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Comment: Llewellyn Publications; 2008; Cards; used tarot deck set in box. light wear to corners/edges of box, covers remain clean. all cards and booklet are present. cards remain clean.
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Pictorial Key Tarot Cards – March 5, 2012


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Product Details

  • Cards
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Publications (March 5, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0738712892
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738712895
  • Product Dimensions: 4.9 x 5.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #250,050 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Davide Corsi is an illustrator based in Italy.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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The cards are printed on very thin paper.
stargazer
After hearing so many bad stuff about The Gilded Tarot cards, This Pictorial Key Tarot have got to be one of the best tarot cads LS have ever relased and done.
Jose Rivera
The artwork on these cards is great...which makes your readings feel tangible and immediate--like looking through a window vs. looking at a book.
Lori Lynn LaPage

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Janet Boyer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 20, 2008
Format: Cards
"The deck designed by Davide Corsi, under the supervision of Lo Scarabeo editorial team is the most recent and highly evolved representation of the Pictorial Key. Even though it is ostensibly simple and essential, the images, realized with modern painting techniques, are brimming with real and relevant symbolism, ideas, and intuitions that can be applied to various existential levels: ethical, meditative, divinatory and metaphysical." - From the L(ittle) W(hite) B(ook) to the Pictorial Key Tarot

From the Italian artist who illustrated the Tarot of the Elves emerges a vibrant CGI deck firmly planted in Rider-Waite-Smith imagery--the Pictorial Key Tarot. Gleaming metal and pockmarked stone, smooth marble and rough-hewn wood interplay with luxurious fabrics, star-studded skies, rippling waters and billowy clouds, but at the center remains the familiar RWS cast of characters and symbols.

At first blush, the Pictorial Key Tarot resembles another black-bordered CGI deck: the Gilded Tarot. However, there are several differences between the two decks. In the Pictorial Key Tarot, no card names or suits grace the borders, only Roman numerals for the Major Arcana, numbers and suit symbols for the Minor Arcana, and emblems for the Court cards (i.e. a helmet for Knaves, horse head for Knights, and crowns for the Kings and Queens).

The Pictorial Key Tarot takes less interpretive risks than the Gilded Tarot with its conformity to RWS imagery, and thus lacks the unnecessary frills, filigrees and random planetary placement of the Gilded Tarot.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By musicfan28if on July 3, 2009
Format: Cards
The PK Tarot is ideally suited for tarotists who are looking for another RWS clone though the nudity on cards such as the Lovers and the Star is sufficiently graphic to turn off some people. Many of the figures look cast in stone. Since it is based on Arthur Waite's Pictorial Key to the Tarot, most of the cards adhere quite closely to familiar RWS imagery.

Typical of a Lo Scarabeo deck, however, there are a few befuddling oddities. Death looks like a Hierophant from hell with two attendants bowing in worship or fear. The Moon has a nasty octopus in place of the crawfish, somewhat limiting itself to danger-related meanings. The 4 of Swords figure is cradling his head on the tomb, apparently in sorrow, rather than resting in peace. Though not completely matching Waite's Pictorial Key, it's still a good deck to have and work with, especially for those wishing to tap into Octopus Power.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By stargazer on September 23, 2011
Format: Cards Verified Purchase
I've just received my tarot deck. I must say that I was looking forward to this deck with great anticipation. Viewed on the computer screen, these images are fresh, colorful, and lush. However, once I had unwrapped the deck and held the cards in my hand I noticed a few things.

1. The cards are printed on very thin paper. This deck is not a professional grade deck, and will not be able to be used for client readings. It just won't last, sadly.

2. While the images themselves are quite lush and colorful, the figures on the images seem somewhat more static than they did on screen. In other words, there is not a lot of motion in this art. The pictures seem flat, the figures static. If you are looking at the card, you can tell that it is very obviously photography washed thru photoshop. There are a few parts of images that may be either primitive drawings or highly processed photos, but the energy and life of a drawn or painted image is not to be seen here.

3. There are important elements of symbolism left out of the pictures. It is not that the cards need to look like the Rider Waite deck. They certainly don't. But if you are going to make a Tarot deck, rather than another kind of oracle deck, you need to understand the symbolism of what you are doing. For example, the very first card of the Major Arcana, the Fool, is missing the dog. In addition, both the Fools feet are on the ground. Without going into too much, I'll just say that this misses the point of the card entirely. The dog doesn't need to be small and terrier-like, or even wolf-like as in the Cicero's Golden Dawn Magical deck, but to take that symbol out without replacing it with one of similar meaning, changes the overall intention of the card.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Louis on January 9, 2011
Format: Cards
I have been enjoying this deck, which is in the Rider Waite tradition. The colors are vibrant and the art is generally pleasing. The artist seems to have simplified the RW symbolism, often leaving out what I have been accustomed to as important parts of the scene. For example, there is no dog in the Fool card. The Hermit looks like a marble statue rather than a person. The faces on some of the figures look too computer-graphic. The Magician seems to have an angry face. The man in the 10 of Wands appears totally unburdened by his load. Many of the women look like Barbie dolls, a look that I don't care for. Trump III should look like a regal earth mother rather than Empress Barbie. The Page of Swords looks like a robotic warrior, perhaps inspired by Robo-Cop. As I read this over, I realize it sounds a bit negative. Nonetheless, this is quite an attractive deck and I think it is worth owning and experimenting with. I did a one-card reading with the deck with the question, "What advice should I give the potential buyer?" and the response was Trump I, the Magus or Magician, which I take to mean that you should use the tools provided by the deck to discover its usefulness.
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