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Philo T Farnsworth Hardcover – July 13, 2001


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 328 pages
  • Publisher: University of Utah Press; 1st Edition edition (July 13, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0874806755
  • ISBN-13: 978-0874806755
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,430,398 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Godfrey has done both the inventor and all historians of television a considerable service."—Christopher H. Sterling, George Washington University



"A major work about a major television inventor."—Albert Abramson, author of The History of Television, 1880–1941



"It is a must read for those involved in early television broadcasting and for those with a passion for reading interesting biographies, corporate histories, or compelling stories about real people, their inventions and creations."—Tim Larson, University of Utah


More About the Author

Donald G. Godfrey is an electronic media educator, a professional broadcaster, and a historian. He is a Past President of the national Broadcast Education Association (BEA); served as President of the National Council of Communication Associations (CCA); and a Past-Editor of the "Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media." He was founding Chair for the BEA Festival of Media Arts and the BEA Research & Symposium Committees. He was Curator of the CBS-KIRO Milo Ryan Phonoarchive, a CBS Radio News World War II archive, today at the National Archive, Washington, D.C. He past Director and Founder of the ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism Doctoral Program. He received his degrees from Weber State University, the University of Oregon and the University of Washington.

Dr. Godfrey retired in 2012, Professor Emeritus, after twenty-four years on the faculty of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and forty-two years in teaching and research.

His academic research includes refereed publications in all the major journals of the discipline. He has written and edited several books. Dr. Godfrey says his greatest reward is still teaching, "I simply enjoy watching my students grow." His professional interests include electronic media history and the history of the American and Canadian West.

He lives with his wife in southern Arizona near Phoenix writing from his home office close to his four children and twelve grandchildren.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By M&William Tienken on August 5, 2001
Format: Hardcover
When Philo T. Farnsworth was fifteen, and plowing a field, he thougth up the concept that became electronic television. After one year of college, Farnsworth started repairing radio and then got support in the 1920s to develop electronic television. The only competition he faced was RCA and RCA tried to stop him. What followed were years of intense work and bitter frustrations. But in the end, Fransworth was proven to be the creator of television. Although forgotten today, this biography brings back to the public the importance of Philo T. Farnsworth and how the technology he developed back in the 1920s is till used today. An excellent read.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Bill on September 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
While Godfrey has compiled, and reasonably well organized a great deal of information, his written presentation lacks style and readibility. The quality of writing is what one might expect from a newly-minted PhD attempting to gain recognition by publishing his/her dissertaion. I could not recommend this book to anyone looking for a general Farnsworth biography. For the occasional advanced undergraduate or graduate student studying the history of technology, I would recommend it for its reference value.
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By Alan Douglas on February 11, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
More scholarly than the three other biographies that appeared at about the same time, which all had axes to grind.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 11, 2004
Format: Hardcover
but it doesn't change the truth. Unless you believe the teacher lied (and I have never heard that suggested or demonstrated) you have no basis for an assumption that Farnsworth did not invent the essential element of electronic tv. And Sarnoff, as well as Zworykin, are known to have (to be polite) exaggerated their deeds and discoveries.
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1 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 27, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The book is a lie. Farnsworth did not invent television. Television was around before Farnsworth was born. Other inventors' patents were used by RCA, notably Kalman Tihanyi, who patented the iconoscope in 1928.
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