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Philosophy in Crisis: The Need for Reconstruction (Prometheus Lecture Series) Hardcover – January 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: Prometheus Lecture Series
  • Hardcover: 245 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books; 1St Edition edition (January 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573928437
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573928434
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,012,410 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

The ever-crusading Bunge here argues that "all the philosophical schools are in ruins" including Aristotelianism, Thomism, Kantianism, Hegelianism, dialectical materialism, positivism, pragmatism, phenomenology, and linguistic philosophy. His own solution is a kind of materialism that allows for the emergence of minds and societies as entities with distinct properties. He has long been professor of logic and metaphysics at McGill, and he draws on his many books to lay down much that is sensible and humane. Readers will enjoy some of his attacks on the woollier social sciences and the dafter deconstructionists and metaphysicians. But some will think his definition of "matter" as what is located and "can be in at least two different states" allows him to win too easily, like a man who adds 20 wild cards to a solitaire deck. "Matter" then includes by definition everything except things like the number two and infinity. (Is love material, and don't the friends of Cantor and Goedel who think we need the infinite and must accept the existence of all the numbers have a point?) Much of Bunge's concern is with locating the social sciences and philosophy in relation to the natural sciences. As in his recent The Sociology-Philosophy Connection (Transaction, 1999), he denounces his opponents as lacking brainpower without giving them much of an argument. This work is flawed, but it is an important book that deserves a place in any substantial academic library. Leslie Armour. Univ. of Ottawa
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"...an important book that deserves a place in any substantial academic library." -- Library Journal, March 1, 2001

"...survey of competing ontologies, philosophies of mind, approaches to the sciences, ethical theories, and more." -- Choice, January 2002

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lester M. Stacey on January 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Industrious individuals know that after a disaster the first order of business is to clear away the debris and then begin to plan for reconstruction.

Just accepting the implications of the failures of philosophy can be a disaster. One's cherished beliefs can feel threatened. It is easier and safer to refuse to accept the fact that philosophy could ever fail.

And yet, the evidence of the disaster philosophy has become mounts daily. The scandal worsens.

Humans turn in desperation to philosophy only to find a crisis underway. There is no agreement about the most fundamental principles. It is a hopeless situation.

With the exception of philosophical realism.

Defining a problem is a crucial step in the direction of formulating a potential solution.

This book defines the problem at the root of philosophy and provides guidelines for its positive reconstruction.

This is a realistic basis for hope.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By KarlaC on September 4, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bough this book for my college assignment. Although I am not into philosophy I got the chance to actually enjoy the book. I needed to understand it carefully because it was for an assignment but if you just want it to be a relax book to read I still recommend it!
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