Buy Used
$32.68
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Wordery USA
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: International shipping available. This fine copy is in our depot and should be with you within 11-12 working days via Air Mail. Please note this title is print on demand.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $4.95
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Philip of Macedon Paperback – February 26, 1998

1 customer review

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$30.92 $32.68

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Editorial Reviews

Review

""Throughout history Philip of Macedon has stood in the shadow of his son Alexander. With this magisterial book, N.G.L. Hammond does much to bring him, finally, into his own." -- American Historical Review



"Nicholas Hammond's name is synonymous with the evolution of Macedonian studies during the past quarter century." -- New England Classical Newsletter and Journal

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Nicholas Hammond is Professor Emeritus of Greek at Bristol University and an Honorary Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge. His many books include Alexander the Great: King, Commander, and Stateman and The Macedonian State.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 270 pages
  • Publisher: Gerald Duckworth & Co Ltd (February 26, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0715628291
  • ISBN-13: 978-0715628294
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,302,570 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JPS TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 21, 2014
Format: Paperback
This is a book that is over twenty years old and that I bought over a decade ago. Despite more recent ones on the same subject (in particular those of Ian Worthington and Richard Gabriel, although there are also a couple of others), this one remains the best in my view.

The main reason for this is that it does not even attempt to discuss the merits of Philip versus those of his talented “all-conquering” son Alexander, a discussion which is somewhat sterile even if fashionable to the extent that the son started with what his father left him. In other words, it is highly unlikely that Alexander would have achieved all of his victories, conquests and undying fame (for better or for worse) without the Balkan empire, state and war machine that he received from his father.

The main merit of this book is precisely to try to show in a book of less than 200 pages of text what the “Founding Father” really achieved – the creation of a unified Macedonian kingdom and dominance across the Balkans – and how he achieved it over less than a quarter of a century.

Although a first class piece of scholarship, the book is nevertheless very readable. In particular, while presenting the main debates of the period that saw the rise of Macedon, the author is generally careful not to enter into lengthy (and, for the general reader, often boring) discussions. The notes to the main text are also useful in listing the appropriate references although I would have personally preferred the author to come up with an extent bibliography. There is however a very useful chronology at the end of the book which shows in particular how methodical Philip was in his expansion.

Another element which needs to be mentioned is the author’s somewhat obvious sympathy for his subject.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?