Customer Reviews


33 Reviews
5 star:
 (30)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

115 of 125 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gives highlights, but I didn't like depth of field treatment, November 10, 2009
By 
Tenna Merchent (Noblesville, IN USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
I thought this book was a good read. It covers a lot of issues in photography and gives highlights and good advice on many areas.

I was disappointed with their treatment of depth of field, which is what is in focus. They claim that the aperture (f-stop) determines the depth of field, and discuss this for several pages. It is not until page 196 where they mention that focal length affects depth of field. The focal length discussion needs to be in the depth of field discussion. With a wide angle lens you are going to have a long depth of field, and with a telephoto, you are going to have a shallow depth of field. Many authors make this mistake and send amateurs on wild goose chases because they don't have the proper lens to get the depth of field they seek.

Below are the notes I took for myself from this book. I hope you find them helpful.

Shutter speed can either freeze movement, or cause blurring. The faster the shutter speed, the more likely to freeze motion. On the high end:
* Toddler roaming 1/250
* Kids running 1/500
* Child swinging 1/1000
For noise free results use ISOs of 100-400. Common settings are:
* Sun 100
* Porch light 200
* Overcast day 200-400
* Window light 400
* Indoor w/o flash 800 and up
* Stage performance w/o flash 1600
* Indoor sports event w/o flash 1600
F stop (aperture) affects depth of field
* f/8 to f/22 produce a long depth of field, meaning most things are in focus, this is referred to as shooting closed down.
* For a short depth of field that makes the subject jump out and the background be more blurry use larger apertures. Most photos in this book were shot between f/1.4 and f/5.6. This is called shooting wide.
"Photographs are not made by cameras, which are only tools."
Program modes;
* Portrait mode is a precursor to aperture priority, sports mode to shutter priority,
* f/4 and f/5.6 give you pleasing depth of field for portraits. Larger f-stops, such as f/1.5 and f/1.2 make for very selective focus and make everything else blurry.

In the chapter on natural light, called "seeing the light", the authors favor natural light, and sweet light with is the first hour of sunlight of the day and the last hour. High-key photos are light subjects against a light background. Contouring light is 3 times as much light on one side of your subject as on the other side. Specular light is the bright line dividing the highlight from the shadow. The flash in the eyes is called catch lights.

There is also a chapter about manipulating light with flash, light modifiers, white balance, and studio lighting. Using your on camera flash as the main light is almost always a mistake. Cosmetic ads are shot with front or flat lighting because it creates a shadowless light that disguises imperfections. Rembrandt lighting is achieved by placing your subject at a 45-degree angle to your light source such as a window. With studio lights, the closer they are to the subject, the softer they appear.

On composition, keep it simple, and do so by getting close. Watch for dark things in light spaces and vice versa. Negative space is empty space around your subject that works to emphasize. Never crop off hands and feet. Either zoom in to the head and shoulders, or zoom out to get the hands, or zoom out more and get the whole body including feet.
Focal length
* 12mm Wide angle - good for large groups
* 50mm Standard - this is what the eye sees
* 105 Telephoto - often considered ideal for portraits (finally!)
* 200mm Telephoto - good for blurring out backgrounds and getting close to action
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


32 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Jewel of a Book, April 7, 2008
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
Put this wonderful book in your shopping cart and hit "buy now" as soon as you can. I wish that I had had this wonderful tool twenty years ago when I was starting my children's portrait business. Each chapter really guides you through the tools that you will need to succeed in taking impressive images of children. If you take it seriously, and do the assignments, you just might start seeing things in a different light, so to speak. Whether you just want to capture whimsical images of your own child as he passes through the phases of childhood, or if you truly intend to make photography more than a passion, but a business, then this book will take you to your desired level.Every page will delight you with amazing images of children. The various contributing photographers offer individual treatments to their subjects showing you a variety of what is plesaing. Read it, work it, absorb it and find your place in this fascinating field. I can't get enough of the timeless beach portraits found in Chapter 7.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


40 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My #1 Photography Book, May 8, 2008
Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
Having three daughters, documenting their childhood with photographs is a real priority for me. But I really lacked knowledge on how to take good photographs - I always relied on the auto settings on my camera and the pictures seemed so ordinary. In the attempt to learn more about photography, I purchased this book along with a couple of others. This book, by far, was the most helpful for me. I had been having a hard time wrapping my mind around the concepts of aperture and ISO, but this book really helped me understand! Each picture listed the shutter speed, aperture, and ISO, which helped me see what those things were doing to affect how the picture looked. Also, the pictures were so inspiring and gave me tons of ideas on composition. The assignments at the end of each chapter were helpful in developing my skills. The book was very pleasent to read and it's definitely a book for parents aspiring to become better photographers! My only wish was that the pictures also listed what type of lens was used (so that I could buy it and have the lenses that the professionals used!).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars best ever children photography how-to, February 22, 2008
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
Get this book if you have any interest at all in children's photography. The photos are wonderful and inspiring-- none of those cheesy, high-flash, heavy-filter shots so depressingly common in this genre. I am very proud to have a few of my photos included in this superbly-written and illustrated book. I've looked through others of its type and the advice is usually really obvious. Not so here. Even professional children photographers will learn from this book - I've been making my living at this for 10 years and still picked up a few things myself.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book!, March 2, 2008
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
This book was wonderful in helping me figure out what I was doing wrong, and how to do it right. I have been a closet photographer for most of my life, and had been disappointed by many of my efforts, basically, because I didn't know what I was doing wrong or how to change it. When I had my son, I started taking pictures of him at a break neck pace, and while I got a good shot every 20-30 pictures, I was looking to better return on me effort. This book was the key to that. The pictures in the book are really beautiful too. I highly recommend this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Capturing what is most important, March 25, 2008
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
Capturing our children, or as a photographer another person's child, is really one of the most important things one can do. In doing so we are providing a legacy and memory for ourselves and future generations. This book does an excellent job of guiding the novice and the professional in how to best capture children as they are. It provides technical information but more importantly provides you with ideas and assignments that will challenge you to use not only the camera but your heart and life experience to take great images of children. I couldn't find a book that was this easy to understand and this encouraging when I was starting out in the children's photography business and so I was very honored to provide images for this book when asked by the author. There are many years of experience and a great heart behind the words in this book so I would highly encourage anyone interested in photographing children to read it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Making the tough shots look easy, March 15, 2008
By 
V. Otis (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
I have a digital camera set to auto and I am an impatient, amateur photographer whose subjects are primarily wiggly, athletic grandchildren.
This book presents techniques that are easy to learn and teaches through simple steps and abundant beautiful photographs. I have become a pro overnight and this book made it happen.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great book if you already understand photography basics, otherwise might be confusing, December 3, 2010
Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
I am really glad I bought this book, but it might not work as well for some as it did for me. In summary:

If you have a good understanding of the technical aspects of photography but need some ideas about how to create good photos of children (this was my situation) then I think you will like this book a lot.

If F-stops and the like are a mystery to you then this may still be a good book for you, but I think you'll want to supplement it with a more solid primer on the basics of photography.

There are just a whole lot of cases of wrong/ambiguous/confusing terminology and incomplete explanations in this book that could really throw a beginner for a loop. For example:

* Confusing autofocus with auto exposure with regard to effecting a shallow depth of field

* Confusing the effect of camera shake with an image being out of focus

* Discussion of depth-of-field and F-stops, with no mention of the impact of crop factor or the fact that many cameras with small sensors and/or slow lenses can't achieve shallow depth of field (seems this would be worth mentioning in the chapter on choosing equipment -- Also no mention of image stabilization.)

* In discussion of software the author covers basic packages like iPhoto/Picasa and heavy-duty stuff like Photoshop but does not mention the middle ground of packages such as Lightroom and Aperture which are likely the best bet for most of her readers.

Really a good book overall, I don't mean to sound negative about it, but if I didn't already know what I was doing with the camera I might have spent some time scratching my head unnecessarily.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Guide, November 23, 2008
By 
Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
As a beginner photographer, I loved all the information in this book. The assignments were especially fun for me and my daughters. I loved the pictures and it gave me several ideas for creating beautiful family photographs. Since it's the only book in this Photo Workshop series that I've bought, I don't know if they all use this format, but it was very helpful for this new photographer!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspirational photos and helpful text, March 17, 2008
By 
This review is from: Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent (Paperback)
I read this book as it was being written because I worked with Ginny while I was at Wiley. I was lucky enough to have her use me as her test market for the book because I was a beginning photographer with an 8 year old daughter. I wanted to take memorable photos of my girl, not just posed, ordinary pictures. Ginny's photos inspired me and the way she described in her chapters how to take those unique photos really helped me see portraits and candid shots in a different way. With Ginny's instructions on using light on a face, I took a shot last summer that my family framed. It's lovely - I owe it all to Ginny!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0x93e204e0)

This product

Photographing Children Photo Workshop: Develop Your Digital Photography Talent
Used & New from: $7.40
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.