Transparent 1 Season 2014

An Amazon Original Series

Season 1
Available on Prime
(3,093)
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

1. Pilot TV-MA CC

A new Amazon Original Series: Created by Jill Soloway (Six Feet Under, United States of Tara). An LA family with serious boundary issues have their past and future unravel when a dramatic admission causes everyone's secrets to spill out. More episodes coming soon exclusively on Prime Instant Video.

Starring:
Jeffrey Tambor, Gaby Hoffmann
Runtime:
31 minutes
Original air date:
February 7, 2014

Available in HD on supported devices.

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Watch season 1 of Amazon Originals Alpha House and Betas.

Pilot [HD]

Product Details

Genres Comedy
Director Jill Soloway
Starring Jeffrey Tambor, Gaby Hoffmann
Supporting actors Jeffrey Tambor, Amy Landecker, Rob Huebel, Judith Light, Henry Simmons, Jay Duplass, Lawrence Pressman, Sawyer Ever, Alison Sudol, Abby Ryder Fortson, Brett Paesel, Juana Samayoa, Zackary Drucker, Clementine Greevy, Melissa Stephens
Season year 2014
Network Amazon Studios
Executive Producer Jill Soloway
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1,841
4 star
468
3 star
218
2 star
207
1 star
359
See all 3,093 customer reviews
Great cast, writing and acting!
scott glover
Quirky show about a dysfunctional family that is very funny at times to "watch" the family members interact with each other.
Barbara W.
The story is so well-written and the characters seem very real.
theunintentionalvegan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Watches with Wolves on February 8, 2014
This one could be an acquired taste of all the Amazon pilots but one worth nurturing.

A story about a shambolic, dysfunctional but loving Jewish family in Los Angeles, the direction by writer Jill Solloway captures the lived-in feel of a family whose members are used to each other's company, with interruptions, overlapping dialogue and utterly convincing nuances.

The characters are invariably self-obsessed, smart, deeply flawed but achingly human, and we're invited to be part of their world from the beginning. This has the feel of one of the edgier entries you might find at the Sundance Film Festival or HBO, but without the sense of anger or bitterness often found in HBO comedies. That's not to say the story won't have its fair share of chaos and dark comedy or pathos.

One of the pilots that justify its own existence. Well worth watching and continuing.
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162 of 195 people found the following review helpful By Robert Desiderio on February 6, 2014
This show has heart, humor, edge and amazing work done by everyone. A leap into uncharted series waters that not only takes us into a unique experience, but also charts a path that entertains, engages, engrosses and enlightens. Check it out.
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115 of 139 people found the following review helpful By Charles Ridgely on February 6, 2014
In today's broadcasting world HBO kind of holds a monopoly and honest television. With the likes of Girls and new series Looking, the network is the only one who isn't afraid to take a look at the brutal honesty that lives within us. Amazon is finally stepping up and giving Girls a run for their money. This show needs to get a season order so more networks and streaming services will start breaking into the new age of modern, honest programming.
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34 of 39 people found the following review helpful By brenm on February 17, 2014
Amazing and perfect that a show can revolve, in some ways, around the corny, heartbreaking '70s song "Operator" by Jim Croce - a song about a guy on a pay phone, talking to an operator as he tries to get the number for his old girlfriend, who left him for his "best old ex friend Ray" so he can call and tell them both that he's fine, he's moved on, he's over it, which he isn't. But this is a show all about triangles, and even though there's no such thing as a pay phone any more - much less one where you can make a call for a dime - "Operator" is the perfect metaphor for the disconnection this whole family feels. Father Jeffrey Tambor can't believe he has raised three people "who can't see past themselves." Son and music producer Jay Duplass is mentoring a trio of young musicians - and sleeping with one of them - at the same time that he's having a weird, wordless affair with a woman who materializes out of nowhere in the middle of the episode. Daughter Amy Landecker is sleepwalking through her marriage until an old girlfriend drops in, a still smoldering human relic from the college days when she was "lezzing it up" so passionately. And then there's the second daughter, Gaby Hoffman, angry, depressed, unemployed, full of bad ideas for books no one wants to read. She wants someone to make her do something; if it hurts, so much the better. It doesn't necessarily sound like compelling entertainment.

But "Transparent" is full of secrets and surprises, the biggest one being the powerful grip it exerts over its audience: four people, none of them particularly likable, all self-absorbed, all aching for something new and different that will turn their lives around. It ought to be pale and depressing. But that's not the way it feels.
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91 of 116 people found the following review helpful By James D. on February 6, 2014
Strongly reminiscent of "Arrested Development", Transparent relives many of the themes endemic to that much-acclaimed comedy. In core content, the show is nothing new--its the running story of a dysfunctional family that traces their attempts, both alone and together, to wade through life and the curveballs it throws.

But whereas Arrested Development is light and deeply formulaic, Transparent takes a darker and more dramatic approach. Indeed, the show is as much a drama as a comedy. The comedy is less self-consciously aware of itself, unlike "Arrested" which clubs you over the head with it. It does have its light bits though, and, as a result of the darker context, you can appreciate them all the more. The dramatic aspects mesh well with the comedic, and should spark many emotions in any empathetic viewer. This ability to evoke emotions of all kinds represents, to me at least, the hallmark of true art. It's great to experience it.

Reprising his role as patriarch--though that term may prove rather inaccurate--Jeffrey Tambor delivers an excellent performance in the pilot. The rest of the family also does well in their respective rolls. This strength in casting makes the story feel deeply genuine.

Amazon should continue production of Transparent.

Recommendations: I'd like to see a bigger roll for Rob Heubel, who plays Amy Landecker's husband. I LOVED him in his sketches on MTV's Human Giant, and I think he has enormous potential. Overall, I think many viewers would appreciate a stronger shift towards the comedic, and away from the dramatic. The drama is great and certainly plays an important part, but humor really should play a stronger role.
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54 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Chad Echo on February 6, 2014
First of all the cast is fantastic. As an LA transplant from NY and someone who is very well versed in the Jewish culture (although not a Jew), I found this show to be a real interesting slice of life. Tambor is great always as is Gaby Hoffman. The pilot was very grounded and felt authentic in what it was trying to portray. In many ways, it was an independent film brought to series and if this is the kind of material Amazon is going to be producing/distributing, then you'll have a subscriber and fan.

Kudos to Jill Soloway. Hope for more.
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