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Comment: 1955 Hardcover 1st illus. . 282 p. Former Library book. Light wear with minimal wear on cover and bindings. Pages show minor use.100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers.
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Pickles and Preserves Hardcover – January 1, 1955


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 282 pages
  • Publisher: Avenel Books Div of Crown Publishers; 1st edition (January 1, 1955)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00005XORV
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,750,639 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It is a pleasure to introduce a new generation of cooks and readers to Marion Brown's charming Pickles and Preserves, and to the remarkable woman who wrote it. With Mrs. Brown as guide, even novices, busy professionals, and occasional cooks can successfully master this rewarding home art. (Damon Lee Fowler, from the Foreword)" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

It is a pleasure to introduce a new generation of cooks and readers to Marion Brown's charming Pickles and Preserves, and to the remarkable woman who wrote it. . . . With Mrs. Brown as guide, even novices, busy professionals, and occasional cooks can successfully master this rewarding home art.--Damon Lee Fowler, from the Foreword --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Brooke Mcadam on September 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I think this is a terrific book, but as one can tell from the negative review, it is not for a new cook, or for someone who needs to have things spelled out to be comfortable. My mom (86) has had this book since the '50's and has had lots of fun trying things like conserve of roses, stringbean pickles,figs in wine jelly, guava paste,dewberry jelly, lots of wonderful tomato pickles and so on as well as more familiar things.

It is a book of recipes, for sure. Most of them handed down from Southern cooks. In fact, there are very informative and explicit general instructions about preserving and pickling in the front of the book. While I am not such an experienced "preserver' myself and have struggled with instructions such as "Cucumbers that have been brined by long fermentation" as an ingredient in "Sour Pickles" for example, I have also enjoyed finding her instructions on how to make them elsewhere in the book.I think it is a matter of structure, more than anything that we are not used to. Most jams, jellies and preserves follow basic principles with just a little tweaking depending on the ingredients or the result wanted. This book is organized like that. I have found the instructions work very well for me.

It is not the only preserving book in the world and is not really meant to be, but it is really marvelous in covering a wide range of possibilities. And it is a wonderful way of holding on to some traditions that are slipping through our grasp as well as our imaginations as things are made more simple and spelled out. As we have come to trust ourselves less and are more interested in product over process.

I think what is important is to think about what kind of a cook you are, or want to be.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kathleen Valentine on June 25, 2010
Format: Paperback
I'm so happy this book has been re-issued! I have my mother's copy of the original 1955 edition and it was her Bible in the Fall when the garden started yielding more produce than we could consume (and there were 10 of us!) What makes this cookbook particularly enjoyable is the variety of strange and fascinating recipes. Some are quick and easy to be made in small batches. A few are labeled "Career Girl" recipes and are made from frozen fruits and vegetables so busy "career girls" (a popular term in the 50s) could hurry home from their "girl Friday" jobs and whip up a batch of salad pickles that tasted like she had slaved in the kitchen for hours.

I love some of the very old-fashioned sounding chapters. Crystallized Fruits & Flowers has detailed instructions for crystallizing everything from strawberries to violets and tons of recipes including Honey & Rose-Petal Preserves and Glacéd Wine Figs. There is a chapter on Conserves, which I happen to be partial to, including Rhubarb (Pie Plant) Conserve and Red Beet Conserve. The rather lengthy Meats and Sea Food chapter includes all Venison Mincemeat, Pickled Oysters, instructions for brining, corning, and pickling meat, a variety of meat pastes, sausages and scrapples and "Easy Brined Shrimp".

Marion Brown's section on Preserves is testimony to the fact that early cooks could figure out a way to preserve darn near anything and includes quaint recipes like Sun-Cooked Strawberry Preserves, Pumpkin Chips, and Cantalope Preserves.

Perhaps the most unique recipe in the book is one she copied from a fifteenth century cookbook for "Peris in Syrippe and Wyne", She adds 2 interpretations of that, her own and a variation by a friend which adds orange slices. I love the idea of adding saffron.
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Format: Paperback
This book is from the 50s and as such contains outdated processing methods including alcohol soaked paper and paraffin. However, don't let that deter you. You can still make all of these great recipes using modern processing techniques. If you are a beginner, you will want to read up on water bath processing and apply your knowledge to the pickles and fruit based preserves.
The recipes themselves are very unique and I really enjoyed that aspect. There are not-often seen pickle recipes as well as many variations which is really nice. I actually got this book from the library first and decided I wanted to own it because it was so cool.
I also noticed in one of the other reviews the mention of using the pre-fermented pickles for a recipe. If you read the book in order first, it's easy to see the progression of the recipes. Fermented pickles are covered pretty extensively and they are used as the basis for later recipes. Given that so many people are really into fermenting and culturing now (myself included) I really enjoyed seeing these traditional recipes.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Canon Fan on August 24, 2008
Format: Paperback
I'm glad this is the first review of this book. It probably means that not too many have been sold. That's a good thing!
I guess this is intended to be more of a history book of canning rather than a practical guide. The receipes are interesting, but then you get these useless instructions to pack in sterilized jars and seal.
There are no instructions for sealing! Should it be 15 minutes in a boiling water bath? or 10 minutes in a pressure canner at 10 lbs or 15 lbs? Oh, maybe we should use paraffin or rubber rings.
Basically, this is a charming book about preserving, but is not intended for practical use.
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