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Philosophy of Mind and Cognition Hardcover – November 14, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-0631191674 ISBN-10: 0631191674 Edition: 1st
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Editorial Reviews

Review

'... a very thorough volume: almost every topic falling under the mind/body problem is taken up and addressed in an up-to-date fashion.' -- Professor William G. Lycan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Book Description

This is a fully revised and updated edition of David Braddon-Mitchell and Frank Jacksonrsquo;s popular and respected introduction to philosophy of mind and cognition. The revisions are designed to make the volume even more useful for teachers and students, and to keep it current, ensuring that the most recent developments in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science are brought together into a coherent, accessible whole. New material includes: a section on some of Descartesrsquo; famous objections to materialism along with a discussion of the objection from Gouml;del's theorem; substantial additions to the discussion of qualia including a discussion of representationalist accounts of experience and of the zombie argument; additional coverage of the view that psychology is autonomous; a new substantial chapter on connectionism and its bearing on the language of thought debate; and much more. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (November 14, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0631191674
  • ISBN-13: 978-0631191674
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,878,878 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert Jones on April 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
Rather than treating Philosophy and Psychology as diverse subjects it is quite refreshing to see that there are still authors who introduce the subject of the mind to students of Psychology as the deep and absorbing subject that it really is, and show that they do still walk hand in hand, no matter how scientific one of them may have become. Even though David Braddon-Mitchell and Frank Jackson appear to assume that their readers have a grounding in Philosophy as well as Psychology, they do so in a way which would encourage a mere novice to widen their knowledge, this will therefore make the subject of Psychology far more interesting and forfilling, and thereby make the complicated subject of the Human Mind more clear. It is additionally encouraging by the inclusion of a comprehensive glossary so eliminating over-referencing like other texts, but at the same time leads inquisitive students into fresh fields where they can 'graze' on the klnowledge of the subject to their heart's content. Each school of Philosophy is clearly expalined and compared to it's sister, and subjectively ctitisied. It moves from the pre-history of contemporary Philosophy of Mind - Dualism and Behaviourism, and early versions of the identity theory of mind, through discussions on functionalism in its many varieties, consciousness and quili, instrumentalism and the autonomy of Psychology, to topics such as eleminative materialism, individualism and the problems of content and representation. The text according to the authors, was viewed by students of the Philosophy of Psychology before printing, this gives an air of originality to the book, which in turn would be an ideal undertaking for other authors of literature relating to the ever complex subject of Psychology.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Metaphysician on April 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
I used this text as a student while at the University of Auckland.

At times I found the text woefully unclear. For instance, from pages 68 through 83, the authors delve into a brief excursus on the philosophy of language and a theory of reference. Their explication of the causal-historical theory is unclear at best, and seems to delve too quickly into the pros and cons of the theory without first explaining it in any depth.

At other points I found myself going back over sections of text 4 and 5 times before I finally latched onto the concept at hand, even then it was with the aid of articles on the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

In sum, I do not recommend this text. Jaegwon Kim's text book aptly titled "Philosophy of Mind" is *MUCH* better.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Elm on August 10, 2012
Format: Paperback
I first used this book as an undergraduate. I found the text very poorly written: it is both horribly unclear and badly organized. Later, I had to use the book as a teaching assistant for a philosophy of mind course. My initial impression has only been reconfirmed. My students had great difficulty following the book, and relied largely on lectures for understanding. Even I had to read portions several times for understanding, if only because the authors' writing style is so graceless and clunky.

In short: not recommended for students, or for teachers. Braddon-Mitchell and Jackson are horrible writers. After some work from a talented non-philosopher editor, maybe this book would be worth a look.
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10 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I feel more than able to comment on this book, as a current student of Braddon-Mitchell's - Philosophy of the Mind course, run at the University of Sydney, Australia. Not only that, but I'm using it as a reference this instant in writing some research material.
This is of course a good reference for students but it has its flaws. I would not wholeheartedly recommend it to the novice philosopher or undergrad student. Not before browsing some other materials.
The book itself is based almost wholly on the way that David would run his course. In fact it does, they mirror one another almost totally. I have followed the course and examined the book and they coincide more than neatly. Whilst this is essentially dynamic, this is where its imperfections may show themselves.
As a lecturer might, there is philosophical bias and a tendency to forget that the subject matter itself is not independent. One might feel at times, that you are being taught the Right theory. There are critiques, but standing from an established point of analysis. I do not feel that it is engaging as Braddon-Mitchell is in his courses and certainly, it can be swamped in some vague sentences. It will require close reading or a good background in the discipline.
It is comprehensive book though, very in depth and reaching to the full extent, matters of cognition. I provide my criticism not to attack the book, but often with reviews, all that is mentioned is its content.
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