Philip Glass : The Music of Candyman
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 25, 2002
Since the first release of the movie "Candyman" in 1992 I have been searching for the soundtrack. To my dismay it was not available. Finally nearly 10 years later, We have a soundtrack. I am now a Music Composition Major at the Crane School Of Music loacted at the State University Of New York College At Potsdam.The reason I wanted to become a Music Composition Major is because of this very soundtrack. I'm awaiting Mr. Glass's soundtrack release of "Bent". BRAVO.....If you don't get this cd you will be missing out on so much!!
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on October 21, 2001
Although I've collected nearly 300 soundtracks/compilations since December, 1999, up until this week I'd NEVER bought any music by Philip Glass. This cd has changed that FOREVER!! After listening to a friend's copy over and over in the last three days, I ordered TWO copies; these babies should be arriving in about a week to 10 days (Priority Mail isn't what it used to be!) You WILL NOT be disappointed.
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on March 20, 2014
Ever since the first time I watched Candyman in my teens, the gorgeous score by Philip Glass heightened every moment of dread and tension of this horror classic. After viewing it with my girlfriend recently, I sought out the music. Glass knows his craft well. One of horror's best musical accompaniments worthy of the company of Carpenter, Manfredini and Goblin.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on November 3, 2001
If you love Philip Glass, there is no doubt that this CD will be welcome in your collection. Glass did not initially want to release this music on CD because there wasn't enough music to warrant it. But with the addition of music from Candyman 2, and to counter the bootlegs, it has been released and, according to Glass's website, only available thus far on Amazon. The pieces are very short and there is a fittingly gothic feel to the music. Actually, the length of the pieces are from 1:07 to 9:46 are more like the length of pop songs, which is unfortunate for me, since I like to immerse myself. There is a glaring and unforgivable error in the short liner notes that will, I'm sure, be corrected in the next pressing. The notes say that the movie was based on a story by Clive Barnes. WRONG. It was Clive Barker. Anyhow, buy this. It may not be available forever and I know that supplies at Amazon seem to be limited.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on November 22, 2001
Barker and Glass fans can breath a collective sigh of relief as this music finally sees the light of day in an appropriate cd release. This is by far one of the best soundtracks ever to be composed for a horror movie. One only wishes that Candyman II were the unsettling masterpiece the first film was. I would definitely suggest that watching the movie before listening to the soundtrack alone is important as the two seem almost inseparable to me. If you were a fan of the movie (as I imagine most people that like good horror movies and good movies in general are), you will love what the soundtrack alone conjures up. Glass (and Barker for that matter) would do well to collaborate again with artists with equal or greater talents as theirs, as the results are just so damn cool.
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on January 21, 2014
Probably one of Phillip Glass's best scores. "Music Box" being one of his best film score songs. Highly recommend to anyone who is a fan of Glass's work or any OST
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19 of 30 people found the following review helpful
on October 11, 2001
...that it's clear that Philip Glass wrote this music for another film. Or, at least, not the movie I saw. (I have no idea if "Candyman II, Farewell to the Flesh" is any good, since I wouldn't waste my time, after seeing the first. My guess is the only element of that effort which has a soupcon of quality is the roman numeral in the title. So, hereafter, I'll call it just "II").
If I hadn't read Don Christensen's liner notes, (I guess this is a hint as to my age) I still would have thought, upon hearing this CD, that composer Glass had a really fine mystery tale to tell, like "The Moonstone" or even "The Maltese Falcon", not a cheapy version of "Friday the Thirteenth". After reading the notes, I understand that he did have a fine chller in mind, it's just that the other guys, who had control of the final production, didn't.
So, the music, standing alone, should not be confused with the schlocky movies by a newby to the Glass oeuvre.
The first track, "Music Box", seems to be an homage to the band music in the finale of Beethoven's 9th, as it might be realized on a merry-go-round music box at an Atlantic coast amusement pier, circa 1939. But, Philip Glass doesn't write 19th century oompaa music, so it's not Ludvig Van's happy sappy "Ode to Joy". (OK, so it's Schiller's happy, sappy "Ode to Joy"). But, a haunting, bittersweet, dance tune calling forth the sad ballads of the loss of loved ones, of the unlived futures, of the unmet desires of the torch song. But, ending, as a good Glass tune should end, in the middle. With a question. With ambiguity as it's answer.
Tracks 3 and 7, "Helen's Theme" and "It was Always You, Helen", take up this tune once again and more fully realize the haunting little theme which contains, in small, all of the elements of the complete work, but adds the full throat of the organ and chorus and ending on track 3 with a short solo piano rendering and a return to the chorus, and the queston, and on track 7 with the piano, organ and chorus and an answer. And, surprise (!), track 13, the last cut on the album and the final tune in II, "Reverend's Walk" revits this theme and adds a period at the end.
Track 2 "Cabrini Green" is too pretty, Cabrini-Green, the low income housing complex on Chicago's near northwest side is not pretty. But, track 6, "Return to Cabrini", introduces the warning klaxon sound found in tracks 8 and, especially, track 11 and is the most purely Glass-like of all the music on the disk. It is the longest and most interesting of the pieces presented and gives a sense of the fear, unease and foreboding associated with both the subject matter and the place.
Tracks 4 and 5, "Face to Razor" and "Floating Candyman" and track 9 "The Slave Quarters" (from II) are wonderful examples of the interweaving of voice and keyboards which is a Glass hallmark.
Track 8, (the first of the II tracks) "Daniel's Flashback", the soundtrack to your worst nighmare, juxtaposes the organ which will be played at your funeral with the voices of the damned who sing as your puny soul is weighed on the Great Sabath after your death. Quite refreshing.
Track 10, "Annie's theme", alone, is worth the price of the Album.
Track 11, "All Falls Apart" is Walpurgisnacht. But, curiously up-tempo and upbeat. It is the witch's Sabath, celebrated with all the joy, one can muster on such a frightful night.
Track 12, "The Demise of Candyman" is a kind of reprise of "Annie's Theme" but draws the curtain on the urban legend of the Candyman. None too soon, I might add.
On balance, this is a subject not worthy of Philip Glass's talents, but rescued from deserved oblivion by his unswerving dedication to his craft and his genius.
A "must have" for the affictionado.
Thanks to Kurt Munkacsi, Don Christensen, Pete Keppler, Hector Castillo and Kara Bilof for their efforts in bringing this work to Philip Glass's many fans and to Michael Reisman for his superb and sure-handed direction.
M. Tepper, West Chicago
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on December 3, 2013
I bought this as a gift for my husband. He loves the Candyman theme music and this CD encompasses the enitre film's music. Awesome!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 3, 2003
I am also a collector of horror movie music and like others here, i see have been trying to get this ever since the first movie came out. this music gives you goosebumps and its one of my favorite horror soundtracks. they aslo just released the creepshow soundtrack which ive been waiting for too. Finally some decent movie soundtracks are being released! THe first two moves were good. I havent seen the third(and from what i hear i dont want to). but what made this movies besides virginia madsen adn tony todd who both did great jobs was these chilling scores. buy this. you wont be disappointed.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 19, 2002
A wopnderful and interesting contribution from Phillip Glass.
Fans of his will enjoy this limited time release of the soundtrack. It is interesting to compare this part to the original pieces he wrote for the Candyman film. I saw Glass's MATA series in NYC recently and out of all the musicians he has invited the composer John Fitz Rogers was the most interesting. I am glad to see they both have CD's available now. It bodes well for new classical music. TRANSIT-the Fitz Rogers piece-is certainly worth buying and makes you glad Glass continues to champion new music along with his.
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