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on January 16, 2011
Philips has done a fantastic job of confusing their line of Avent baby feeding bottles. It should be a simple matter to clearly name and describe a product such as this, but the reality is Philips has done it's best to complicate it.

Why the confusion: Over the past 25 years Philips has changes the Avent product line every year. Recently changes involved removing BPA from all parts that touch baby food (note that their products aren't 100% BPA free - parts that don't touch baby food may still contain BPA). This change introduced problems with some of the products causing the Avent venting system to leak (more on this later). In addition, Philips has used different product names for the same or similar products.

ISN'T A BOTTLE JUST A BOTTLE?
Recently Philips has made Avent bottles in several plastic materials:

1. Polycarbonate: this is a very hard and very clear plastic - it's properties closely match real glass and is commonly known by the brand name Lexan. For years almost all hard/clear food containers were made of polycarbonate plastic. Unfortunately, this type of plastic contains Bisphenol A (BPA) - which has been classified as a toxic substance in Europe and Canada (with the USA having serious concerns). Since 2008 manufacturers of almost all baby products have started to replace Polycarbonate with alternatives.

2. Polyethersulfone (PES): This rigid BPA free plastic hasn't traditionally been used in baby products because of the higher cost of the raw material. In addition, PES bottles typically have a brown or "honey" colored or brown tint - which may be unattractive to some parents.

2. Polypropylene (PP): Also a BPA free plastic, Polypropylene is slightly cloudy or milky in appearance. Containers made from Polypropylene are also slightly flexible.

Avent bottles are currently available in PES and PP models. Many people still have the old Polycarbonate bottles which perform great (but contain BPA).

LEAKS LEAKS LEAKS (AND THE MYSTERY OF THE "ADAPTER RING")
Many people have reported leaking problems with the newer Avent bottles. There are a couple of factors why this is happening:

The Avent system is designed to vent or let air into the bottle as baby feeds. This is achieved by having tiny slots cut into the base of the nipple. When baby sucks the nipple, it flexes and allows air into the venting slots (and then into the bottle). The benefit of this system is there are no special parts (see the Dr. Browns system) - so it's easy to clean and maintain. The disadvantage is this system relies on the interface/connection between the bottle and nipple - any problems where these two parts meet will cause leaks.

Many people have had issues maintaining a good connection between bottle and nipple with the PES (honey colored) bottles. This may be due to the bottle changing shape over time (particularly the impact of dishwasher washing).

The polypropylene bottles have a different issue. Polypropylene is simply too flexible to maintain good contact between the nipple and bottle. Philips has solved this problem redesigning the shape of the bottle and including a ridged "Adapter Ring" with recent polypropylene bottles (I think that first generation PP kits did not have this part). The adapter ring fits onto the top of the bottle and provides a stable and strong base needed by the Avent nipples. The new bottle shape with the adapter ring installed mimics the size and shape of the old style bottle. It's a hassle, but this extra part will prevent leaks if used properly. The ring also appears to be less susceptible to warping from high heat. You can purchase spare adapter rings separately.

Important: to prevent leaks you should assemble the bottle with nipple and adapter ring in place while it is wet! (read the manual).

CLASSIC VS ADVANCED VS NATURAL FEEDING VS EXTRA DURABLE
Philips seems confused with how to market Avent bottles. They have changed the name of Avent products over time and haven't done a good job differentiating between the polypropylene and PES bottles.

Some Avent bottles are branded CLASSIC and ADVANCED. The "Classic" bottles are the milky colored, softer plastic, polypropylene (PP) bottles which use the adapter ring - these are typically sold in a BLUE/WHITE BOX. The "Advanced" bottles are the honey colored, rigid plastic, polyethersulfone (PES) bottles - these are sold in a YELLOW/WHITE BOX.

Recently all Avent bottles have been branded NATURAL FEEDING - this additional name does not indicate which type of plastic the bottles are made of.

SO PES OR PP?
After trying both, I think I'll be using the Polypropylene (PP). At first I thought the adapter ring was a step backward - why do I want to deal with the extra part? But in practice it isn't much of a hassle at all. In addition, many people have reported leaks with the PES bottles. In addition, the PES bottles were less expensive (when I bought them).

Remember to assemble your bottles properly (wet) and do not over tighten them.

SHOPPING ON AMAZON
Make sure you know which type of bottle you are getting. Unfortunately, the Amazon product descriptions for Avent bottles don't always indicate which type of bottle you are getting. Philips makes most sizes of the Avent bottle in both types of plastic. Read the product description carefully before buying. Be cautious with reviews as some reviewers have written reviews for the other plastic type.

UPDATE 1
It is becoming harder to get anything but the "classic" (blue box) polypropylene (pp) bottles as it appears Phillips has recently withdrawn available inventories of all other bottles (i was talking to the manager of a local baby store who indicated they had to remove all Avent PES bottles and return them to Phillips). Still check to make sure you are getting the type of bottles you expect.

UPDATE 2 - June 2011
I still see old PES bottles for sale but they are almost completely gone. The "classic" polypropylene (pp) bottles are now available in blue and pink tints. Another recent change - recently manufactured bottles have a slightly wider mouth - you can tell if you have this new generation of bottles if the adapter ring does not fit snuggly (and will not stay in the bottle if held upside down).

Some people have ask what size nipples are included in the sets. 9 ounce bottle sets come with #2 nipples. 4 ounce bottle sets come with #1 nipples.
review image review image review image
1212 comments355 of 363 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on January 16, 2011
Philips has done a fantastic job of confusing their line of Avent baby feeding bottles. It should be a simple matter to clearly name and describe a product such as this, but the reality is Philips has done it's best to complicate it.

Why the confusion: Over the past 25 years Philips has changes the Avent product line every year. Recently changes involved removing BPA from all parts that touch baby food (note that their products aren't 100% BPA free - parts that don't touch baby food may still contain BPA). This change introduced problems with some of the products causing the Avent venting system to leak (more on this later). In addition, Philips has used different product names for the same or similar products.

ISN'T A BOTTLE JUST A BOTTLE?
Recently Philips has made Avent bottles in several plastic materials:

1. Polycarbonate: this is a very hard and very clear plastic - it's properties closely match real glass and is commonly known by the brand name Lexan. For years almost all hard/clear food containers were made of polycarbonate plastic. Unfortunately, this type of plastic contains Bisphenol A (BPA) - which has been classified as a toxic substance in Europe and Canada (with the USA having serious concerns). Since 2008 manufacturers of almost all baby products have started to replace Polycarbonate with alternatives.

2. Polyethersulfone (PES): This rigid BPA free plastic hasn't traditionally been used in baby products because of the higher cost of the raw material. In addition, PES bottles typically have a brown or "honey" colored or brown tint - which may be unattractive to some parents.

2. Polypropylene (PP): Also a BPA free plastic, Polypropylene is slightly cloudy or milky in appearance. Containers made from Polypropylene are also slightly flexible.

Avent bottles are currently available in PES and PP models. Many people still have the old Polycarbonate bottles which perform great (but contain BPA).

LEAKS LEAKS LEAKS (AND THE MYSTERY OF THE "ADAPTER RING")
Many people have reported leaking problems with the newer Avent bottles. There are a couple of factors why this is happening:

The Avent system is designed to vent or let air into the bottle as baby feeds. This is achieved by having tiny slots cut into the base of the nipple. When baby sucks the nipple, it flexes and allows air into the venting slots (and then into the bottle). The benefit of this system is there are no special parts (see the Dr. Browns system) - so it's easy to clean and maintain. The disadvantage is this system relies on the interface/connection between the bottle and nipple - any problems where these two parts meet will cause leaks.

Many people have had issues maintaining a good connection between bottle and nipple with the PES (honey colored) bottles. This may be due to the bottle changing shape over time (particularly the impact of dishwasher washing).

The polypropylene bottles have a different issue. Polypropylene is simply too flexible to maintain good contact between the nipple and bottle. Philips has solved this problem redesigning the shape of the bottle and including a ridged "Adapter Ring" with recent polypropylene bottles (I think that first generation PP kits did not have this part). The adapter ring fits onto the top of the bottle and provides a stable and strong base needed by the Avent nipples. The new bottle shape with the adapter ring installed mimics the size and shape of the old style bottle. It's a hassle, but this extra part will prevent leaks if used properly. The ring also appears to be less susceptible to warping from high heat. You can purchase spare adapter rings separately.

Important: to prevent leaks you should assemble the bottle with nipple and adapter ring in place while it is wet! (read the manual).

CLASSIC VS ADVANCED VS NATURAL FEEDING VS EXTRA DURABLE
Philips seems confused with how to market Avent bottles. They have changed the name of Avent products over time and haven't done a good job differentiating between the polypropylene and PES bottles.

Some Avent bottles are branded CLASSIC and ADVANCED. The "Classic" bottles are the milky colored, softer plastic, polypropylene (PP) bottles which use the adapter ring - these are typically sold in a BLUE/WHITE BOX. The "Advanced" bottles are the honey colored, rigid plastic, polyethersulfone (PES) bottles - these are sold in a YELLOW/WHITE BOX.

Recently all Avent bottles have been branded NATURAL FEEDING - this additional name does not indicate which type of plastic the bottles are made of.

SO PES OR PP?
After trying both, I think I'll be using the Polypropylene (PP). At first I thought the adapter ring was a step backward - why do I want to deal with the extra part? But in practice it isn't much of a hassle at all. In addition, many people have reported leaks with the PES bottles. In addition, the PES bottles were less expensive (when I bought them).

Remember to assemble your bottles properly (wet) and do not over tighten them.

SHOPPING ON AMAZON
Make sure you know which type of bottle you are getting. Unfortunately, the Amazon product descriptions for Avent bottles don't always indicate which type of bottle you are getting. Philips makes most sizes of the Avent bottle in both types of plastic. Read the product description carefully before buying. Be cautious with reviews as some reviewers have written reviews for the other plastic type.

UPDATE 1
It is becoming harder to get anything but the "classic" (blue box) polypropylene (pp) bottles as it appears Phillips has recently withdrawn available inventories of all other bottles (i was talking to the manager of a local baby store who indicated they had to remove all Avent PES bottles and return them to Phillips). Still check to make sure you are getting the type of bottles you expect.

UPDATE 2 - June 2011
I still see old PES bottles for sale but they are almost completely gone. The "classic" polypropylene (pp) bottles are now available in blue and pink tints. Another recent change - recently manufactured bottles have a slightly wider mouth - you can tell if you have this new generation of bottles if the adapter ring does not fit snuggly (and will not stay in the bottle if held upside down).

Some people have ask what size nipples are included in the sets. 9 ounce bottle sets come with #2 nipples. 4 ounce bottle sets come with #1 nipples.
review image
66 comments46 of 49 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on October 21, 2009
For our first baby born in July '07, we used (and loved) the original Polycarbonate Avent bottles the first few months. Then the BPA paranoia overtook us, and we switched to Born Free bottles, which are made of honey-colored Polyether Sulphone (PES). The Born Free bottles worked well enough, but we hated the 2 extra complicated parts per bottle that we had to clean. For our second kid born in Sept '09, we wanted badly to switch back to Avent, but read poor reviews of the PES BPA-free Avent bottles (apparently they leaked for many users). Fortunately, right around that time, Avent introduced a second line of BPA-free bottles made of the cloudy Polypropylene (PPE), and initial reviews indicated that Avent fixed the leaks (by adding a simple removable collar between the bottle and nipple). After 1 month of using these new PPE Avent bottles, I can attest that they indeed don't leak, and I don't need to take special care or do any procedure to make them leak-free. They just don't leak. Yes, the newly added collar is an extra part to clean, but at least it's a simple part that's easy to clean. So for all you Avent fans out there, take heart! Avent fixed the leaks. Tip: the leaky PES honey-colored bottles come in yellow-colored boxes. The new leak-free PPE cloudy bottles come in blue-colored boxes. Buy the blue-colored boxes.
0Comment51 of 59 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on January 16, 2011
For our first baby born in July '07, we used (and loved) the original Polycarbonate Avent bottles the first few months. Then the BPA paranoia overtook us, and we switched to Born Free bottles, which are made of honey-colored Polyether Sulphone (PES). The Born Free bottles worked well enough, but we hated the 2 extra complicated parts per bottle that we had to clean. For our second kid born in Sept '09, we wanted badly to switch back to Avent, but read poor reviews of the PES BPA-free Avent bottles (apparently they leaked for many users). Fortunately, right around that time, Avent introduced a second line of BPA-free bottles made of the cloudy Polypropylene (PPE), and initial reviews indicated that Avent fixed the leaks (by adding a simple removable collar between the bottle and nipple). After 1 month of using these new PPE Avent bottles, I can attest that they indeed don't leak, and I don't need to take special care or do any procedure to make them leak-free. They just don't leak. Yes, the newly added collar is an extra part to clean, but at least it's a simple part that's easy to clean. So for all you Avent fans out there, take heart! Avent fixed the leaks. Tip: the leaky PES honey-colored bottles come in yellow-colored boxes. The new leak-free PPE cloudy bottles come in blue-colored boxes. Buy the blue-colored boxes.
0Comment17 of 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 4, 2010
We did a completely unscientific test comparing these to the Madela (that came with the pump) and Dr Browns.

I'm sleepy from sleep deprevation (we have a new born, hence the bottle comparo) so I'll make this brief:

Madela: Basic bottles, the store milk but seem to promote the ingestion of bubbles when our baby nurses.
Dr. Browns: Too many parts to clean. It may be the best but frankly I'm too tired to assemble, tear down and clean it.
Avent: It works! You can hear the air seeping through the vent and there are not bubbles accumulating in the nipple.

The Avent bottle is a simple and effective design. There are four parts: (1) nipple, (2) cap, (3) vent ring and (4) bottle. The proprietary design of the vent ring, cap and nipple allow for air to enter the bottle without forcing the baby to open his mouth and possibly ingest air. I also like the "wide mouth" design which makes it easy to clean.

You'll read about the leaks. Baloney. If my wife can assemble it correctly at 3am with out leaks then so can you! : ) Just read the instructions.

Final note: you'll find another version that costs about 20% more. I believe the only difference is the construction of the bottle (a heavier plastic or glass). Save your money and buy these instead.
0Comment17 of 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on October 21, 2009
For our first baby born in July '07, we used (and loved) the original Polycarbonate Avent bottles the first few months. Then the BPA paranoia overtook us, and we switched to Born Free bottles, which are made of honey-colored Polyether Sulphone (PES). The Born Free bottles worked well enough, but we hated the 2 extra complicated parts per bottle that we had to clean. For our second kid born in Sept '09, we wanted badly to switch back to Avent, but read poor reviews of the PES BPA-free Avent bottles (apparently they leaked for many users). Fortunately, right around that time, Avent introduced a second line of BPA-free bottles made of the cloudy Polypropylene (PPE), and initial reviews indicated that Avent fixed the leaks (by adding a simple removable collar between the bottle and nipple). After 1 month of using these new PPE Avent bottles, I can attest that they indeed don't leak, and I don't need to take special care or do any procedure to make them leak-free. They just don't leak. Yes, the newly added collar is an extra part to clean, but at least it's a simple part that's easy to clean. So for all you Avent fans out there, take heart! Avent fixed the leaks. Tip: the leaky PES honey-colored bottles come in yellow-colored boxes. The new leak-free PPE cloudy bottles come in blue-colored boxes. Buy the blue-colored boxes.
0Comment20 of 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 20, 2009
I have been using Avent bottles for 2 1/2 years. With the original bottles (with BPA) we had occasional leaks of a few drops but otherwise we were very happy. When the orange-tinted BPA free bottles came out we got those, and had more leaks. In fact with #2 flow nipples the leaks were unbearable. We called Avent and they sent us 2 of these new polypropylene bottles to try before they were even in stores. The top of the bottle is a little shorter and there's an extra ring that you put onto the bottle before you put the nipple on. I have no idea how that helps, but it doesn't leak at all!! As soon as I saw them in stores I ran out and bought more.
These bottles take the same nipples as the other Avent bottles, so there aren't any compatibility issues. The only potential downside is that polypropylene is a softer plastic so over time these may get scratched up.
22 comments12 of 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon October 5, 2010
You just have to make sure you screw the lid on tight enough. I have to admit that I've had them leak a few times when I didn't. That's my fault and not the bottle's.

Make sure you get the ones in the blue box. I got two amber colored bottles included with my Philips AVENT BPA Free ISIS iQ Duo Twin Electric Breast Pump, White. They do leak horribly.

These make for an easy transition between breast and bottle. The wide mouth makes her sucking look more like what she does on the breast than other bottles. It also makes them easy to clean.

I like how the air enters the bottle under the ring and not through the nipple. She doesn't have to let go and let air enter. The bottle lets her keep sucking. That's a life saver considering my baby doesn't really like to eat and anything that interrupts her is a problem.

Edit: After 4 months our daughter was still having gas problems. Our pediatrician suggested we try Dr. Brown's. We tried it and her gas problem was reduced drastically. Knowing what I know now, I would go with Dr. Brown's. Hind sight is 20/20!
0Comment5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 25, 2009
There are alot of negative reviews for these bottles. Let me start by saying THESE DO NOT LEAK. There are two types of Avent bottles. 1 Leaks horribly and 1 doesnt. These do not. The ones that leak are the yellow box with golden nipples. These come in a blue box and have clear nipples. These bottles are great and we havent had any leaks yet. AVOID THE YELLOW ONES BUT BUY THESE!!!
0Comment5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 27, 2011
We have been using the polypropylene bottles since shortly after birth for out 7-month old. We started with the 4 oz size and are currently using this 9oz size.
This bottle is relatively easy to clean with 4 main parts. Typically we wash everything in the dishwasher, but in a pinch, it is not difficult to hand-wash.
In 7 months, we have not had a single leaking bottle when assembled correctly. It is easy to teach assembly and cleaning to grandma and other babysitters.

My wife breastfeeds, but is in school full time and has to pump. We are constantly switching between bottle and breastfeeding. My wife was worried at first after hearing many stories of babies developing a preference for the bottle and refusing to breastfeed anymore.
Our baby still uses both just fine. Taking a tip from another mom, we kept the nipple one size smaller than the age recommendation so that the baby wouldn't start preferring the easier-flowing nipples on the bottle over breastfeeding.
Once he started teething, he started showing a preference for the breast, but he still drinks from the bottle just fine whenever mom is not home.

Make sure you get the clear bottles in the blue box (PP) and not the yellow-tinted bottles in the yellow box (PES); those leak horribly.
0Comment6 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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