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Phoenix, Vol. 1: Dawn Paperback – February 26, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 344 pages
  • Publisher: VIZ Media LLC; 1st Edition edition (February 26, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569318689
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569318683
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 5.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #683,814 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Osamu Tezuka (1928-89) is the godfather of Japanese manga comics. He originally intended to become a doctor and earned his degree before turning to what was then a medium for children. His many early masterpieces include the series known in the U.S. as Astro Boy. With his sweeping vision, deftly interwined plots, feel for the workings of power, and indefatigable commitment to human dignity, Tezuka elevated manga to an art form. The later Tezuka, who authored Buddha, often had in mind the mature readership that manga gained in the sixties and that had only grown ever since. The Kurosawa of Japanese pop culture, Osamu Tezuka is a twentieth century classic.

Customer Reviews

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If you can see it from this way and draw a parallel to our own existence, you'd be enlightened.
-Ashi-
My conversation with a japanese friend who read both editions revealed that the translation was a good as could be expected between two such different languages.
G. Bahlman
I received again the other four books, but not this one, the only one I still needed; and they charged me again for the books.
Ornitorrinco

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By -Ashi- on March 4, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very special manga and a piece of literature. First of all, for those who have never read a Tezuka manga, you'd be distracted by the inferiority of the artwork by today's standard. By if you can ignore that, you'll find the storyline is one of the greatest achievements in literary history.

The entire series is shifting between past and future. And the interval between time will become smaller and smaller. For example, the story started from pre-historical Japan, then shift to circa 3000 AD in the future, but the jump between time will become shorter as it goes.

The series is incomplete, due to Tezuka's untimely death, though in other sense, it's completed because I think Tezuka probably knew he probably didn't have time to finish it, so the last published chapter already nailed the point that you can't really miss.

Each episodic story is clearly told, but once you began try to link the point of each story, you'd realize it's actually a collage of pictures with a repeating theme that tries to tell you about this vicious cycle of life. Every story is essentially the same, about how human being overwhelmed by their own greed and do stupid things over and over, disregard the passage of time.

So what's the main conflict? There are some side stories, but all the core stories are united with this Phoenix figure, which essentialy the god figure of the story. The Phoenix is immortal. According to the legend, anyone who drinks her blood, will become immortal as well. That's our conflict. People will do stupid things and kill each other just to become immortal (or become god-like).

Anyways, the original title of the series is called "Hi no Tori", which literally means Bird of Fire in Japanese.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By G. Bahlman on September 27, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are reading this, you are probably already familiar with Osamu Tezuka's work. There is little need to discuss the quality of the stories and art contained within as most agree that Tezuka is without peer. Having said that, I wanted to point out some strange things about these english editions.
First of all, I have looked through the first five volumes of the original Japanese first run printings. I say "looked" as I can't read japanese. The first thing I noticed about these english editions are the size, they are significantly smaller than the originals. However, the new printings seem to be on better quality paper.
My conversation with a japanese friend who read both editions revealed that the translation was a good as could be expected between two such different languages. Some dialog will seem odd, and some of the context will invariably be lost. That said, the stories are still captivating.
Finally, I noticed a strange thing about the book as a whole. The english version, naturally will read from left to right, as opposed to the japanese edition. The pages are in reverse order from the japanese version. However, I noticed that not only were the frames rearranged in reverse order to facilitate english-language readers, but each frame seemed to be reversed as well. For example, the character Nagi, who is a right-handed archer in the japanese version, becomes a left-handed archer in the english edition.
These are minor quibbles which in no way detract from the quality of the art within. I simply thought every one should know what's inside. Enjoy!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 12, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is outstanding. The characters are really life like in the minds eye. The main characters and minor characters burn themselves into your mind. The book has a lot of action in it to keep you in suspense!
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Format: Paperback
I liked this volume of Phoenix, but felt the three different stories are not given equal weight, and a long times would go by between checking back in with one of them. Even though I found the pages of text about Japanese history interesting, they broke up the story. You can tell Tezuka was still figuring out the series. Still good over all.
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