant professor stage of their careers. For example, he advises against showing an outline at the beginning of a talk because it is as superfluous as it is ubiquitous. (See the review by Gregory McMahan for more specifics.)
The only shortcoming I find with the book is its focus on high level research. As a top scientist at a government lab, Feibelman directs his comments to those whose aspirations are similar to his. Not all of us who do research aspire to, or can, be tops in our field however. If you're looking for a book that tells you how to balance teaching and research or how to survive in different types of academic institutions, for example, a better choice would be Tomorrow's Professor by Richard Reis. Feibelman focuses only on the research side of the coin however.
Still, the book is excellent and can be useful to anyone whose career includes scientific research. I only wish I had found it earlier!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By S. Showalter on October 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
Overall, I did not find this book to be helpful upon reading it. The vast majority of the advice is either obvious or something you already know by the time you become aware of and purchase this book. Who doesn't know that working long hours and refraining from having children is one of the best ways to succeed in science? Who doesn't know that having a good mentor is an invaluable asset, but not guaranteed to happen because we as scientists receive no training in how to be good mentors?

On the positive side, if you read the anecdotes and success/failure stories that constitute a significant fraction of the book, there is a lot to be learned. Some provide hope because they remind you that others have successfully overcome the same challenges you have faced. Others reinforce the often overlooked point that, while having a supportive mentor is beneficial, we are in a career where being your own best advocate is a must. Taking the anecdotal stories as advice on how to best represent yourself and prepare for your career can make this a useful read. That having been said, the value of the advice tapers off the later in your career you read it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews