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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on October 7, 2012
The content of the book is as expected, but I am highly frustrated at the charts and tables. The print on the charts/ tables are too small to read and when you try to enlarge the print, the letters appear really fuzzy. So basically, the charts and tables are useless. I wish I purchased the actual textbook rather than the kindle version. Kindle really needs to fix this because it is a terrible inconvenience for students! So I give poor reviews and do not recommend this kindle book to anyone...just buy the actual textbook!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on November 10, 2012
I really have nothing to compare this book to, but I think it's good for what it's made for. For an overview, pharacology class after which the student will become a prescriber then it's a good book. I actually enjoy reading this because it's succinct, yet what you want to know is included. This is one of few textbooks ever (undergrad and grad included) that I plan to keep.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on July 19, 2013
Pathophysiology review is very good. Skin chapters are missing color plates referred to in the text. Respiratory sections refer to medications that were taken off the market in 2010. I find numerous examples where a medication is referred to as very effective in one paragraph and the student advised to not use it in another. It often seems that one person wrote part of the section and someone else wrote additional information and the two were merged without checking for conflicts. I'm currently using the text for class. Associated test bank questions are vague and many of them conflict with the text information. Some don't offer the correct answer as an option. In writing to the publisher with examples their editorial board agreed and will be removing my examples from the test bank. In an email from a company representative I was told the authors have been told it would be worth their while to review and revise the test bank questions as they have received numerous inqiries about these issues. The text needs the same scrutiny.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 12, 2013
This is the only text used in our FNP program. The text is broken down in sections: pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, mechanism of Action, clinical uses,clinical uses, adverse events, drug interactions, how to avoid drug errors, and changes in parameters in pediatric, geriatric, and pregnant patients. If we weren't using this text in class I would purchase it as a resource.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 24, 2013
I concur with another reviewer - the charts and figures in the ebook are very small. I downloaded a sample text onto my Kindle for PC. I have a 20" monitor so I wanted to see if I could view the charts/graphs/figures on my big monitor. No dice. When I enlarged the size of the text - all it did was just that - it enlarged the size of the text only and the size of the figures stayed the same size. I still had to squint to read the small font sized figures. This is really frustrating. At least with a physical book, I can use a copier and enlarge the size of the figure on the copier. I wish they would find a way to also zoom into figures so its easier to read on Kindle.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 9, 2014
the book itself is a good pharm book.
But the e version sucks: Horrible lay out.
Difficult to read: the physical font in the e-version is terrible.
There are tables of drug classes that are literally unreadable - the font size won't change.
I don't know how they converted this text book into an e book, but it didn't work.
Buy the paper copy -
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 28, 2013
Excellent resource for pharmacology review. Kindle version is clear and easy to read. I will recommend it to my colleagues.
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on February 27, 2015
The book is poorly written. It contradicts itself EVERYWHERE. The majority of the material is over 11 years old. For example, in Unit 1, there are only 5 total citations out of >200 that are from after 2007. An example: the pediatrics portion still recommends use of nebulizers even though most hospital systems are phasing them out for spacers. I'm a certified asthma educator so I'll use the asthma as an example. Since I had been doing that job (2009) the American Lung Association had recommended spacer use for ALL ages regardless of "coordination". Theophylline which is rarely given anymore (and only as last line therapy) is mentioned as an option. There isn't a big focus on inhaled corticosteroid/LABA treatment at all (which is now recommended first line treatment for moderate persistent asthma). I mention this example because it's what I know. As I'm studying and reading the chapters I'm noticing references on drug therapy mainly from the late 90's early 2000's. I wonder how many lawsuits or changes in drug therapy across the board have been done since then. It just seems like it's setting us up for failure as practitioners using data that could possibly be contraindicated or since outdated. In the pain section, I was surprised there was no mention of wounded warriors as a special population (the majority of that data was also pre-Iraq war (2000-2002)). They only give "cancer pain" as chronic pain, which I suppose may be similar to the wounded warrior population... but I think it's a big enough population at this point in time that we would want to at least minimally address some of their needs. Think about it... no updates since Back Street Boys and N*Sync were still together. I'm not kidding! Another user mentioned that it seems like they wrote the book without checking with each other to see what guidelines each section writer was using; I would agree with that. Anyway, think twice before recommending this book for your class, or provide updates and test based on current evidence based practice. I took an advanced pharm class, and the school I'm attending now did not accept the transfer credits and I really liked how that professor ran it. Everything was based off of case studies and current practice rather than going by a specific book. I think I learned a lot more that way. Just my opinion.

Additional discrepancies: chapters 41 and 40. 41 calls effexor a 1st line drug for anxiety and lists it as an SSRI. It makes no mention of SNRIs as their own class. Hoeever, 40 calls it an SNRI and therefore a second line drug for depression.

Chapter 42: Insomnia. Under first line therapy, says benedryl is the only drug approved for pregnancy. Under "women" in the same chapter, it says that benedryl is a class C drug, ambien is class B and therefore the safest drug to give in pregnancy.

Insomnia chapter 42 again. Table 42.2 calls ambien a first line drug for insomnia. Under "second line" in the paragraphs it says it is a second line drug.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 16, 2014
Language is really easy to understand. Very organized in terms of medications for different groups is diseases and conditions. Case study's are very helpful and answers are easy to find within the text
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 4, 2014
Excellent text! Easy to read and use as a reference. This is one of the best texts I have used in my studies as an FNP
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