Transparent 1 Season 2014

An Amazon Original Series

Season 1
Available on Prime
(15,321) IMDb 7.7/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

1. Pilot TV-MA CC

An LA family with serious boundary issues have their past and future unravel when a dramatic admission causes everyone's secrets to spill out. Starring Jeffrey Tambor, Judith Light, Amy Landecker, Jay Duplass, and Gaby Hoffmann.

Starring:
Jeffrey Tambor, Gaby Hoffmann
Runtime:
31 minutes
Original air date:
September 26, 2014

Available to watch on supported devices.

Transparent Wins “Best TV Series, Musical or Comedy” at the Golden Globes

The show Entertainment Weekly rated #1 in 2014, Transparent, won “Best TV Series Musical or Comedy” and “Best Actor in a TV Series, Musical or Comedy” at the 2015 Golden Globe Awards

Pilot [HD]

Season 1

Customer Reviews

Great acting, writing, and cast.
amazonian
Entertaining, thought provoking , great acting and character development...touches on many family and other real life issues!
Johanne Ryker
Funny, poignant, great character development overall and a very timely show, too.
Deirdre G.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

572 of 642 people found the following review helpful By brenm on February 17, 2014
Amazing and perfect that a show can revolve, in some ways, around the corny, heartbreaking '70s song "Operator" by Jim Croce - a song about a guy on a pay phone, talking to an operator as he tries to get the number for his old girlfriend, who left him for his "best old ex friend Ray" so he can call and tell them both that he's fine, he's moved on, he's over it, which he isn't. But this is a show all about triangles, and even though there's no such thing as a pay phone any more - much less one where you can make a call for a dime - "Operator" is the perfect metaphor for the disconnection this whole family feels. Father Jeffrey Tambor can't believe he has raised three people "who can't see past themselves." Son and music producer Jay Duplass is mentoring a trio of young musicians - and sleeping with one of them - at the same time that he's having a weird, wordless affair with a woman who materializes out of nowhere in the middle of the episode. Daughter Amy Landecker is sleepwalking through her marriage until an old girlfriend drops in, a still smoldering human relic from the college days when she was "lezzing it up" so passionately. And then there's the second daughter, Gaby Hoffman, angry, depressed, unemployed, full of bad ideas for books no one wants to read. She wants someone to make her do something; if it hurts, so much the better. It doesn't necessarily sound like compelling entertainment.

But "Transparent" is full of secrets and surprises, the biggest one being the powerful grip it exerts over its audience: four people, none of them particularly likable, all self-absorbed, all aching for something new and different that will turn their lives around. It ought to be pale and depressing. But that's not the way it feels.
19 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
202 of 249 people found the following review helpful By Watches with Wolves on February 8, 2014
This one could be an acquired taste of all the Amazon pilots but one worth nurturing.

A story about a shambolic, dysfunctional but loving Jewish family in Los Angeles, the direction by writer Jill Solloway captures the lived-in feel of a family whose members are used to each other's company, with interruptions, overlapping dialogue and utterly convincing nuances.

The characters are invariably self-obsessed, smart, deeply flawed but achingly human, and we're invited to be part of their world from the beginning. This has the feel of one of the edgier entries you might find at the Sundance Film Festival or HBO, but without the sense of anger or bitterness often found in HBO comedies. That's not to say the story won't have its fair share of chaos and dark comedy or pathos.

One of the pilots that justify its own existence. Well worth watching and continuing.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
167 of 207 people found the following review helpful By A Real Mensch on September 28, 2014
I haven't seen a comedy quite this good in quite a while. The writing is very truthful and obviously crafted with such love. Jeffrey Tambor gives his most complex performance to date, and that is saying something. Judith Light offers strong support as the main character's ex-wife, and Amy Landecker, Jay Duplass, and Gaby Hoffman turn in strong performances as his children. Obviously, the show focuses on a character transitioning into his life as a transgender woman, but each of the central characters is in a trans- state as well. All are going through or across something, This is not a knee-slapper - it's an intellectual comedy - but I nonetheless found myself laughing often and loudly. I will be watching again, and I look forward to Season 2.
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
253 of 326 people found the following review helpful By Robert Desiderio on February 6, 2014
This show has heart, humor, edge and amazing work done by everyone. A leap into uncharted series waters that not only takes us into a unique experience, but also charts a path that entertains, engages, engrosses and enlightens. Check it out.
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By brendon etter on February 17, 2014
Hard to see how secrets come to light, as mentioned in the plot summary, in a family where they spend the whole first episode talking so brazenly, openly and frankly with each other.

So all four of them have "unconventional" hidden sexuality which they cover with aggressive bantering and a surface sheen of truthfulness? Is that the idea? I'm having a very hard time reconciling this unabashed openness with the idea that they have any secrets at all. Seems that they would have no problem discerning and discussing each others' hidden realities given their willingness to approach any subject with each other. (Commenting on his sister's vagina, call a sister's husband her "sugar daddy" in a genuinely dismissive tone and referring to her posh lifestyle, talking about the teenagers he's sleeping with...)

Families with genuine shame will be defensive and hide behind combative dialogue, sure, but if we want to believe they have meaningful shame about their secrets - shame enough to create dramatic tension - then they probably wouldn't be that open about so many other issues which also would be sources of shame in this type of dysfunctional family unit.

The tension isn't there. The dramatic stakes are not there. (Obviously, that may take a few episodes to develop.)

The dialogue and character traits undercut the plot's fundamental conceit.

On a final note, why is it labelled a comedy? If it's to be a dark comedy, even dark comedies have genuine laughs in them. While there are some clever lines, clever does not equal comedy. It's flat in that respect.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews