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Physical Chemistry, 9th Edition Hardcover – December 18, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-1429218122 ISBN-10: 1429218126 Edition: 9th

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1060 pages
  • Publisher: W. H. Freeman; 9th edition (December 18, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1429218126
  • ISBN-13: 978-1429218122
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.8 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (122 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #16,382 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

In summary this is another very impressive book. The Atkins' Physical chemistry book continues to improve with each successive thanks to the commitment of the authors to make t he book more accessible to its readers and more relevant to modern physical chemistry. The Higher Education Academy UK Physical Sciences Centre --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Peter Atkins is a fellow of Lincoln College in the University of Oxford and the author of more than sixty books for students and a general audience. His texts are market leaders around the globe. A frequent lecturer in the United States and throughout the world, he has held visiting professorships in France, Israel, Japan, China, and New Zealand. He was the founding chairman of the Committee on Chemistry Education of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and was a member of IUPAC's Physical and Biophysical Chemistry Division. Julio de Paula is Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Lewis and Clark College. A native of Brazil, Professor de Paula received a B.A. degree in chemistry from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and a Ph.D. in biophysical chemistry from Yale University. His research activities encompass the areas of molecular spectroscopy, biophysical chemistry, and nanoscience. He has taught courses in general chemistry, physical chemistry, biophysical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and writing. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

The textbook is excellent and any good professor can teach physical chemistry from it.
Nylorac711@aol.com
To make things more of a mess, the examples and mathematical derivations often gloss over several key points that make it difficult for students to follow.
Surly Student
I can understand the frustration over buying a book and having the binding/printing not very good.
J. A. Hansen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By bwelch on October 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
People either like Atkins' Physical Chemistry or loathe it. I like his book. The problems at the end of each section are excellent. I like how justifications for fundamental concepts are provided. One of the better modifications of the book was moving the relevant mathematical reviews to the end of the chapters where they apply. I believe this was in the 8th edition (I don't remember), but in the back there is also a section about where the relevant equations come from. The publisher also made sure to use better binding this time around. The binding is very tight compared to the 8th edition.

I still feel that too many of the theoretical problems are critical concepts and should not have to be proved by the student. I do understand having them prove some, but those should mostly be proved by the author or instructor. Proof at this level should be trivial results that are obvious extensions of fundamental concepts. Outside of that, Atkins is one of the better junior level physical chemistry books. If you need something more advanced, McQuarrie is a much better text for an advanced physical chemistry class.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Nate on January 29, 2007
Format: Hardcover
As with other editions of Atkins' P-Chem (I own 4th, 5th, & 7th), the topics are covered rigorously and at a level that I think is appropriate for a solid junior undergrad course in P-chem.

For a text that keeps up quite admirably with advancements in science, the diagrams and ancillaries (e.g., living graphs) continue to be weak and well behind the pedagogical innovations that make p-chem more accessible to students.

The quality of the binding is unacceptably poor. Like others on this page, I too have a copy of the text with the cover that has come apart. Freeman ought to republish the text with improved binding. This text should serve as a reference for students to use for many years to come. It absolutely cannot serve that function with the quality of the binding in this version.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Raul on January 8, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
So if you're getting this book, here are somethings you will want to know.

1) Before reading the chapter, look at the end of the chapter, before and after the problem section for "Further Information" and the Math lesson supplement. You need not understand it off the bat, but be familiar with what is there so that when you're going through the chapter, you can refer back to further information to make sense of the details.

2) Don't expect a perfect walk-through for the math. You need to sit there with the paper and figure out the skipped steps. There are a lot of skipped steps. Some easy algebra, other harder differentials.

3) When reading the units, you need to beware that you will see things like T/K. This doesn't mean Temperature/Kelvin or anything other that you want to make T to be, but rather saying it is temperature expressed in Kelvin. Seems like a silly way to do it, but once you get that it makes some problems easier.

4) If you get the answer manual, It is only for odds and A parts of problems. Evens and B's are in the Purple version of the answer key and that is pain in the butt to find. So I recommend looking up the previous edition to this one (i.e 8th edition solution manual) and using that one. The problems will be found under different sections/numbering but after a little searching you'll find it. The editions don't change much. No surprise there though.

5) Beware, there are questions awkwardly phrased. There is one in the first chapter regarding a tire. I solved it with my Gen Chem knowledge and it turned out to be wrong. As a class, we discussed it with our professor and found that in order to accurately answer the question, we need to define what is a tire- Meaning is it an isolated system, or not?
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By B. Terminello on November 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a standard physical chemistry book. There is a lot of calculus in the book, so sometimes it can be difficult to understand what is going on amid all the partial derivatives. However, it has all the odd numbered answers in the back. The solutions manual is absolutely the worst solutions manual I've ever encountered.
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29 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Nylorac711@aol.com on December 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I have read the other reviews and I believe that the students who rate this book poorly are mistaking their inability to grasp physical chemistry with a poor textbook. The textbook is excellent and any good professor can teach physical chemistry from it. It is well organized, starting with some basic thermodynamics background and moving to more complicated thermo. The next section is kinetics, which is also presented not nearly as well as the thermo, but Atkins does a good job nonetheless. Spectroscopy and statistical mechanics come next and although they are not simple to understand, Atkins is concise in his presentation. The remainder of the book is additional material which may or may not be covered in a physical chemistry course. What should also be noted are the appendices at the end. Atkins includes very helpful supplemental material in mathematics which is needed for the thermodynamics discussion. The tables are somewhat lacking, but any good reference book can supplement this information. Overall, I would say the book is well worth the money and I have yet to see another physical chemistry text which contains as much information as well presented as it is.
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