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Pinocchio Hardcover – April 1, 2011


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About the Author

Born in 1970, Winshluss is the creator of numerous comics and graphic novels that have garnered awards and acclaim across Europe. Winshluss is the pen name of Vincent Parronnaud, perhaps best known as co-director of the animated film Persepolis (with Marjane Satrapi), which won the Jury Prize at Cannes and was nominated for numerous awards, including the Academy Award, Golden Globe and Cannes' Palm d'Or. Currently, he and Satrapi are teaming up again to adapt Satrapi's 2006 book "Chicken with Plums.”
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Last Gasp (April 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 086719751X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0867197518
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 2 x 12 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.9 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,079,317 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dusty Bottoms is Dead & Gone on May 28, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Kidding about reading it to my kids. This is for adults only; no child should ever see a woman riding Pinocchio's face.

Winshluss, whose real name is Vincent Paronnaud, is yet another amazing French comic artist and filmmaker. If he's best known for anything, it would be cowriting and codirecting with Marjane Satrapi the animated film Persepolis. Now that I've finally gotten a chance to read some of his work, it's easy to see why many consider him one of the best comic artists of his generation. His 'freely adapted' version of Pinocchio is grim, perverse, satiric and gorgeously illustrated.

Though comical, it's also tragic. W's Pinocchio is practically wordless yet it manages to make dark allegorical commentary on a sordid post-industrial civilization. It's not a retelling, but more of a re-imagining, and it involves other familiar characters as well. I love how all the smaller segmenting story-lines weave in and out of the main plot and ultimately have direct impact on Geppetto and Pinocchio.

This book is the epitome of a 'rare gem' in the comic medium. It's easily one of the best I've read. The book itself is of top-notch quality. There's no dust-jacket; instead Winshluss's invitingly bewildering artwork is stuck right on the cover. Parts of it shimmer; it's gorgeous. The paper is of stock quality. It's like opening up a book and walking into an art gallery. A graphic novel really can't look any better than this.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Trey Williams on January 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Let me preface this by saying that I work in a small comic shop. Having gotten sick of superheroes (we're a very small shop, so I have a lot of down time) I turned my attention to European comics as a means to explore something different. I got into Matz, Tardi, Moebius,among others and on a whim, I ordered Winshluss' Pinocchio.
This book is incredible. It's a fresh, adult take on a popular legend that has permeated our culture through cartoons, kid's books, and the like. But, Winshluss goes in a new direction with this book, and embraces all the angles that modern society would deal with Pinocchio (from a sex slave to a unstoppable soldier of death).
The art is beautiful, and the dialogue minimalistic, but this provides for a truly artistic experience, with the story going on for a dozen plus pages without any text, forcing you to focus on the images presented.
If you're looking for a children's take on the story, based on memories of the Disney movie, then this might not be for you. But if you're looking for something different, or a classic look at the wooden boy, then this is definitely the book for you. But, if you are willing to embrace a new, fresh (adult) take on a classic, then this is a great choice.
Plus, Jiminy Cricket is a depressed, alcoholic squatter in Pinocchio's head! Tell me that's not worth a read!
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Format: Hardcover
Brought to North America by San Francisco-based Last Gasp publishing following the English translation and release by Knockabout Books in London, Pinocchio was originally published in Winshluss' native French and won the highly sought after Grand Prize at the 2009 Angouleme Comics Festival. Winshluss is the pen name of Vincent Paronnaud, perhaps better known to American audiences from his work with Marjane Satrapi on the animated version of Persepolis.

Influenced thematically by the 1880s Italian serial fiction by Carlo Collodi known as The Adventures of Pinocchio, Winshluss' version upholds the darker and more sinister elements of the original story. Unlike the Disney-fication of many folk and fairy tales, where the primary story is essentially neutered of horrific elements in favor of more child-friendly fare, Winshluss' adaptation incorporates many of Collodi's traditional plot elements while embracing an innovative and at times disturbing reinvention of the tale itself. For example, Collodi's first vision of a tragic ending for Pinocchio where the puppet is hanged--something that Collodi altered in later editions--finds ample exploration in this updated version, as do aspects of the harlequinade that colored the original. Where Pinocchio differs from the popular perception of the wooden-boy turned human is numerous.

First, borrowing a page from Steven Speilberg's Artificial Intelligence, Winshluss transforms the main character into a robot. Gone as well are the lies and associated growing nose, replaced instead by a cold, steel appendage that finds new, degenerate uses from Geppetto's sex-starved wife. Pinocchio is not crafted for companionship or the amusement of children, but rather brazen capitalism and greed to satiate the puppeteer's own avarice.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Jenkins on May 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I was attracted to the amazing cover of this book when I spotted it at a local comic shop. Upon pulling off the shrink wrap (this book is shrink wrapped for good reason -- the content is definitely not for children), I was disappointed at first by the cartoony art inside. However, as I started reading, I became more and more impressed by how the story was put together and I even appreciated the artwork. Apart from the darkly humorous vignettes with "Jiminy Cockroach", who takes up residence in Pinocchio's skull, the book is almost wordless, and the creator employs a variety of art styles. In addition to Pinocchio, who is here a robot built by Gepetto to be a military weapon, other beloved Disney characters like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Bambi appear in dark and twisted versions. There is also some savage political satire. Highly recommended to those who think this sounds like their kind of thing. The presentation by Last Gasp is first rate. This a book you will likely want to tell friends about.
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