Customer Reviews


5 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent introduction to philosophy through film
In the last decade or so a number of philosophers have become interested in film, both as a way of illustrating difficult concepts in philosophy and as a medium with a rich potential for the development of philosophical thought. Mary Litch's "Philosophy through Film" was one of the first and remains one of the best and most useful textbooks for introducing students to...
Published on August 7, 2007 by Nathan Andersen

versus
1 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fresh air please.
The book was in good condition for a used paperback except for one thing... It smelled like cigar smoke so bad I had to hold it as far away from me as possible while reading. The smell made it hard to enjoy this well written book, and my stomach turns just thinking about it. If I knew the book smelled this way I would have bought a different one. The price was very...
Published on June 13, 2011 by college


Most Helpful First | Newest First

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent introduction to philosophy through film, August 7, 2007
In the last decade or so a number of philosophers have become interested in film, both as a way of illustrating difficult concepts in philosophy and as a medium with a rich potential for the development of philosophical thought. Mary Litch's "Philosophy through Film" was one of the first and remains one of the best and most useful textbooks for introducing students to philosophical concepts by way of film, and uses ideas drawn from philosophy to help analyze films that raise important questions about the nature of human identity, the character of knowledge, and ethical and existential questions about how we live. The format is especially helpful. Each chapter introduces a central philosophical theme and raises several of the issues that surround this theme, and then illustrates the theme with a brief account of two or three contemporary and easily accessible films that raise issues related to this theme. The final part of the chapter presumes that students will have gone on to view the film for the first time, or once again with the specific thematic issues of the chapter in mind. She then gives a detailed summary of each film to suggest how the film raises and resolves such issues and examines what is at stake in the way the film seems to resolve this issue. So, for example, a chapter on personal identity -- the question what makes a person who he or she is -- is complemented by analyses of the films Being John Malkovich and Memento. A chapter on epistemology -- the question how we know what we know and whether we can have knowledge at all -- is complemented by analyses of "Total Recall" and "The Matrix." Overall, it is a fine book that is well written and clear -- and while I may disagree with some of her emphases and wish she had discussed certain subjects more or less, the overall presentation is compelling and interesting. Something she doesn't do, but that other philosophers have begun to do in a number of books, is raise questions about the nature of film itself and whether and to what extent it is a medium uniquely suited for the expression or exploration of philosophical ideas. Even more, whether film itself might be said to be a medium for philosophy and not merely a useful illustration of philosophical concepts. I use this as a text in my course entitled Film and Philosophy to introduce students to the methods of philosophy, and especially to make relevant some of the seemingly abstract debates that take place within ethics, epistemology and metaphysics. I supplement this with discussions and readings in aesthetics to raise the question what is distinctive to film as a medium, and to raise questions that go beyond film as an illustration of philosophy and in the direction of the "philosophy of film." I'd love to see Mary Litch come out with a new edition of this excellent text, and expect to keep using it for some time.

UPDATE: a new edition of Philosophy through Film has been published, including discussions of more films and additional topics, as well as a brief but valuable introduction to issues surrounding the "philosophy of film."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very informative book, July 14, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Philosophy Through Film (Paperback)
I bought this book for my philosophy class at college. I had neither interest nor knowledge about philosophy prior to this class. But the book made it easy for me to enter philosophical world, it was not that boring as I thought. Overall a good book for beginner of philosophy, very throughly explained and informative.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars intellectual exercise!, January 20, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Philosophy Through Film (Paperback)
I absolutely recommend this book. Those who seek books to expand your perception in life, this book is a must.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Quality, January 30, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Philosophy Through Film (Paperback)
This product arrived in great condition and was exactly as discribed. Arrived on time and undamaged. I highly recomend this seller.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fresh air please., June 13, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The book was in good condition for a used paperback except for one thing... It smelled like cigar smoke so bad I had to hold it as far away from me as possible while reading. The smell made it hard to enjoy this well written book, and my stomach turns just thinking about it. If I knew the book smelled this way I would have bought a different one. The price was very reasonable though so even though I didn't like it I rated it three stars overall.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Philosophy Through Film
Philosophy Through Film by Mary M. Litch (Paperback - January 27, 2010)
$46.95 $40.66
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.