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Philosophical Grammar: Part I, the Proposition, and Its Sense, Part II, On Logic and Mathematics Hardcover – June, 1974

ISBN-13: 978-0520026643 ISBN-10: 0520026640 Edition: First Edition

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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 495 pages
  • Publisher: Univ of California Pr; First Edition edition (June 1974)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520026640
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520026643
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,029,217 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"There is much in this book that is both important and more clearly stated than elsewhere in his 'later philosophy.'"--"Georgia Review --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Text: English, German (translation)

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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By J.F. Quackenbush on July 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
certain other reviewers of this book may have missed the point. Not that it isn't okay to miss the point from time to time, Sometimes it's a good thing to miss the point, but its not very useful in a book review. The short reason as to why this book is worth reading is because it was edited by Rush Rhees who has a different point of view on Wittgenstein than many of his other literary executors which is worth being exposed to. The mid-sized reason is that this is "Middle Period" Wittgenstein, and it is interesting to watch a great mind question itself in the way that Wittgenstein is beginning to do here. The long reason is that there are ideas here that are referenced in the Late Wittgenstein and which shed light on the ideas Wittgenstein comes to in On Certainty, Philosophical Investigations, and Zettel.

So in short, pay no attention to reviewers who lack the background to understand what this book is for, or who don't know how to read a book like this. If you've not yet been exposed to Wittgenstein, don't start here. Read Philosophical Investigations and On Certainty first. Read the Blue and Brown Books. Browse through Zettel and Philosophical Remarks. Those all contain a more cohesive picture of the man's thought. For people with some background on Wittgenstein looking for more to ponder, well, that's what I got from this book. And it's valuable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven H Propp TOP 50 REVIEWER on October 6, 2014
Format: Paperback
Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (1889-1951) was an Austrian-British philosopher whose books such as Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus and Philosophical Investigations are among the acknowledged “classics” of 20th century philosophy. Born into a wealthy family, he gave all of his inheritance away, served in the Austrian Army during World War I, taught schoolchildren in remote Austrian villages, but ultimately taught at Cambridge for many years. The Tractatus was the only book he published during his lifetime, but his papers have been posthumously edited, and notes of lectures taken by his students have been transcribed, and have resulted in many published books, such as Lectures & Conversations on Aesthetics, Psychology, & Religious Belief, On Certainty, Philosophical Remarks, The Blue and Brown Books, Remarks on the Foundations of Mathematics, ...Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Loren C. Gruber on June 1, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ludwig Wittgenstein explores the "boundaries of language," which have prompted late twentieth century scholars to deconstruct literary texts, much in the same way that Pablo Picasso deconstructed the human form and e. e. cummings (sic) deconstructed sonnets, paired common words to create jarring meanings ("stinkbrag," "mothermonster"), approximated pronunciation ("ygUDuh"), or painted word pictures (cummings was also a painter), as in his poem that portrays a leaf falling (l).

Put another way, Wittgenstein pushes us to reconsider how language means, how language stretches (toward new) meaning, how language doesn't mean.

He does so in a logical, step-by-step, outlined fashioned.

Wittgenstein's work is not for the casual or timid reader.

So don't expect to pick up Philosophical Grammar and read it in one sitting. His dense writing prevents such a practice, but more importantly Wittgenstein gives the serious reader a reason to read and re-read the book as the wonder of words and grammar unfold like a blossoming flower--but in a taxonomic fashion.
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1 of 14 people found the following review helpful By roberto leon on December 29, 2001
Format: Hardcover
like all his works logic is the most remarkable issue
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1 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Lee D. Carlson HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 31, 2003
Format: Paperback
Once feature of this book that is always fascinating is that one can take any paragraph in it and generate a plethora of ideas and commentary, that might even fill volumes. This book is not unique in that regard, but in fact most books of philosophy have this characteristic. They allow the mind to go forth untamed and engage in speculations that are unconstrained by experience or laboratory experiments. Philosophical reasoning is to be distinguished therefore by its freedom to say and write what it pleases, unlike the case for scientific reasoning, which is highly constrained by observation and experiment. There are some interesting points made in this book, some of them having intersection with what is now going on in artificial intelligence, computational grammar, and linguistics. Readers can also gain insight into the school of logical atomism, which the author was of course very much a part of.
The book is organized as a collection of disjointed paragraphs, which little or no correlation between them. Many of them are quite interesting and thought-provoking, especially if read in the context of the field of artificial intelligence. It is doubtful though that any of these ideas could be refined in such a way as to make them useful in the goal of building thinking machines. They are just too loosely structured to be codified in a language that would run on a machine. Speculative ideas unfortunately are like that. The ideas in the book might perhaps though put one in a certain frame of mind that would permit more acceptance of various claims made in artificial intelligence. Conversely, it might very well increase the doubt on those claims. Such is the nature of philosophical grammar: its expressive power and rich information content permits a wide range of interpretations.
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