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Pilgrim Theology: Core Doctrines for Christian Disciples Hardcover – February 2, 2013


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan (February 2, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310330645
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310330646
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #233,607 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Michael Horton is the author of over 20 books and host of the White Horse Inn, a nationally syndicated radio programHe is the professor of Systematic Theology and Apologetics at Westminster Seminary California and the editor-in-chief of Modern Reformation magazine.  A popular blogger and sought-after lecturer, he resides in Escondido, California with his wife and children.

 

Customer Reviews

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I recommend this book for any one who is reformed, or who is wondering what reformed theology is.
Joshua Ross
This is an abridged version of Horton's magnus opus book on Systematic Theology, "The Christian Faith."
Dr Conrade Yap
I received this book free of charge from Zondervan and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
Roger Leonhardt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Schwisow on February 8, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Michael Horton's new "Pilgrim Theology" is an abridged version of his larger Systematic Theology, "The Christian Faith". Horton's larger work has already received much acclaim for its up to date modern treatment of Christian theology in the Reformed tradition. Horton comes from a Dutch Reformed background and his theology is consistent with such a viewpoint.

"Pilgrim Theology" is a clear presentation of much of the same material contained in the larger work but instead directed at laypersons and those looking for a smaller work to refer to or to use in group studies. Horton does well with clear explanations of key Christian doctrines and the terminology associated with them. The book includes helpful excurses on various terms providing the reader with helpful definitions. The book also contains a glossary containing clear definitions for the reader.

Horton's work covers all the major topics covered in most Systematic Theologies including doctrine of Scripture, God, creation, man, Christ, salvation, the church, and the last things. The work is concise (about 450 pages) but still fairly comprehensive. It is not as overwhelming as Horton's larger work.

Horton's theology is consistent with the Reformed confessions in most situations. He is well known for his emphasis on law-gospel and two kingdoms theology. These positions do have some pedigree in Reformed history but have not always been agreed upon. Horton states his position on these matters fairly and clearly. An admirable feature of this text is the integration of biblical theology, something lacking in some earlier Reformed works. He also desires to integrate doxology and worship with the study of theology. This is also an admirable feature.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mathew Sims on February 25, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Pilgrim Theology is a condensed and modified (by about half) edition of Horton's much larger systematic The Christian Faith. He lays the cards on the table in the opening paragraph,
Whether you realize it or not, you are a theologian. You come to a book like this with a working theology, an existing understanding of God. Whether you are an agnostic or a fundamentalist--or something in between--you have a working theology that shapes and informs the way you think and live. However, I suspect that you are reading this book because you're interested in examining your theology more closely. (p. 13)
and a little later, "The burden of this book is to elaborate the claim that God has revealed answers, through we will not like all of them" (p. 15).

With a book this larger (just north of 500 pages), I debated on how to approach this review. I don't want to detail the topics covered. For the most part Horton covers what you'd expect in a systematic. There may have been a few things he did or didn't touch on where I scratched my head, but for the most part it's what you'd expect. What I landed on was this: I will highlight a few of the strengths of this book and then end with a section detailing the drawbacks and my recommendation.

Strengths. First, I love that Horton placed this book squarely within the framework of the gospel narrative without ending there. He explains,
All of our faith and practice arise out of the drama of Scripture, the "big story" that traces the plot of history from creation to consummation, with Christ as its Alpha and Omega, beginning and end. And out of the throbbing verbs of this unfolding drama God reveals stable nouns--doctrines.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Dr Conrade Yap on March 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Who needs another theology textbook? We all do. We need to be reminded over and over again that we are pilgrims on a journey, needing food and guidance to complete it. We need to learn the core doctrines over and over again in a world of many conflicting philosophies and worldviews. We need resources to help teach and guide younger believers among us. Enter's "Pilgrim Theology" that aims to bridge reality and theology as one.

This is an abridged version of Horton's magnus opus book on Systematic Theology, "The Christian Faith." While the original is more than 1000 pages long, this book of "core doctrines for Christian disciples" is about half the size. Like the bigger predecessor, Horton explains the reason for the title of his book, that it is meant for Christian disciples on a journey of spiritual growth, underpinned by a common theological statement of faith. It is the author's convictions that theology needs to be learned humbly, obediently, and practically. It is reality that forces the disciple to want to learn theology. It is our need for God that we have to develop an understanding of core doctrines as followers of Christ. Knowing the story of God helps guide our own spiritual direction. Just like the directions that a compass provides, Horton uses "four coordinates" to help guide one's theological expedition. The first one is "drama" that begins with God, the history of the world, and the eventual glory of God. As this drama unfolds, the second coordinate, the "doctrines" help disciples navigate life from God's perspective. The third coordinate, "doxology" presents to disciples the way of life, the manner in which we ought to conduct ourselves in our relationships to God, to people, and to all of creation.
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