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Philosophy: An Introduction to the Art of Wondering Paperback – May 11, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0534512507 ISBN-10: 053451250X Edition: 9th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 672 pages
  • Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing; 009 edition (May 11, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 053451250X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0534512507
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 8.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,409,747 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This undergraduate textbook, originally published in 1973, also holds a good deal of appeal for adult readers. Christian believes that philosophy is critical thinking about the "Big Picture." He thus addresses the concerns that most people "wonder" about: Does life have meaning? Does God exist? How do you know right from wrong? and so on. Christian has also filled the book with interesting sidebars, illustrations, and relevant cartoons. This is philosophy made intelligible and fun.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"the most reader-friendly text available."

"Other strengths of the Christian text are the marginal tidbits of wisdom and the broad, synoptic view of philosophy it presents."

"I have found that my students relate better to Christian's material and style than to his competitors. I support Christian's invitation to students to develop their own philosophy on key issues by discovering what "the great ones" have thought about the key issues of philosophy."

"Christian does seem to do an excellent job highlighting the philosophical concerns of almost every conceivable discipline. Christian shows how the concerns of sociologists, psychologists, biologists, physicists, chemists, and anthropologists are inseparable from the concerns and interests of philosophers."

"Non-Western perspectives are treated with the respect and the seriousness they deserve, but are also held to critical scrutiny (something my current text does not do very well). I like that the book ends with this section. It provides a sense of closure and the final exercise questions require the student to step back and consider this new experience of philosophy not as an intellectual exercise, but as something vital to a meaningful life." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Great book, using it for my philosophy class.
Taylor Moore
Other helps include a glossary of terms as well as an index and a list of bibliographic citations.
Dr. Jonathan Dolhenty
I have given many copies of this book to friends.
M. Kelley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Jonathan Dolhenty on February 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
I am delighted to be able to recommend Dr. Christian's 9th edition of his classic "Philosophy: An Introduction to the Art of Wondering" to all those interested in uncovering what the study of formal philosophy is all about. While this textbook is primarily targeted toward college students engaged in their first confrontation with the discipline of philosophical thought, I think it is also an excellent introduction for the philosophically-inclined high school student and the mature adult who wants to involve himself or herself in continuing self-education. I used the 2nd edition of this textbook with my students in an introductory course in philosophy which I taught back in the 1970s. I thought the textbook was excellent then; it is even better now with some added features not in the edition I used.

This is not your all-too-common dry, dull philosophy textbook. One of the things stressed in Christian's book is that the study of philosophy is not so much a matter of subject-matter or content as it is an "intellectual adventure," a practical pursuit, a dynamic enterprise, something one "does" rather than simply study some static material with little relevance to daily life. "By its very nature," according to Christian, "philosophy is a do-it-yourself enterprise." Furthermore, "Philosophy...is a method" and "Doing philosophy is an endless activity." How true that is! I have been "doing" serious philosophy since I was about fourteen years old, much to the discomfort of many of my high school teachers. So difficult was I in asking vexing questions of the teacher, that once I was simply told to "Sit down and shut up, or get out!" (Well, philosophers and serious students of philosophy have never been particularly popular or welcome during their lifetimes.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Johannes Platonicus on January 5, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I used this textbook in my Intro to Philosophy course and found its contents to impact and significantly broaden my philosophical views. Like any modern philosophical textbook, its contents are strictly modern and very little attention is paid to the ancient Greek/Hellenistic tradition or to the Medieval/Renaissance tradition. As an introductory guide, shouldn't students become well-acquainted with the origins of Philosophy? Nonetheless, brief lip-service is rendered to the progenitors of western thought; and this might suffice for anyone not deeply concerned with Classical/Medieval/Renaissance philosophy. Now the textual apparatus includes detailed and well organized chapters, with pithy quotes from renowned philosophers, from both the Occidental and Oriental traditions. On top of all of this, on nearly every page lies colorful, and many times humourous cartoons, that relate to humanity and man's quest for wisdom. At the end of every chapter are detailed biographies of the many philosophers who have left their mark upon the world thought. At the end rests an intricate and definitive glossary, which proves very useful while studying this text. Overall, this textbook is a fantastic primer for Modern/Contemporary philosophy, while it nearly disregards the twenty-three hundred years of thought that formed it.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Gerald Ludwig on December 9, 2004
Format: Hardcover
And, of course, we used his text book for the course. If there was one word that I would think most describes this book, it would "unbiased", so I don't really know what that previous reviewer was talking about (maybe Christainity?). Anyway, I found this book to be very funny, interesting, thoughtprovoking, and the only thing really wrong with it is that we don't know the answers to almost any really revelant question. But, I agree, and I think James would say, that that doesn't mean we shouldn't think about them.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Jonathan Dolhenty on February 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
I am delighted to be able to recommend Dr. Christian's 9th edition of his classic "Philosophy: An Introduction to the Art of Wondering" to all those interested in uncovering what the study of formal philosophy is all about. While this textbook is primarily targeted toward college students engaged in their first confrontation with the discipline of philosophical thought, I think it is also an excellent introduction for the philosophically-inclined high school student and the mature adult who wants to involve himself or herself in continuing self-education. I used the 2nd edition of this textbook with my students in an introductory course in philosophy which I taught back in the 1970s. I thought the textbook was excellent then; it is even better now with some added features not in the edition I used.

This is not your all-too-common dry, dull philosophy textbook. One of the things stressed in Christian's book is that the study of philosophy is not so much a matter of subject-matter or content as it is an "intellectual adventure," a practical pursuit, a dynamic enterprise, something one "does" rather than simply study some static material with little relevance to daily life. "By its very nature," according to Christian, "philosophy is a do-it-yourself enterprise." Furthermore, "Philosophy...is a method" and "Doing philosophy is an endless activity." How true that is! I have been "doing" serious philosophy since I was about fourteen years old, much to the discomfort of many of my high school teachers. So difficult was I in asking vexing questions of the teacher, that once I was simply told to "Sit down and shut up, or get out!" (Well, philosophers and serious students of philosophy have never been particularly popular or welcome during their lifetimes.
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