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The Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey, Or, Africa for the Africans (The New Marcus Garvey Library, No. 9) Paperback – November, 1986


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Our Kids by Robert D. Putnam
Our Kids by Robert D. Putnam
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Originally published in the 1920s, this is the standard edition of the black leader's writings.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

A man who stands without equal in the history of the worldwide mobilization of African peoples. For Marcus Garvey did not merely organize the most massive Black movement in the history of the United States of America. He also organized the largest and most successful movement among African people in the Caribbean.
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Product Details

  • Series: The New Marcus Garvey Library, No. 9 (Book 9)
  • Paperback: 412 pages
  • Publisher: Majority Pr (November 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0912469242
  • ISBN-13: 978-0912469249
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #117,932 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Taalib A. Muhammad on October 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
In compiling this book, Mrs. Garvey has succeeded in revealing the true mindset of one of the greatest Black leaders of the 20th century. By presenting Marcus Garvey's actual letters, speeches and writings, we are granted the privilege of reading HIS OWN WORDS, instead of yet another author's interpretation. Additionally, I was very pleased that the book explained the actions of those who conspired to thwart Garvey's efforts (many of whom he actually mentions by name) and the conditions that effectuated his eventual deportation. I found this writing especially useful in understanding Garvey's true feelings regarding the N.A.A.C.P. and W.E.B. DuBois, as well as his views on racism, Pan-Africanism, and how peoples of all races can co-exist in peace. An absolute MUST READ for any student of the Great Marcus Garvey, and his lifelong effort to improve the conditions of Black people around the world!
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is truly a classic of Black literature. The first half of the book contains very constructive advice on living and self-determination regardless of color. The second half gets into his organization the UNIA with some actual documents. The "Declaration of the Rights of the Negro" (1920) is the blueprint for many of the anti-colonial movements to come. My only problem with the book is the occasionally divisive comments about light-skinned Blacks in his discussion of the destruction of his movement. Other than that, it's great reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jacques COULARDEAU on November 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This old book does not represent a constructed and well balanced presentation of Garvey’s ideas, but rather a selection of many small excerpts, each one under s small title. Apart from some speeches at the end of the volume, and we cannot say whether these speeches are unabridged or full, everything else is tit bits of thinking in any haphazard jumble. We then have to extract a philosophy out of this patchwork.

These documents all have a unity in the fact that they are all from the Harlem period in Marcus Garvey’s life. He arrived in Harlem in 1916, coming from Jamaica. His problems with justice started as sson as 1922. He will find himself in prison in 1926 and will be deported back to Jamaica in 1927. He founded with some others the Universal N**** Improvement Association and organized the First International Convention of the N**** Peoples of the World that lasted thirty days in 1920 with a mass rally in Madison Square Garden that brought together more than 25,000 people. Internationally he arrived in Harlem when the USA entered the War in Europe and moved many blacks from the south to the north to work in the war industry. Then this period (1916-1922) covers the end the war and the great changes that occurred in the world then and just after, particularly the Soviet revolution in 1917 that is actually referred to in the volume as being led by Lenin and Trotsky.

This mention of Lenin and Trotsky is important because the very first principle that emerges from this volume is that he has recuperated his main central concept from the Marxist catechism that was triumphing in Russia, and he has only replaced the word “class” in “class struggle” by the word “race” to produce a vision of everything in the world as being a “race struggle.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Stanley Mliwa on March 10, 2008
Format: Paperback
The book is highly educative and motivational.I compare it to the book think and grow rich a black choice by Dennis Kimbro. I recommend it to all blacks and those seekers of garveysm.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the greatest collections I've read. Marcus Garvey had one goal, the unification and creation of a self sufficient black nation. With more than 1 billion people of African descent on this planet, we can be a great force on this planet. But as Mr. Garvey states in this book, "The greatest weapon used against the Negro is DISORGANIZATION."
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