Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.95
  • Save: $2.16 (15%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Pink has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by NorthEastBooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: **FAST SHIPPING!!** 100% satisfaction guaranteed!!** Looks like a typical used book with some shelf wear** We carefully inspected this item**
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Pink Paperback – November 10, 1998


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.79
$7.52 $0.01

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Anchor; Reprint edition (November 10, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385493533
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385493536
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,156,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Filmmaker Van Sant's (Drugstore Cowboy, My Own Private Idaho) fictional debut is a tepid tale of a director of TV infomercials and his adventures with a pair of would-be film types, perhaps from another dimension, one of whom resembles his dead lover; they are all surrounded by other slackers in places like Las Vegas and Sasquatch, Oregon. Whatever its small merits, the novel is made harrowingly pretentious by Van Sant's noodling of the medium?he employs footnotes, different typefaces, flip drawings, and the like. (It's not so much Tristram Shandy as just a shanty.) However compelling one finds the author's images on film and video, in print they're pretty flat.?David Bartholomew,
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Independent filmmaker Van Sant's first novel recalls his My Own Private Idaho's collagelike texture, its central male-male relationship, and, under the transparent pseudonym Felix Arroyo, its costar, the late River Phoenix. Dead from a drug-induced "misadventure in the gutter . . . in front of [a] nightclub" (sound familiar?) when the book begins, Felix starred in many of the "informmercials" made by 52-year-old still-aspiring director Spunky Davis. He was homosexual Spunky's obsession, too, and it isn't surprising that Spunky is now gaga over blond Jack, who greatly resembles Felix and who is inseparable from dark Matt (Phoenix was paired with Keanu Reeves in Idaho). As Spunky lives out his infatuation, he discovers that both young men are visitants from the Pink (the place referred to by the expression in the pink), where Felix is now permanently ensconced. Spunky tells most of what story there is, but other narrative continuums frequently interrupt him (two of these concern a dead rock star whose avatar Matt may be). Imagine a William S. Burroughs extravaganza without the grotesque sex, the drug taking, and the wild-and-woolly humor. That is Pink. How odd. Ray Olson --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By foundpoem on May 28, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Gus Van Sant, my favorite director, couldn't pull off this novel. Oh, what a bummer. Even his grammar is fairly poor. It's clear he's a visual person/artist - not just because he drew some of the scenes and people in the book, but the descriptions, too, are vibrant with great visual detail.
I'm avoiding the inevitable - fairly bad book. I agree with much of the reviews. It's an homage, dedicated to River Pheonix (a rather roundabout dedication that I know is one only because I read it is, and the word "river" is in the verse), that references perhaps a number of the young men Van Sant works with or, perhaps predominantly, River and Keanu. I couldn't help but think Affleck and Damon read this and preyed on the "dirty old man" to pitch their script; he does love friendships between two young men--something that plays so beautifully in his films, and so poorly with a fifty-something narrator who's part of the story.
In "Pink" the main character writes in the first person, but in the footnotes refers to himself as his name. He's an infomercial maker in his 50's and not very successful. He meets two young boys, Jack and Matt, and is intrigued by them. They've got a secret. "Pink" is their secret and I won't say what Pink is because we don't find out for most of the book.
One of the boys is eerily similar to the dead infomercial-spokesman/teen-idol, Felix. Felix = River Pheonix. He even died in the street outside a nightclub (Felix, that is) while his brother called 911; he is 23-years-old; and his complexion, described in amazing technicolor detail, River's. We've got lots of detail about Felix here and, as someone else wrote, how much of that is non-fiction? Ouch.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 15, 1999
Format: Paperback
Though I appreciated and respect that Van Sant tried to create something different here, that alone was not enough. The central problem with the book is that the story line is far too weak. Some of my favorite authors also use a style that jumps around a bit and slowly pieces together a story (e.g., Vonnegut, Dunn, Robbins), yet Pink fails where these authors succeed. Initially, I found the book fun to read because of the varying style, fonts, perspectives, etc., yet quickly became bored with it as I searched in vain for an interesting story line that could be construed as gripping. Nothing of the sort presented itself. If an experimental and loose writing style alone does it for you, than this is a good book to read. If you desire content that will captivate you and sustain your interest, look elsewhere.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 12, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I initially purchased PINK after seeing on the jacket cover a quote comparing it to Robbins and Vonnegut. Unfortunatley all I found was the style of Robbins without the wit and the essence of Vonnegut but without the closure he provides. I had fun reading it, peeling through Van Sant's veiled references to contemporary pop culture icons Kurt/Courtney/River/Keanu,etc. But was ultimately dissapointed in the lack of "story" in this novel. Would I recommend it? Only to a masochist.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By David Robinson on August 20, 2001
Format: Paperback
I'll admit it:
I bought this book because I liked the cover.
It has a matte finish, and I love books like that. It usually signals that there is something important inside. And with this being written by Director, Gus Van Sant, I thought that my suspicions might be confirmed. After all, the blurbs on the back described "Pink" as being like the works of Vonnegut. Enough said! Vonnegut is one of my heroes, and since I've read everything he's written, I figured an author *like* him would be suitable for the time being.
Oh, how misled I was!
"Pink" is a jumbled, nearly indecipherable mess of a novel. It is littered with characters about whom we give not a damn. There are scenes that take place in Orlando, FL, where I lived for a few years. It is apparent that Van Sant knows nothing about the area -- talking about highways, for example, that simply do not exist. How hard would it have been to take a look at a map? This is just one way that his lazy, thoughtless writing is evidenced. It makes "Pink" look suspiciously like a first draft -- written once, never to be checked for such details, or larger things, like, say, plot or character.
There are clever allusions to dead rock stars and dead actors, like that is supposed to somehow make the novel thought-provoking. "Hey, isn't that River Phoenix? And didn't Van Sant do a movie with him?" Yeah, and who cares? There are footnotes, which, I guess, are meant to be clever. They are not. This is not to say that they can't be. Dave Barry knows how to use footnotes. "House of Leaves" uses footnotes to excellent effect. These are just a waste of time.
Much like the entire book, as a matter of fact.
Perhaps the only good thing about it is the flipbook cartoon, which may indicate that Van Sant should really stick with moving pictures and abandon the literary ones.
Not recommended. At all. Ever.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By breepa on January 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
I was drawn to this book because I'm a Gus Van Sant fan, and I knew it dealt with River Phoenix and Keanu Reeves and the filming of "My Own Private Idaho", one of my favorite films. I'm a shameless queer culture junkie, and anything suggesting salacious real-life happenings grabs my attention instantly.

Van Sant takes us on an interesting trip through his attempts to cope with the loss of River, who was a close friend. There are characters based on River, Keanu, Kurt Cobain, Flea, and others, and it's fun to try to guess who's who, and how much of the backstory is true and how much is, as the book is classified, fiction.

There's no doubt that Van Sant took liberties with his thinly-veiled characters, but if I had the chance to write about having a long-standing affair with Keanu Reeves, I probably would too, so I can't judge Gus too harshly for that self-indulgence.

What's clear is that Van Sant cared a great deal about the people he's written about, and that facing a sudden, senseless death of a close friend makes for difficult times.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again