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298 of 324 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Starts slowly but builds up to a brilliant second half with enormous potential
I have dual suggestions for anyone thinking of trying FRINGE. First, definitely watch it. Second, be very, very patient. The show eventually gets very, very good, but it takes a very long time to get there. I have a theory as to why that is. FOX has a tendency to micro manage many of its shows. DOLLHOUSE is an example. After Joss Whedon brought them his initial...
Published on May 12, 2009 by Robert Moore

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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Basically a good idea, but flawed in execution...
Well, I must confess that I am a bit surprised about the high number of raving reviews for "Fringe". I did get the set and went through it in a week. I must say that some episodes were truly brilliant, however some were so out there that the viewer must put aside all gray matter to be able to enjoy the show. If you like conspiracy theories and suspect that the governments...
Published on October 6, 2009 by T. Kucukyumuk


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298 of 324 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Starts slowly but builds up to a brilliant second half with enormous potential, May 12, 2009
I have dual suggestions for anyone thinking of trying FRINGE. First, definitely watch it. Second, be very, very patient. The show eventually gets very, very good, but it takes a very long time to get there. I have a theory as to why that is. FOX has a tendency to micro manage many of its shows. DOLLHOUSE is an example. After Joss Whedon brought them his initial pilot, they nixed it and asked for a new one, and then dictated that the first several episodes be standalone episodes. And guess what. In the sixth episode DOLLHOUSE became one of the best shows on TV, with multiple delicious plot twists. The weakest part of the series? The first five stand alone episodes. I have not heard similar things about FRINGE, but given that the first half of the season tends to be almost all stand alone episodes and that they are far and away the weakest part of the show, I suspect more FOX interference. FRINGE has been compared to THE X-FILES in many ways, but one way that they are dissimilar is that THE X-FILES standalone episodes were far superior to FRINGE's standalone episodes. So the viewer has to be patient for the payoff for watching the show to come to fruition. But the payoff does finally come. About halfway through the series a "mythology" arc emerges in a most satisfying way, resulting in a string of deeply satisfying and exciting episodes in the second half of the season. At the end of the first year, it hasn't yet quite become a great show, but it shows all the potential of becoming one. But perhaps only if FOX will get out of the way and let them get on with the story.

The show also suffered from internal problems, the main one being casting. I came to like Anna Torv in the lead role of Agent Olivia Dunham, but she remained in many ways the show's weak link. Many fans noted that her American accent (Torv is Australian) often faded and especially early in the show her Aussie accent would briefly creep in. She isn't a bad actress, but neither is she - comparing the show once again to THE X-FILES - Gillian Anderson, who was by any accounting a brilliant actress. When I watch FRINGE, I often wonder just what the show would be like with a stronger actress in the lead role. I also have not yet become sold on Joshua Jackson as Peter Bishop, but this may be far more of a problem with the writers fully integrating him into the show. (Though the season ends with a great, great twist involving Peter that explains a lot of the background on Walter's story.) Other than being Walter's son, his role in the greater scheme of things hasn't really become clear, though perhaps the writers envision a more crucial role in Season Two. Lance Reddick is a powerful physical presence, but is another actor who has perhaps been under utilized at this point.

Which leaves John Noble as Walter Bishop. Is there a more delightful supporting character on TV? He steals just about every scene he is in as the delightfully idiosyncratic and marvelously insane genius Walter Bishop. Walter is both a wonderfully written character and brilliantly portrayed by Noble. Sci-fi series do not as a rule get much recognition by the Emmys, but I would love to see Noble get a nomination for Best Supporting Actor in a Drama. Many of the great moments of the show's first season revolve around Walter. And there are so many fine Walter moments that some go unnoticed. Among my favorites was in the show's penultimate episode where the crew is assembled in Walter's Harvard lab and someone says they need to turn the lights out. Walter gleefully tells them all to hold on and he claps his hands, demonstrating that he has "the Clapper" installed in the lab. But what makes the scene so funny is a very subtle bit of business. Walter has been passing out cookies and has one of his own. To be able to clap, he has set his own cookie down on the derrière of the corpse he has been examining and that is laying immediately in front of him. So while Walter is clapping his cookie is on this dead guy's rear end. Typical Walter. Not least because of Walter's penchant for blending the investigation of the most grotesque phenomena with food. Icky disfigured corpse? Nothing like that to get Walter to think about food!

The best thing about FRINGE is that it got better as it went along. This is a great sign for Season Two. I blame FOX for the slow first half of the season. Maybe I'm wrong in doing that, but we know for a fact that FOX messed up the first half of DOLLHOUSE, and they've been known to interfere with the development of other shows. The fact is this: executive producers and their writers know more about how to do a great show than network executives do. Maybe they feel that they need to earn their salaries by "crafting" the new series, but generally what they do is mess things up. You hire someone like J. J. Abrams or Joss Whedon to do a series, just get out of the way and let them do what they inevitably do better than you do.

So definitely watch this show. Be patient. It starts off OK, but about halfway through the season it will really start to kick tail. I think there is some core weakness in the cast, but not to the degree that it cripples the show. Best of all, this show really feels like it is going somewhere special. Make sure you are along for the ride.
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106 of 119 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most intelligent series in recent years, May 11, 2009
This review is from: Fringe: Season 1 (DVD)
Brainchild of JJ Abrams, this show is loaded with all the vitamins a good series needs: an exciting and innovative plot, along with well-scripted characters. Some episodes are a bit of a fill-out but the overall plot, much like the show Lost, is very interesting and has one at the edge of their seat. Anna Torv is a bit of a newcomer without much experience, but portrays her character very well. John Noble does a cracking job as the somewhat looney Einstein-inspired Dr Walter Bishop. The biggest surprise is Joshua Jackson who's getting a bit of a fresh start in his career with this show. He does an excellent job as the intelligent Peter Bishop, son of Walter Bishop. Another brilliant choice actor-wise is Lance Reddick, known from The Wire (which by the way probably is the best show in TV history).
The main plot? Well, strange incidents are occuring, perpetrated by a mysterious terrorist group using the world as their experiment lab. The events are investigated by the characters named above. As the story unfolds, the motives of this terrorist group start to emerge and the question rises: Who is the real enemy?
Scripted and created by the same guys who wrote the new Star Trek film, this show is the new Lost. It has been picked up for a season 2, and will probably go beyond that. Brilliant stuff.
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150 of 174 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Starts slowly but builds up to a brilliant second half with enormous potential, May 12, 2009
This review is from: Fringe: Season 1 (DVD)
I have dual suggestions for anyone thinking of trying FRINGE. First, definitely watch it. Second, be very, very patient. The show eventually gets very, very good, but it takes a very long time to get there. I have a theory as to why that is. FOX has a tendency to micro manage many of its shows. DOLLHOUSE is an example. After Joss Whedon brought them his initial pilot, they nixed it and asked for a new one, and then dictated that the first several episodes be standalone episodes. And guess what. In the sixth episode DOLLHOUSE became one of the best shows on TV, with multiple delicious plot twists. The weakest part of the series? The first five stand alone episodes. I have not heard similar things about FRINGE, but given that the first half of the season tends to be almost all stand alone episodes and that they are far and away the weakest part of the show, I suspect more FOX interference. FRINGE has been compared to THE X-FILES in many ways, but one way that they are dissimilar is that THE X-FILES standalone episodes were far superior to FRINGE's standalone episodes. So the viewer has to be patient for the payoff for watching the show to come to fruition. But the payoff does finally come. About halfway through the series a "mythology" arc emerges in a most satisfying way, resulting in a string of deeply satisfying and exciting episodes in the second half of the season. At the end of the first year, it hasn't yet quite become a great show, but it shows all the potential of becoming one. But perhaps only if FOX will get out of the way and let them get on with the story.

The show also suffered from internal problems, the main one being casting. I came to like Anna Torv in the lead role of Agent Olivia Dunham, but she remained in many ways the show's weak link. Many fans noted that her American accent (Torv is Australian) often faded and especially early in the show her Aussie accent would briefly creep in. She isn't a bad actress, but neither is she - comparing the show once again to THE X-FILES - Gillian Anderson, who was by any accounting a brilliant actress. When I watch FRINGE, I often wonder just what the show would be like with a stronger actress in the lead role. I also have not yet become sold on Joshua Jackson as Peter Bishop, but this may be far more of a problem with the writers fully integrating him into the show. (Though the season ends with a great, great twist involving Peter that explains a lot of the background on Walter's story.) Other than being Walter's son, his role in the greater scheme of things hasn't really become clear, though perhaps the writers envision a more crucial role in Season Two. Lance Reddick is a powerful physical presence, but is another actor who has perhaps been under utilized at this point.

Which leaves John Noble as Walter Bishop. Is there a more delightful supporting character on TV? He steals just about every scene he is in as the delightfully idiosyncratic and marvelously insane genius Walter Bishop. Walter is both a wonderfully written character and brilliantly portrayed by Noble. Sci-fi series do not as a rule get much recognition by the Emmys, but I would love to see Noble get a nomination for Best Supporting Actor in a Drama. Many of the great moments of the show's first season revolve around Walter. And there are so many fine Walter moments that some go unnoticed. Among my favorites was in the show's penultimate episode where the crew is assembled in Walter's Harvard lab and someone says they need to turn the lights out. Walter gleefully tells them all to hold on and he claps his hands, demonstrating that he has "the Clapper" installed in the lab. But what makes the scene so funny is a very subtle bit of business. Walter has been passing out cookies and has one of his own. To be able to clap, he has set his own cookie down on the derrière of the corpse he has been examining and that is laying immediately in front of him. So while Walter is clapping his cookie is on this dead guy's rear end. Typical Walter. Not least because of Walter's penchant for blending the investigation of the most grotesque phenomena with food. Icky disfigured corpse? Nothing like that to get Walter to think about food!

The best thing about FRINGE is that it got better as it went along. This is a great sign for Season Two. I blame FOX for the slow first half of the season. Maybe I'm wrong in doing that, but we know for a fact that FOX messed up the first half of DOLLHOUSE, and they've been known to interfere with the development of other shows. The fact is this: executive producers and their writers know more about how to do a great show than network executives do. Maybe they feel that they need to earn their salaries by "crafting" the new series, but generally what they do is mess things up. You hire someone like J. J. Abrams or Joss Whedon to do a series, just get out of the way and let them do what they inevitably do better than you do.

So definitely watch this show. Be patient. It starts off OK, but about halfway through the season it will really start to kick tail. I think there is some core weakness in the cast, but not to the degree that it cripples the show. Best of all, this show really feels like it is going somewhere special. Make sure you are along for the ride.
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42 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worthy of the Hype!, September 11, 2008
In 2001, when a little show called Alias hit the airwaves, I was instantly hooked on the creative genius that is J.J. Abrams. Since Alias, Abrams has become a household name for TV and Film geeks worldwide with such gems as Lost, Mission Impossible 3, and Cloverfield under his belt. For months now Fox has been brainwashing its viewers with promos of Abrams's newest TV creation, Fringe. With a reported $10,000,000 spent on the pilot alone, not to mention the eye-catching "from the creators of Lost" tagline, expectations have certainly been high for fans and critics alike. Would it, could it possibly live up to the hype? This past Tuesday was our chance to find out.

Episode Synopsis:

When an international flight lands at Boston's Logan Airport and there are no signs of life, FBI Special Agent Olivia Dunham, a scientist, Walter Bishop, and his son Peter uncover a deadly mystery involving a series of unbelievable events. ([...])

Right out of the gate, the Fringe pilot makes a strong case for being worthy of all the preceding hype. J.J. Abrams' formula for success is all over this thing and it works:

1. A seemingly unknown female lead that will undoubtedly be turned into a star? Check. Australian actress Anna Torv is perfectly cast as FBI Agent Olivia Dunham. She has the strong screen presence and subtle charm needed to be able to carry this series.

2. A somewhat has been actor that will no doubt be reinvented into a rising star? Check. Joshua Jackson (aka Pacey) wooed teen girls for years on the 90's WB sensation, Dawson's Creek. Here he gets a fresh new start as Peter Bishop, genius estranged son of Dr. Walter Bishop. I was pleasantly surprised with the depth of Jackson's performance and the welcome comedy relief he brings to the show.

3. A mega supporting cast? Check. John Noble plays the role of the eccentric, yet endearing Dr. Walter Bishop. I could almost here Middle Earth nerds celebrating worldwide as they realized this is the guy who played Denethor, Steward of Gondor in Lord of the Rings: Return of the King (OK, yeah, I was celebrating, too). Truly, some of the funniest and most engaging scenes are between Walter and Peter Bishop. That's a relationship that I can't wait to see further explored on the show.

Lance Reddick (aka as Matthew Abaddon from Lost) brings a welcome mysterious air to the character of Philip Broyles. We find out early on that he works for Homeland Security, but before the episode's end we can't help but wonder who this guy really is.

Kirk Acevedo, Mark Valley, Blair Brown, and Jasika Nicole also bring strong supporting performances to this well rounded cast.

4. An underlying conspiracy that will only become more mysterious and vague as the show goes on? Check. J.J. Abrams has stated publicly that Fringe will be unlike Lost and Alias in that we will not have to watch every episode to follow the story. I will believe that when I see it. The introduction to "The Pattern" toward the end of the episode seems to hint at an underlying mythology for the series. "The Pattern" is sure to be discussed, analyzed, and mulled over to the extent of the "Dharma Initiative". What is The Pattern exactly? I don't know and neither do you. That is why we will be back for more. Some may consider this an annoying storytelling device, but I love my TV shows served up complex and mind boggling. Bring it on J.J.!!

Fringe is all about exploring fringe science (teleportation, invisibility, time travel, telepathy, etc, etc.). This is where the X-Files feel of the show comes in to play (thankfully J.J. Abrams has also said the show will stay away from aliens). The first scene of the pilot is a shocking and gruesome foreshadowing of what we can expect each week. And what a way to kick off a series! Who doesn't enjoy watching skin falling off of someone's face at 30,000 feet?

There were some other subtle touches that I enjoyed from this first episode. The cinematography was breathtaking throughout and if you haven't watched this show in High Definition you are truly missing out! The special effects were top notch and I especially enjoyed the translucent skin one of the characters was afflicted with. The location subtitles for each scene were very innovative. Much like the titles for each new Heroes episode, the location subtitles were imbedded in really cool places throughout the pilot. This is sure to become a unique Fringe trademark that adds a little more creative depth to the show. The mysterious Massive Dynamic Corporation, the yet to be seen CEO William Bell, and COO Nina Sharp's Terminator-like arm were also intriguing additions to the plot. Indeed a viral Fringe website for Massive Dynamic has already launched.

No doubt Lost fans are going to be looking under every nook and cranny for connections between the two series. Interestingly enough, the new autopilot system used to land the plane in this episode is referred to as the Pearl System. Maybe a not so subtle nod to Lost's Pearl Station? Although I didn't notice, there are reports online that a few of the infamous Lost numbers make appearances throughout the pilot. While I enjoy such shenanigans, I do hope this is nothing more than J.J. Abrams being all cutesy for his Lost fans. If we find out somewhere down the line that Fringe and Lost are interconnected I think my feeble brain will explode.

The only thing working against Fringe is its home on Fox, which has an awful track record of canning great TV shows prematurely. Fans of shows such as Firefly and Drive know exactly what I'm talking about. The buzz and promos certainly lean in the show's favor, but with Fox no show is ever safe. Although I'm sure Fox has already renewed Hole in the Wall for eight seasons. I would love to have seen ABC pick up Fringe and scheduled it next to Lost each week.

I was very impressed with the Fringe pilot and afterwards my wife and I shared that look that can only say, "We've found yet another show to be addicted to". Great writing, strong acting, and an intriguing plot are sure to keep us coming back for more. The great twist at the end of the episode gives us a taste of the strong storytelling that is sure to come with each new installment. If you missed the premiere you still have a chance to catch up. Sunday, September 14th, Fox will be replaying the pilot at 8/7 central with a preview of the new 24 movie coming in November. You can also watch the pilot in glorious HD at Fox's website.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Television Series!, July 12, 2009
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Fringe: The Complete First Season [HD] (Amazon Instant Video)
I downloaded this episode from Amazon because I wanted it on my computer to watch whenever I wanted to.

I found this new series of `Fringe' to be not only creative new material, but also a break in our deteriorating television programming across America.

Our television channels are becoming polluted with undesirable programming like all the court & judge shows out there, cops, shows that show us the dysfunction of others (like Springer and so on). Where is the television entertainment in such shows?

Fringe, on the other hand is entertaining. Its science fiction safe for the whole family. The language is careful and its fun to watch.

We need more television shows like Fringe.

Reporter Joseph Toth
Washington Micro Bank BBS
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars THE HEIR TO THE X-FILES....., April 29, 2009
This review is from: Fringe: Season 1 (DVD)
you can't mention Fringe without at least mentioning The X-Files in passing- since Fringe is this generation's version of The X-Files. Fringe borrows the same abnormal and paranormal themes.

that being said, since TXF is now history, I look at Fringe as "the next best thing" in terms of suspense, intrigue, and the paranormal being broadcast these days on TV. Beyond any doubt, Fringe is one of the best produced shows currently on TV b/c the writing is so clever and we (the audience) actually care about the characters and the struggles they go through.

The cast could not be better: John Noble is superb, and Anna Torv and Josh Jackson have good chemistry together (much like Scully and Mulder).

Producer JJ Abrams (Lost, Alias, Star Trek, Mission: Impossible 3) has another winner on his hands with Fringe.

* Highly recommended *
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quality SF, May 18, 2012
This is so good that even those of my friends and family who have no particular interest in SF are hooked. The storyline is clever and compelling, with both stand-alone episodes and others that advance the longer story arc. You could conceivably skip episodes but I can't imagine why you'd want to.

What really makes this series are the stellar performances, most notably by John Noble, an actor so fine I'm at a loss to praise him as much as he deserves. He is riveting - charming, crazy, childlike, sly, ferociously intelligent, off the wall, always surprising. A real joy to watch. Anna Torv is spot on as Olivia Dunham, reserved, smart, brave, wounded but carrying on in a quiet and affecting way. She never strikes a pose and that alone is a rarity. Compare her beautifully unflashy and genuine manner to the ludicrous carryings on of Joanne Kelly as Myka of Warehouse 13, who appears to think every scene is a fashion shoot. Joshua Jackson as Peter Bishop is growing as an actor before our eyes, and growing into a part that slowly reveals the character to be much deeper than we initially were led to believe.

Visually, the series is outstanding and, if the actors weren't so strong, they'd be hard put to compete with Walter's lab and the scene-stealing Jean the cow. The supporting cast is completely up to the mark. With such a strong start, and what is obviously a carefully thought out backstory with exceptional writing to support it, my only fear is that this series won't have a chance to play out to the end due to its unfortunate venue: Fox, the network that's notorious for killing all their most promising children before they can walk. This particular child, however, is already running so maybe there's hope.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review of the BD set not the show, September 10, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
If you're looking at this, I assume you already have interest in this unique show, so I will focus this review on the blu-ray release. First things first, the cover has a cool reflective casing, with two different images. Nice touch considering the content of the show itself. It has the usual flip type case for multiple discs that we've seen in sets like Die Hard and Blade Runner. I actually prefer the flip cases to smaller individual cases. Also has multiple images on the CD's, the cover and the inside, nice touch. That's about it for cosmetics.

There is over 7 hours of bonus features including the bd-live content. BD-live is a very cool feature to have, even if you aren't utilizing it now, you might be in the near future and it includes a single insert with instructions on how to get started.

Special features exclusive on blu-ray include Fringe Pattern Analysis: Take a Closer Look at 6 select scenes with the experts. These are actually really nice, as they focus on select scenes, instead of just some broad behind the scenes generalization that you usually get as an "extra". And also additional writer/production commentary available through bd-live.

Some other goodies:

Featurettes on the show's creation, casting, the real science behind it and a great look at the special effects.
There is the feature of Fringe: Deciphering the Scene Sidebars on every episode, this is an interesting add-on. I thought it was cool.
Disected Files and Unaired scenes are here. Alot of extras involved in indiviual episodes, which I thought was great and any fan of the show will like, as I'm sure we all have our favorites and our "not-so-favorites."

I give this blu-ray set a enthusiastic thumbs up for all the extras. It's appreciated. I'm a fan of behind the scenes info and if you are as well, you'll enjoy this set.

Now, for the look. I have a blu-ray player (PS3) and an HDTV and all I can say, is beautiful. If you want to see what its capable of...this is it. The colors practically bleed off of the screen.

This is the best blu-ray package I've received since the Blade Runner release.
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31 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An intellectual's x-files, November 11, 2008
By 
Moss Parker "moss_parker" (Beavercreek, OH United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Fringe: Season 1 (DVD)
People are going to compare this show to The X-Files. While superficially the comparison is reasonable, it fails on the whole premise of what is happening in each Fringe episode. The emphasis of the X-Files was the paranormal, the emphasis of Fringe is fringe science. I have only seen 6 episodes (more on that later), but Fringe presents things that are not really not too bizarre to actually be discounted only on their "face validity".

I actually worked with several DARPA programs between 1999 and 2005 as both an adviser and a principal investigator. When I first attended a DARPA program meeting I thought I was entering a science fiction convention. I was totally amazed at what was being funded, and how "fringe" much of it was (go to the DARPA website and peruse the programs). In 2002, at a meeting with a DARPA director in an attempt to determine if I wanted to join the agency as a program director I was actually told "Next week we are going to demonstrate teleportation". Of course, my jaw dropped and was finally assured that this wasn't Star Trek and that they were ONLY going to teletransport one atom. But, this is DARPA.

Anyway, Fringe presents DARPAesque things in a rather amusing manner and provides reasonable scientific explanation (obviously set for normal US TV viewer consumption) for what is going on. Dr. Bishop is the perfect character to pull this off. Even when I was thinking that this was getting too "Outer Limits" his jovial explanation made me say "why not, maybe?"

So, I consider Fringe to be an excellent series and I hope that it continues for at least as long as the X-Files. My only regret is that I didn't "find" the series until it was well past episode 10 in real time, and I found it on [...]. My hope is that FOX will find a way to get me caught up in some manner before the end of the season. Otherwise I will have to resort to buying the DVD collection and hope that I can view the final episodes before the start of the new season.

This show really rates 5 stars.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars SHOW GOT STRONGER OVER TIME--HAS POTENTIAL, August 17, 2009
This review is from: Fringe: Season 1 (DVD)
The first episode of this show was barely watchable. I did not watch this show again until about half way through the series. Much to my surprise, I noticed that it had vastly improved and showed potential for the future. Unlike many tv shows today, this does not have a major film star in the lead. Assuming the show could get a major film star, the acting would probably be stronger. Assuming the show can't get a major film star, then the actors they've got aren't worth changing. They are basically doing the job. Anna Torv as the FBI agent and Joshua Jackson, as the mad scientist's son, are fine. Jackson reminds me a great deal of a young William Peterson (Gus Grissom in CSI), the way he was back in his TO LIVE AND DIE IN LA and MANHUNTER acting days. If Jackson continues to develop that resemblance, he probably has a lock on this show.

The best actor is John Noble, who plays Walter Bishop, the insane scientist who has been locked up in a mental institution for years. The government now needs Walter Bishop because there are many strange things happening and he is the only person who may be able to figure it out. If you remove this character/actor from the show, it would be like driving a stake through its heart. He is critical to it. He is also the only character with humor so far and these shows need comic relief in order to succeed.

As I've come to grasp the essence of the show, leading edge scientific experiments have led to certain people being able to bend the dimensions of the universe, such as space, time, etc., Odd things are happening all over, which were at one time beyond the rules of physics. One can only hope to fight these rips in the fabric of the physics of the universe by using the most brilliant scientist one can find. Ergo, the use of Walter Bishop. Walter must be tended because he is NOT recovered from his mental break. Thus, his son must babysit him plus an FBI agent must remain on top of the two of them constantly.

The things which keep happening in the present day continue to get weirder and weirder and by the end of the show one is ready for some really big event. The show delivers and leaves you waiting for season two. I think this has very strong promise.

Visit my blog with link given on my profile page here or use this phonetically given URL (livingasseniors dot blogspot dot com). Friday's entry will always be weekend entertainment recs from my 5 star Amazon reviews in film, tv, books and music. These are very heavy on buried treasures and hidden gems. My blogspot is published on Monday, Wednesday & Friday.
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