Customer Reviews


43 Reviews
5 star:
 (16)
4 star:
 (9)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (10)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Chronicle of the Possible Navy Experiment
The so-called Philadelphia Experiment, the actual rendering of a navy destroyer invisible to the naked eye but having its crew suffer horrible effects, has been a fascinating ghost that roams on the realm of believability. The authors of this book make a good case for there being an actual experiment conducted in the Philadelphia Navy Yard under the auspices of...
Published on January 29, 1999

versus
28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dont expect too much
Because the navy officially denies that any such experiment ever occurred, there is virtually no information available about the experiment. Therefore the authors rely on second-hand accounts, hearsay, and the recollections of some individuals long after the alleged experiment occurred.
Some of these accounts may or may not be true. The problem with this however,...
Published on July 1, 1999 by Amazon Customer


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dont expect too much, July 1, 1999
By 
Amazon Customer (Pasadena, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Philadelphia Experiment (Mass Market Paperback)
Because the navy officially denies that any such experiment ever occurred, there is virtually no information available about the experiment. Therefore the authors rely on second-hand accounts, hearsay, and the recollections of some individuals long after the alleged experiment occurred.
Some of these accounts may or may not be true. The problem with this however, is that the authors do not attempt to document their sources. This means they are either unable or unwilling to document these sources. All of which means many or all of these sources or accounts could either be true or false.
Basically, nobody will ever know, and the authors may have wanted it that way. Admittedly, the book IS interesting, as long as the reader takes in the material with a certain amount of cautious skepticism. But there doesn't seem to be anything here that is strongly substantiated. That doesn't prove it's NOT true, it only proves that it cannot be proven to BE true.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


32 of 39 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This is the worst i've read about the infamous experiment!!!, May 16, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Philadelphia Experiment (Mass Market Paperback)
I have read many articles and books about this philadelphia experiment...and i have to say this book is one of the worst. The author claims he has so much new information about this incident..but in actually he doesn't. I found he repeats alot of his arguments and statements alot throughout his chapters.There is better material than this. This book has nothing to do with the philadelphia experiment itself,just about theories if the experiment did actually happen. There is nothing about what actually occured during the experiment, his research is grade D. I suggest reading other books about the philadelphia experiment.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Chronicle of the Possible Navy Experiment, January 29, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Philadelphia Experiment (Mass Market Paperback)
The so-called Philadelphia Experiment, the actual rendering of a navy destroyer invisible to the naked eye but having its crew suffer horrible effects, has been a fascinating ghost that roams on the realm of believability. The authors of this book make a good case for there being an actual experiment conducted in the Philadelphia Navy Yard under the auspices of Albert Einstein during 1943 to render a U.S. destroyer invisible to radar. However, the reader must beware of believing too much data form "scientists involved in the project yet wanting to remain anonymous". People, for whatever reasons, can and do lie. This could be no exception. With that being said, though, it appears that there WAS some kind of strange experiment that occurred. What that experiment exactly was and what the effects were on the crew of the ship will doubtless remain a mystery until whatever government files on the project are released. Do read the book if you have any interest at all in the possibility of humans vanishing from existance or burning for 18 days.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A FASCINATING, YET QUESTIONABLE, ACCOUNT, November 6, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Philadelphia Experiment (Mass Market Paperback)
The book, if approached as a work of fiction, is mind-bending. Just think, the United States having discovered the mystery behind Einstein's Unified Field Theory, where combining electromagnetic forces with gravity produces properties that allow time/dimension travel! The author(s) make fine attempts to substantiate many of the claims that are a part of the legend of Project Rainbow, but I found the evidence, as a whole, lacking. The day someone comes out with a book, giving me a complete bibliography (and footnotes with each piece of evidence), exact names, ship logs, dated newspaper articles (with newspaper of origin), and mathematical basis for the event, I will have reason to believe the Philadelphia Experiment took place. But tying the incident with aliens and UFO contact? A little far-fetched.
Nevertheless, a higly-recommended book for those interested in what many believe really happened during World War II, at a now-abandoned navy yard on the Delaware River.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Suspends your disbelief, August 22, 2004
Caveat - I wasn't exactly expecting to finish PE a die-hard believer. That said, I was unprepared for how much of my skepticism stemmed from the authors' willingness to believe anything, and mask their suspension of disbelief as objectivity.

According to legend, the US Navy conducted invisibility experiments on one of their ships during WWII. Not simply invisible, the ship actually teleported from its berth in Philadelphia. However, the little-understood process played havoc with the crew - even after the experiment's end, some crewmen would "blink" in and out of existence, become frozen in time or catch fire. One man walked through a wall, never to be seen again. Of course, the Navy denies the whole thing....

While the legend places the story during the dark days of WWII, the legend itself began in the mid 1950's, with the publication of "The Case for the UFO" by Morris Jessup. (Aknowledging that Jessup is no scientist, Berlitz & Moore nevertheless refer to him as "Dr. Jessup".) Believing that propulsion of UFO's (and perhaps future human spacecraft) lay in solving Einstein's "Unified Field Theory", Jessup encouraged readers to press for research in that area. Jessup's book caught the attention of Carl Allen (AKA Carlos Allende), who spent the war in the Merchant Marine. In a series of rambling letters Allen insisted that Einstein had solved UFT, and the solution was successfully used to cloak a USN warship in wartime experiments. Though claiming to have witnessed the event from deck of a nearby freighter, Allen goes further than detailing his observation - exhaustively describing the travails of the crew, Einstein's seeming retraction of UFT, his admission to Bertrand Russel that UFT was complete but had to be suppressed at least until after WWIII, the identity of one of the chief scientists attached to the project, and that UFT had anything to do with the experiment. To get his point across, Allen/Allende even forwarded a copy of Jessup's book (heavily annotated with his own theories, many having nothing to do with the Philadelphia Experiment) to the Office of Naval Research. There it piqued the personal interest of at least 2 officers, and slowly became the story-that-wouldn't-die. A few years later, a depressed Jessup was found dead in his car. Allende/Allen became something of a cult celeb, sometimes retracting what he had previously claimed, often warning against the ominous dangers of UFT even as he seemed to beg others to look into it.

Berlitz and Moore piece Allen/Allende together with what are supposed to be other pieces of a puzzle that will prove the Philadelphia Experiment actually occurred. Instead, the result is far less than the sum of its parts: Berlitz and Moore place far more weight on any of the individual pieces than common sense would allow, and they find a better fit between the different pieces than you'd get in a jigsaw puzzle. Nothing in PE lacks a more reasonable explanation than the authors can provide. At the beginning, and towards the end of the book, the authors mention coming in contact with others who claim to have met alleged crewmembers of the ship involved in the experiment - but neither name nor any other convincing corroborating information comes out (Allende at least included his Merchant Marine ID in his letters). The authors add to the puzzle, but never actually establish that the Philadelphia Experiment actually occurred. An anonymous radar scientist, who doesn't claim to have worked on the project, clairifies how events would have had to occurr if the legend were true. Another scientist - given a psuedonym because it would upset "the status quo" - describes wartime discussions on a project that we're supposed to believe developed into the Philadelphia Experiment. Named "Rinehart" after a similar character in the novel "Thin Air" (a thriller inspired by the legend) the doctor describes discussions but never mentions witnessing the experiment, nor any discussions of its aftermath - obvious details for such a pivotal figure. "Rinehart" never even mentions Allende, even though it had been Allende's letters that clued the authors into Rinehart's existence (under yet another pseudonym). The authors never explain how they managed to find "Rinehart" - they need to protect his identity even though the government obviously knows who he is, and anybody else would have the same difficulty tracking him down as the authors of this book. The authors describe how the experiments of another scientist in "electrogravity" never caught on despite their apparent success - suggesting they were suppressed. Though Allende described reading stories about the Experiment's sailors in Philadelphia newspapers, the only article that could be found is obviously bogus: a xerox of an obviously fabricated article describing a bar-room brawl by sailors who mysteriously vanish - but no mention of date, newspaper, or the reporter, nor
any specific facts in the article about the event, like the name of the bar or those of witnesses. The authors make the barest efforts to answer the questions they raise, and then merely add more pieces to the puzzle, without explaining how one piece corroborates any others. Though appearing critical and objective, it's impossible to believe that the authors haven't already settled on the idea that the experiment actually occurred - they explicitly question Allende, yet never express their doubts, let alone attempt to deal with our own.

But what's the danger of that? I mean, who cares if they can get their readers to believe the legend of the "Philadelphia Experiment". Unfortunately, "Philadelphia" feeds on our prejudices of secret conspiracies, and relies on our willingness to do so with little prompting - never a positive thing. Worse, it's not even interesting - barely substantive enough to raise the sort of questions that would make a more critical investigation a stirring story.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Military cover-up?, February 1, 2000
This review is from: Philadelphia Experiment (Mass Market Paperback)
I myself have done much research into the validity of the PX (Philadelphia Experiment). I should probably mention that I did this research before reading the book.
This book is interesting indeed, but you can find out as much, if not more, from websites alone. Marshall Barnes (a private investigator) has also done a considerable amount of research on this subject, and I suggest you try to find transcripts of any interviews he has been in.
So, will this book give you the secrets that the military so dearly holds? No, it won't, but it is worth the read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Philadelphia Experiment, January 6, 2000
This review is from: Philadelphia Experiment (Mass Market Paperback)
I liked Berlitz's books in young childhood, and have a certain fondness for them now. I appreciate them as purveyors of modern legend, since Berlitz never did any hard research, like looking in archives, official documents, etc. He would just repeat credulously what others had told him or written. But as for the Philadelphia Experiment, Moore and Berlitz fell far short of proving their case. Their star witness, Carlos Allende, is clearly insane and unreliable. Their other chief witness, Dr. "Rinehart," is quite paranoid and possibly insane as well. There really aren't any more witnesses, just a little innuendo. Furthermore, Allende's stories just don't check out when they can be checked out. He says there was a brief article about the experiment in a Philadelphia newspaper about that time - can't be found. Neither Allende nor his ship can be definitely placed in Philadelphia when the experiment supposedly took place. Allende identified the U.S.S. Eldridge as the test ship. There is no evidence of that, and besides, Allende's ship was being escorted a few weeks later in convoy by the Eldridge. To this observor that explains where Allende got the name of the ship - Allende had contact with the Eldridge in the Atlantic, not in Philadelphia, in other words. To sum, there is no hard evidence that the Philadelphia Experiment ever occurred.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A pile of speculations, July 10, 2000
This review is from: Philadelphia Experiment (Mass Market Paperback)
If there was a Philadelphia Experiment (PX) or not, you will certainly NOT know after reading this book. The authors have done some research throughout the time, but ended up with stories, which can also easily be discredited and with no real proof. This doesn't mean, however, that the book is poorly written. If there was the PX, it is logical that the documents and proofs were hidden or destroyed and it would be almost impossible to prove it. People's testimonies can be easily discredited (and people as well), so you end up with virtually nothing, as Moore and Berlitz did. So you must take the book in a "What if.." manner. The fact is that people are electromagnetic beings and that they suffer immense damage or die if they are exposed to high electrical current or strong electromagnetic fields. Hardly any scientist in the field of physics does not know that. But on the second hand - almost everywhere military forces are involved, common sense and logic departs the scene. If we could make some forces invisible, the Krauts would bite the dust. Let's do it. All possible scenarios seem equally logical. There probably was a PX (and who knows what else) but majority of us will never know. We will speculate as the authors have. On the cover of this book they promised to convince us, that PX happened. They failed. Therefore one star is gone. Otherwise you got nothing to lose, if you buy and read the book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Original Story., October 11, 2003
By 
OverTheMoon (overthemoonreview@hotmail.com) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Philadelphia Experiment (Mass Market Paperback)
The book was originally written in 1979 and for anyone who wants to know more about the Philadelphia Experiment, then this is precisely where you should start because this is the book that got the ball rolling. The Philadelphia Experiment tells the story of the governments attempt at optical and radar invisibility with a navy ship called the US Eldridge that resulted in a catastrophe but may have also uncovered a whole new area of physics - essentially warping space.
William L. Moore and Charles Berlitz simply go in search of the story behind the Eldridge which is based on a series of letters and notes sent by Carlos Miguele Allende in 1955 to a UFO writer called Morris K. Jessup after he published the first and original UFO book called "The Case for the UFO". Allende essentially told Jessup that he had been a navy officer who witnessed what happened to the US Eldridge as part of a government experiment on invisibility. He claimed that the project went wrong, men caught fire, went mad, some were embedded halfway into the deck of the ship and others phased in and out of this reality. Allende claimed that there was a link between this experiment and the technology behind UFOs. Jessup thought that Allende was a crank but after doing a little more research found that there was some background to his story and that it was worth investigating a little more. Eventually a number of Navy officers and commanders became interested in the story and decided to investigate it for themselves. In 1959, Jessup died under suspicious circumstances - dead in his car from carbon monoxide poisoning - and many believe that he was murdered.
Moore and Berlitz cover the entire original story of Jessup and Allende and expose various US military programs that are connected with the Philadelphia Experiment. The investigative reporting is extremely good and current Philadelphia Experiment writers and researchers have this book to thank for their endeavors.
Much more to the story has since been exposed but like anything you would do well to read this book to find out how it all started. Forget about the Montauk boys who claim to have been there when it happened. This is the book that you should start with first well before you even consider looking at the Montauk project.
This is a highly recommended piece of investigative journalism. You don't need to be a UFO buff either to enjoy it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars How did such an unconvincing book cause this much controversy, November 1, 2006
Though I wasn't expecting to finish PE a believer, I was surprised by how much of my skepticism stemmed from the authors' willingness to believe anything, and mask suspension of disbelief as objectivity.

According to legend, the US Navy conducted invisibility experiments on one of their ships during WWII and actually teleported the ship from Philadelphia. The little-understood process played havoc with the crew - even after the experiment's end, some crewmen would "blink" in and out of existence, become frozen in time or catch fire. One man walked through a wall, never to be seen again. Of course, the Navy denies the whole thing....

While the legend places the story in 1943, the legend itself arose in the 1950's, with the publication of "The Case for the UFO" by Morris Jessup. (Giving us a taste of the authors' objectivity, they acknowledge that Jessup is no scientist but nevertheless repeatedly refer to him as "Dr. Jessup".) Believing that spacecraft propulsion would rely on solving Einstein's "Unified Field Theory", Jessup encouraged readers to press for research in that area. Jessup's book caught the attention of Carl Allen (AKA Carlos Allende), who spent the war in the Merchant Marine. In a series of rambling letters Allen insisted that Einstein had solved UFT, and described what is now known as Philadelphia Experiment as an application of UFT's solution. Though claiming at first to be an eyewitness, Allen goes further than detailing his observation - exhaustively describing the travails of the crew, Einstein's seeming retraction of UFT, his admission to Bertrand Russell that UFT was complete but had to be suppressed at least until after WWIII, the identity of one of the chief scientists attached to the project, and that UFT had anything to do with the experiment - Berlitz never explains Allende's being both the sole named eye-witness of the experiment (including its appearance in another harbor miles away) and his close contact with principal personalities of the experiment (given the necessary secrecy that such a project would have had). To get his point across, Allen/Allende even forwarded a copy of Jessup's book (heavily annotated with his own theories, many having nothing to do with the Philadelphia Experiment, and which should have by then alerted everybody that Allende was an utter crackpot) to the Office of Naval Research. There it piqued the personal interest of at least 2 officers, and became the story-that-wouldn't-die.

A depressed Jessup was found dead in his car, a suicide. Some of Jessup's friends proved ready to attach any conspiratorial implication to Jessup's death, but not the futility of his work, or the humiliation of having his work share attention with Allende's half-baked theories. Allende became a cult celeb, sometimes retracting claims, often warning against UFT even as he seemed to beg others to look into it.

The authors piece Allende together with other pieces of a puzzle that will prove the Philadelphia Experiment actually occurred, but end up with a result far less than the sum of its parts: Berlitz/Moore place more weight on any individual piece than common sense would allow, finding a better fit than you'd get in a jigsaw puzzle. Nothing in PE lacks a more reasonable explanation than the authors can provide. The authors mention coming in contact with others who claim to have met alleged crewmembers of the ship involved in the experiment - but neither name nor any other convincing corroborating information is disclosed. (Allende at least included his Merchant Marine ID.) The authors add to the puzzle, but never actually establish that the Philadelphia Experiment actually occurred. An anonymous radar scientist, who doesn't claim to have worked on the project, clarifies how events would have had to occur were the legend. Another scientist - given a pseudonym because it would upset "the status quo" - describes wartime discussions on a project that we're supposed to believe developed into the Philadelphia Experiment. Named "Rinehart" after a similar character in the novel "Thin Air" (a thriller inspired by the legend) the doctor describes discussions but never mentions witnessing the experiment, nor any discussions of its aftermath - obvious details for such a pivotal figure - not even mentioning Allende, even though it had been Allende's who clued the authors into Rinehart's existence (under yet another pseudonym). The authors never explain how they managed to find "Rinehart" - they need to protect his identity even though the government obviously knows who he is, and anybody else would have the same difficulty tracking him down as the authors of this book. The authors describe how the experiments of another scientist in "electrogravity" never caught on despite their apparent success - suggesting they were suppressed. Though Allende described reading stories about the Experiment's sailors in Philadelphia newspapers, the only article that could be found is obviously bogus: a xerox of an obviously fabricated article describing a bar-room brawl by sailors who mysteriously vanish - but no mention of date, newspaper, or the reporter, nor any facts in the article about the event, like the name of the bar or those of witnesses. The authors make the barest efforts to answer the questions they raise, and then merely add more pieces to the puzzle, without explaining how one piece corroborates any others. Though appearing critical and objective, it's impossible to believe that the authors haven't already settled on the idea that the experiment actually occurred - they explicitly question Allende, yet never express their doubts, let alone attempt to deal with our own.

It's clear that Berlitz - having already written books on Atlantis & the Bermuda Triangle - had read the novel "Thin Air" and figured he could get in on the action by appropriating the older book's premise, labeling it as fact and relying on enough readers to confuse his determination with reliable evidence.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Philadelphia Experiment
Philadelphia Experiment by Charles Berlitz (Mass Market Paperback - April 12, 1987)
Used & New from: $0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.