The Killing 3 Seasons 2011

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Season 1
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(1,238) IMDb 8.2/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

1. Pilot TV-14 CC

On her last day of work, homicide detective Sarah Linden is drawn into a new case about the disappearance of a teenage girl, Rosie Larsen.

Starring:
Mireille Enos, Billy Campbell
Runtime:
46 minutes
Original air date:
April 3, 2011

Available in HD on supported devices.

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Pilot [HD]

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Season 1
Available on Prime

Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, Mystery
Director Patty Jenkins
Starring Mireille Enos, Billy Campbell
Supporting actors Joel Kinnaman, Michelle Forbes, Brent Sexton, Kristin Lehman, Eric Ladin, Brendan Sexton III, Jamie Anne Allman, Annie Corley, Callum Keith Rennie, Tom Butler, Katie Findlay, Liam James, Kacey Rohl, Garry Chalk, Brandon Jay McLaren, Evan Bird, Seth Isaac Johnson, Richard Harmon
Season year 2011
Network AMC
Executive Producer Piv Bernth
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Format: DVD
Note: Many people felt cheated at the resolution of Season One when questions about the central mystery were still unresolved. So beware, if this is a deal breaker for you--"The Killing" may not satisfy exactly what you are expecting.

AMC, having established itself a leader in smart and sophisticated counter-programming (Mad Men, Breaking Bad, The Walking Dead, Rubicon), serves up another winner with "The Killing"--an adaptation of a successful Danish television series. I, personally, look at the show as the thematic cousin to "Twin Peaks" albeit with a completely different tone and vibe. Both shows center around the murder of a girl, both even feature the tagline "Who Killed.....(Rosie Larsen and Laura Palmer, respectively)," both chart three similar storylines, and both shows met with viewer hostility when the season didn't fully wrap up the murder mystery. In both, we see the investigation progress, we see the painful aftermath on the girl's family and friends, and we see how the murder may be tied to local politicians and bigwigs. That, of course, is where the similarities cease. "The Killing" is a deadly serious and contemplative drama set in Seattle--not at all encumbered with the quirky eccentricities that defined that other Washington State township. It is an intense and quiet show with a slow build--those eager for easy answers and constant action may need to look elsewhere. The pace of "The Killing" is more akin to the unraveling of a fine novel.

Through successive episodes, the path to identifying the murderer becomes increasingly muddy. Steely and determined Mireille Enos play the intrepid lead investigator haunted by past mistakes. She is unable to move on with her own life and, in fact, sacrifices potential happiness in her dogged pursuit of justice.
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36 of 43 people found the following review helpful By carol irvin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 4, 2011
update: I did not keep watching this series because it was identical to the Danish one, almost frame for frame. Imagine my surprise then to hear that viewers were in an uproar when it finished this week because there is a cliffhanger instead of a resolution plus (evidently) the murderer in the American version is not going to be the same person as in the Danish original. I was amazed because the Danish one could not have ended in a more clear cut and logical fashion. The murder was solved. The murderer was someone quite logical and a "person of interest" throughout to the investigators. My recommendation is now to go find the Danish one, which is excellent. It is too bad that the Americans didn't just keep reproducing it frame for frame, the way they started out.

This is an American remake of a Danish tv series of the same name. I have seen the entire Danish tv series. This is a very faithful and well done recreation of the series yet changes it to English language and Seattle rather than Copenhagen. There are some fairly minor differences so far between the two scripts. For example, the lead detective, a woman, has a real battleaxe of a mother staying with her in the Danish version as she's getting ready for her second marriage in three weeks time. She has been eliminated in the American version but she is the only character to be eliminated. Since I found the mother very annoying, I don't see that as a flaw. Some other slight differences: her underling male detective in the American version is not hostile to her like he is in the Danish one. In fact, they seem to get along; the male politician in Copenhagen is a lot more complex character than he is in Seattle but that may be because Copenhagen politics are downright baffling.
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AMC, having established itself a leader in smart and sophisticated counter-programming (Mad Men, Breaking Bad, The Walking Dead, Rubicon), serves up another winner with "The Killing"--an adaptation of a successful Danish television series. I, personally, look at the show as the thematic cousin to "Twin Peaks" albeit with a completely different tone and vibe. Both shows center around the murder of a girl, both even feature the tagline "Who Killed.....(Rosie Larsen and Laura Palmer, respectively)," and both chart three similar storylines. We see the investigation progress, we see the painful aftermath on the girl's family and friends, and we see how the murder may be tied to local politicians and bigwigs. That, of course, is where the similarities cease. "The Killing" is a deadly serious and contemplative drama set in Seattle--not at all encumbered with the quirky eccentricities that defined that other Washington State township. It is an intense and quiet show with a slow build--those eager for easy answers and constant action may need to look elsewhere. The pace of "The Killing" is more akin to the unraveling of a fine novel.

Through successive episodes, the path to identifying the murderer becomes increasingly muddy. Steely and determined Mireille Enos play the intrepid lead investigator haunted by past mistakes. She is unable to move on with her own life and, in fact, sacrifices potential happiness in her dogged pursuit of justice. Her replacement (only he can't replace her when she won't leave!) is the offbeat Joel Kinnaman. Both humorous and strangely intense, the two forge an uneasy relationship that provides a lot of conflict, drama, and unexpected laughs. On another front, the always terrific Michelle Forbes and Brendan Sexton III play the deceased girl's parents.
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