The Philosophy of Science Fiction Film and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Philosophy of Science Fiction Film (The Philosophy of Popular Culture) Hardcover – December 14, 2007


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$52.00 $22.77

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Choose Your Own Autobiography
Step right into Neil Patrick Harris's shoes in an exciting, interactive autobiography that places the reader squarely in the driver's seat. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: The Philosophy of Popular Culture
  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: The University Press of Kentucky (December 14, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813124727
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813124728
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,276,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

""In The Philosophy of Science Fiction Film, Steven Sanders and company guide us through apocalyptic visions of robotic rampages and mysterious journeys through space and time, stopping along the way for philosophical snapshots that enhance the tour." --Eric Bronson, editor of Poker and Philosophy: Pocket Rockets and Philosopher Kin" --



""I can recommend this book to philosophy students and their teachers, along with the rest of us who are still searching to answers to the mystery of humanity and its place in the cosmos." --Armchair Interviews" --



""12 essays, all by outstanding film scholars, that offer a comprehensive overview of the subject. Recommended." -- R. Cormier, CHOICE" --



""The Philosophy of Science Fiction Film is a successful volume. Pedagogues, both of philosophy and of film, will find the book a useful compendium of ideas." --Neil Easterbrook, Science Fiction Studies" --



""The Philosophy of Science Fiction Film manages to be simultaneously a collection of thoughtful and engaging scholarly work and a collection of thoughtful and engaging scholarly work and a substantive and appealing discussion of many of the most compelling science fiction films. Readers who enjoy tracing science fiction's philosophical roots will find it extremely worthwhile reading." --Jo Ann Circosta, Rain Taxi" --



""The Philosophy of Science Fiction Film offers erudite insights that are thoughtful and thought-provoking, superb examples of scholarship, and a seminal contribution to the study of science fiction films." --thephilosopherschair.com, Midwest Book Review" --

From the Inside Flap

From Metropolis (1927) to The Matrix (1999), science fiction films have captivated audiences worldwide for more than seven decades. In recent years, philosophers have turned their eyes towards the same screen, attracted by the salient storylines, conflicts, and themes nestled amongst the new technologically and time altered landscapes. They have discovered that science fiction films offer more than an imaginative escape from the real world -- they also provide a rich medium through which to address issues of identity, consciousness, agency, space, time, causality, and other categories of experience.

Editor Steven M. Sanders argues that the appeal of science fiction films has led to a proliferation of misguided interpretations and weak arguments in the film criticism of the genre. The Philosophy of Science Fiction Film aims to restore integrity to science fiction film criticism by penetrating the surface of the films in order to unearth the presupposed philosophical arguments, ethical perspectives, and metaphysical views that underlie them.

The first section, "Enigmas of Identity and Agency" treats issues of identity, moral agency, and the meaning of being human in films such as Total Recall (1990), Blade Runner (1982), and Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956). In the second part, "Extraterrestrial Visitation, Time Travel, and Artificial Intelligence," contributors dissect such films as 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Terminator, and The Day the Earth Stood Still to examine the implications of new technology on civilization, the paradoxes surrounding artificial intelligence, and the possibilities offered by time travel. The final section, "Braver New World: Science Fiction Futurism" looks at Metropolis, The Matrix, Alphaville, and screen adaptations of Orwell's 1984 to analyze our visions of the future and humans' role in it.

The Philosophy of Science Fiction Film highlights the interconnectivity of the science fiction genre and philosophy. The contributing philosophers, film critics, and scholars highlight the relationship between philosophy and science fiction film, offering original philosophical perspectives on the logical possibility and paradoxes of personal identity, the nature of consciousness and artificial intelligence, time travel, encounters with extraterrestrials, and transformations of the future.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By bluejazz on December 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
When I began reading this book, I must admit that I was a bit hesitant about my own ability to be able to understand and appreciate its many nuances. And frankly, I was also a little suspicious of its intent, given the plethora of "Philosophy of ...[you name it]" books that have been appearing on the philosophy and popular culture shelves of bookstores everywhere in the last few years.

However, I plunged ahead. What I found was a tremendously varied and insightful volume that turned out to be both stimulating and enjoyable. Best of all, one does not have to be a philosopher or a hard-core science-fiction film buff to find Steven M. Sanders' volume so fulfilling.

Also, what sets this volume apart from other philosophy and popular culture texts I've perused is its immense readability. Editor/author Sanders has compiled a roster of contributors that present new and stimulating ideas about the relationship of philosophy and the science fiction film, in the most enlivening and comprehensible ways. The writing here is clear and insightful. Sanders' own introduction, as well as his essay on interpreting the concept of paranoia in the 1956 film, "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," is both illuminating and memorable.

Each essay takes a different science fiction film and holds it under a philosophical looking glass. After reading this book, I rented some of the films being discussed, and sure enough, I was afforded some new ways of looking at each film, even those I've seen many times over the years.

The University of Kentucky Press has given us a sure-fire winner of a book, and I recommend it without hesitation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Armchair Interviews on January 18, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The editor of this book, Steven M. Sanders, is Prof. Emeritus of Philosophy at Bridgewater State College, Mass.

This book breathes new life into some old doctrines. It is part of a series on the Philosophy of Popular Culture which takes a deeper look at some of the things we watch and enjoy.

Science fiction has always intrigued audiences, whether it predicts a titillating future or a dark one, and here the editor has collected essays from 13 other noted scholars, who look into popular films like "Blade Runner" and "Dark City," You'll recognize science fiction films new and old in here: "Total Recall, Metropolis," "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and "The Terminator"--to name a few.

The discussions range from searching the films with questions about what it means to be human, and what is the self and how do we identify ourselves as individuals?- to technology and ethics, and even paradoxes of time travel, in such films as "The Terminator" and "12 Monkeys." These classic questions of ancient philosophy are wood for the fires of the new philosophies like existentialism and nihilism--which find science fiction film a great source for speculation.

That this book exists at all is a joy to me, who has heard the science fiction genre dismissed as irrelevant and not applicable to modern life--even when it was most of modern life which the genre predicted! I know a few critics who could stand to read it immediately.

I can recommend this book to philosophy students and their teachers, along with the rest of us who are still searching to answers to the mystery of humanity and its place in the cosmos.

Armchair Interviews agrees.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on January 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Expertly compiled and edited by Steven M. Sanders (emeritus Professor of Philosophy, Bridgewater State College, Massachusetts), "The Philosophy Of Science Fiction Film" focuses upon science fiction films in terms of their philosophical implications and issues including 'Engimas of Identity and Agency'; 'Extraterrestrial Visitation, Time Travel, and Artificial Intelligence; and Brave Newer World: Science Fiction Futurism. From Deborah Knight and George McKnight's 'What Is It to Be Human? Blade Runner and Dark City'; to Aeon J. Skoble's 'Technology and Ethics in The Day the Earth Stood Still'; to Jerold J. Abrams' 'The Dialectic of Enlightenment in Metropolis, "The Philosophy Of Science Fiction Film" offers erudite insights that are thoughtful and thought-provoking, superb examples of scholarship, and a seminal contribution to the study of science fiction films. "The Philosophy Of Science Fiction Film" is highly recommended for academic library collections, as well as the supplemental reading lists for students and non-specialist general readers with an interest in Cinematic Studies, Science Fiction & Fantasy, and Philosophy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By mike on August 9, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Don't let the title scare you off. It's well written and and easy to read. If you are a film student, like me, or a science fiction fan, you won't be disappointed. If you have not seen the films mentioned in the book i suggest you do so before reading it to put things into context.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard Gross on July 15, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Book was fairly priced and as described. I will use it as an aid for a course I teach in the relationship between science and film.

Incidentally, Amazon, it is profoundly stupid to require a certain number of words in a purchase review. If you want me to review my purchases, don't tell me how to do it. Otherwise, I won't.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?