Buy Used
$12.45
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Has highlighting, writing, underlining, corner creasing. Cover has creasing. Used stickers.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Phenomenology of Perception (Routledge Classics) Paperback – January 13, 1995

ISBN-13: 978-0415045568 ISBN-10: 0415045568 Edition: New edition

Used
Price: $12.45
11 New from $20.00 32 Used from $6.42 1 Collectible from $48.66
Rent from Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
$8.91
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$74.20 $8.92
Paperback, January 13, 1995
$20.00 $6.42
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

There is a newer edition of this item:


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Routledge Classics
  • Paperback: 488 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; New edition edition (January 13, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415045568
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415045568
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #863,683 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Merleau-Ponty was one of the most substantial French philosophers of the twentieth century.' - Times Literary Supplement

Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 79 people found the following review helpful By Science Geek on March 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
As shown in his first book, The Structure of Behavior, and this extension of that piece, Merleau-Ponty was a philosopher who was way ahead of his time.
While Husserl was off sputtering abstractly about phenomenology and 'essences', Merleau-Ponty planted himself squarely into the concrete, thick, world of lived experience: this book is a detailed phenomenological description of of attention, memory, space-perception, free will, and other psychological/phenomenological categories. M-P claims that simply by paying attention to this lifeworld, we see that previous philosophical systems have overlooked ineliminable dimensions of what it is like to be a person, and that this oversight has led to radically incomplete philosophical accounts of things like memory, perception, etc..
The book is so rich, original, and nuanced that it is hard to do it justice in a short review here. Not saddling himself with narrow academic techniques or fields, he draws on any resources he can to come to make sense of human experience. He cites not only philosophers such as Heidegger and Sarte, but draws equally heavily upon the Gestalt psychologists and neuroscientists of his day. He discusses phantom limbs, experiments on spatial perception, and psychophysical results from the Gestalt psychologists.
Many ideas that are popular in modern analytic philosophy and psychology can be found in this book: the view that 'sense data' are simply theoretical constructs, the view that attention focuses on objects not abstract spatial locations, and the claim that our original concepts cannot be understood independently of the embodied interactions with the world where we first come to use them.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Anthony L. Macri, Jr. on August 18, 2001
Format: Paperback
Originally, I read this book as part of a Philosophy of the Body course, in companion with Sartre's magnum opus, Being and Nothingness. Trying to keep the two thinkers separate was quite easy, because of the difference in approach and ideas that they both take. Sartre relies on a dualism and intellectualism not easily understood, resulting in a complex and amorphous work, which is still utterly powerful.
M-P, however, as one review said, remains in the concrete experience of everyday life. Perception, the way the mind interprets the senses, the importance of memory, time, and freedom in the world, are all utterly important in this work. M-P provides a work which attempts to synthesize psychology, physicality, and philosophy resulting in a more holistic and foundational work than many 20th century philosophers.
This book can be read as philosophy or psychology, in fact, any course on perception in a Psychology department should read it. Anyone wishing to discuss the question of Pontius Pilate ("What is truth?") should read this book. It touches on so many themes of intellectual life that it will become perhaps the most influential work of philosophy of the 20th century, vying with Sartre's Being and Nothingness and Heidegger's Being and Time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Parker Benchley VINE VOICE on November 18, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When all is said and done (and that will take a while) on the studies of philosophy in the 20th century, two names will stand out as being the most influential: Martin Heidegger and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. The Phenomenology of Perception was Merleau-Ponty's second work and lays the foundation for his later writings. What Merleau-Ponty attempts to do in this work is to take phenomenology away from the idealist and dualistic tracks of Husserl and Sartre and ground it firmly in ontology through a psychological analysis of perception. In doing so, Merleau-Ponty lays the foundations for Structuralism and its later incarnations, for better or worse, Poststructuralism and Deconstructuralism. (Derrida and Foucault attended his lectures.)Required reading for any student of 20th century thought and anyone who wants to know how philosophy came to its present position.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "hyperjeff" on August 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
This early work of Merleau-Ponty is one of the great works of phenomenology. It is a tremendously rich book, and contains a great deal of thought not reproduced elsewhere in his writings. He takes phenomenology in a different direction from that of Husserl, Heidegger and Sartre, though he remains in dialogue with all three throughout. Late 20th century philosophy owes much to Merleau-Ponty, and this is a key work in understanding his thought. In my own opinion, it is one of the great books of philosophy, and the translation by Colin Smith is excellent. I highly recommend it, as you may have guessed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Peter Jones on May 3, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Huge book and a classic of phenomenology and existentialism. Would love to see this thesis extended to dogs, ie, just how do dogs and other mammals for that matter, actually perceive their being.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?