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127 of 136 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pioneer takes the Yellow Jersey in Mid-Range Receivers
Despite the rather disappointing announcement of their departure from the Plasma arena and the de facto departure from in-house blu ray players, Pioneer appears to have made a bold move into the highly competitive mid-range receiver market. Denon and Onkyo have released fiercely competitive models in the $700 price-range that couple either excellent video processing,...
Published on July 31, 2010 by WDH

versus
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great sound and video but restricted PassThrough ??
I started with the Onkyo 508. Failed HDMI in first month and poor Onkyo Service had the unit for over 1 month with no part to fix it. Luckily Amazon backed me up and gave me a refund even after my 30 days was up. Next I tried the Denon 1611. Excellent sound but constant HDMI dropouts so you could not really enjoy it. Finally the Pioneer 1120 !! Ease of setup is as good...
Published on December 16, 2010 by Brenda G. Smith


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127 of 136 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pioneer takes the Yellow Jersey in Mid-Range Receivers, July 31, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
Despite the rather disappointing announcement of their departure from the Plasma arena and the de facto departure from in-house blu ray players, Pioneer appears to have made a bold move into the highly competitive mid-range receiver market. Denon and Onkyo have released fiercely competitive models in the $700 price-range that couple either excellent video processing, streamed media, and ample connectivity. My recent review of the Denon AVR891 confirmed their continued competitive product line, but I did lament it lacked some of the swiss army knife approach sometimes imperfectly utilized by Onkyo (the 891 lacks internet-streaming, surround wide processing, and basic rear-panel connectivity). That said, Denon's use of the ABT chipset (begun last year with the ABT-2010 and continued this year with the ABT-2015) was my preferred AVR video processing (I performed it over Reon XV, Farjouda chips, and lower spec'd ABT chips).

Having owned the 1120's successor both in elite (21) and no-elite (9040) form, I was always impressed by their power, sonic quality, and design. That said, they lacked what had rapidly become basic featureset in 2009 (wide or height presence configuration, only four hdmi inputs, and only analogue video processing). The 1120's little brother the VSX-1020 established a reasonably high bar for the 1120 to hurdle in bringing internet radio, iphone control, six hdmi, and wide/height processing in a tidy package widely available under $500. That said, the 1020 was a very compotent and efficient entry-level receiver, but lacked some of the longer legs for bigger rooms or thirsty speakers. Enter the 1120.

The 1120 shares the same deep chassis of the 9140 and Elite 21. At over 17" deep, it is almost four inches deeper and four pounds heavier than the 1020. It's also over two inches deeper and four and a half pounds heavier than the Denon 891. The design is conservative and almost identical to last year's 9040 with a front fascia that is masculine and angular. Beneath the pop-out front input cover are a USB port for Iphone and Ipod playback, an HDMI port and the setup microphone input. The HDMI input is a nice touch for camcorders and other temporary connected inputs (Onkyo offers similar with 708 while Denon has six rear-mounted HDMI inputs).

The rear panel is also similar to last year's 9040, but four more speaker binding posts have been added for height and wide processing (Pioneer uses MCACC wide since the auto-callibration software is not done via Audyssey DSX). Importantly, the Pioneer has 9.1 pre-outs for those looking to use an external amplifier. Unfortunately, this connectivity has been removed from the Denon AVR2311 and 891 that are natural competitors of the 1120 by price alone.

The remote is very similar to the 1020 in layout, but it is backlit and contains XM and Zone 3. While Pioneer's remote is not as easily identified with small, similar buttons compared to the Denon, it is learning and back-lit, which is a step ahead of the 891/2311/991/3311. Onyko offers a learning remote in the TX NR708, but is not fully backlit.

Setting up the receiver with MCACC is quick and easy, but each MCACC setting measures the white noise and reverb from speakers from only a single memory point whereas Audyssey MultiEQ in the Denon incorporates multiple locations' measurements. This might have an impact on callibration depending on the layout of one's room. That said, I find both tend have a significant impact on accuracy and each have their tweaking benefits.

Once I had setup my 5.1 plus heights layout, I was very impressed with the 1120. While it appears to share a lot of the same audio section with the 9040, it seems to have a wider soundstage, which might have something to do with the presence speakers (I was previously passively bi-amping the height speakers with the 9040). After listening to a variety of blu rays and SACDs from my Oppo, I was nothing but amazed by the power and quality of the sound. Please keep in mind I am of the school that callibrated mid and entry level receivers tend to offer about the same quality audio with incremental differences - speakers (and power to push them) have the biggest impact on quality. That said, this is a very capable receiver that keeps putting me in trouble with my wife to turn it down!

The 1120 really shines in video processing with the Marvell Qdeo chip that offers very similar deinterlacing proficiency to the ABT-2015, but shines with multiple noise reduction settings. On my 54" panasonic plasma, I have found that video processing via the 1120's noise reduction settings does help clean up noisy 1080i hd programing. That said, its benefit is incremental, and like all video processors, is not magical in its ability to render standard definition sources as blu ray quality. The video processing settings are applicable per input, which is ideal considering most people should only use it for cable boxes and not bdps.

While this receiver does have a few noticeable shortcomings (lack of on screen display and pandora streaming), it is an incredible package at its current street price floating between $600 and $700. Its rare ability to not molest hdmi video and apply meaningful noise reduction is excellent. Its power, flexibility, and connectivity is excellent, though I would like to see 7.1 MCH inputs. All in all, it's a very competitive offering and highly recommended.
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34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solid performance at a bargain price, November 12, 2010
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This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
This review is written from someone who has never had the experience of an A/V receiver before. So when I started looking around, I immediately felt like I was in deep water. It's worse than choosing a car, I swear. I wanted something cheap enough to be affordable now, but have enough features and specs to enable me to use it even as I expand/improve my home theater in the coming years. But I spent a lot of time combing through reviews online, product specifications, and forums before settling on this bad boy. I even went so far as to create a spreadsheet that compared weighted values of features and specs. Yeah, talk about nerd alert. So here's my overall impression. If you want to skip to the end, there's some important notes that I was confused about while purchasing that might help out.

Aesthetically, it's very sexy. I was kind of turned off from a lot of other models that had a slew of buttons or other such clutter on the front. I prefer the sleek facade. It does have enough buttons on the front to give you a good deal of functionality, without making the front look like a remote. The overall construction is very solid. The buttons don't feel cheap, the knobs are solid and turn smoothly. Although the front is plastic, it looks very nice and I'm quite sure it's polycarbonate, which is very tough. It sure does have some heft to it as well, which is reassuring. All of the speaker connections on the back feel sturdy.

The connections available on this boggle the mind. There's anything you could ever need. Sure, there's other models that have 481692437 HDMI connections, but seriously who needs that many? I can't think of how you could even use more than the 5 inputs the 1120 gives you. It offers up to 7.1 surround, which would have been real nice if they'd offered 7.2, but I'll survive. It is listed as 110 watts per channel. I realize the whole controversy about how little this can tell you and that most manufacturers inflate these numbers. But the total output is still a hefty 400 watts, which should be enough for most anyone who doesn't have power-gobbling speakers. And if your speakers are that thirsty, what are you doing looking at a mid-range receiver? The remote is a bit crowded, but makes sense once you take a minute and look at it. Plus it's got a lot of functionality as a universal remote, with preset codes for many manufacturers included in the Pioneer manual. It's a breeze to set up, and I can now control all of my electronics - except the PS3 - with my receiver remote. The backlight button is well placed, my only gripe here is that once the buttons are lit there's still no way to tell what the button does even if you can see it, so you still look like you're shooting in the dark. Lighting up the labels would have been nice, or some sort of distinguishing feature on the buttons themselves.

As for features, this has plenty. I don't much care for the i-phone connectivity, since I don't much care for i-phones. It'd have been nice if they had upped the ante to include "smartphone connectivity" instead. but something I might not have used anyway. The upscaling Marvell chipset does a very nice job of taking even standard definition pictures and making them look like 1080i. Based on my non-professional opinion, it seems to handle it better than my PS3. The on-screen menu is a god-send, I can't imagine having to set all of the options available through the tiny screen on the front of the unit. it's relatively intuitive, and not hard to find what you're looking for. Which is impressive given the number of options available. Setting up the MCACC was a breeze, and I found that I was very happy with the arrangement that it gave me. I would have preferred a little more bass, but then again I don't have a subwoofer yet.

You are also given several different sound options, which is nice. I preferred the direct setting for music, which bypasses much of the audio processing, which projected a more clear, authentic sound. For movies I left it on the Auto Surround setting, which did wonderfully for a full sound stage. I won't be using the Sirius satellite radio, but I guess it's neat that it's there, in case I change my mind in the future. The neat thing for me was the network capability. I haven't set up the internet radio yet, but I probably will.

I love this product, and would buy it again in a second. It sounds great, pushes plenty of power to my Klipsch speakers, and finally gives me a terrific anchor for my home theater system with tons of upward capability still. For the price it's going at, this is the best you'll find for your money. Happy listening.

*Notes*

Although this unit contains speaker connections for 9 speakers, there's limited capability for what you can use at a time. The gist of it is that it allows you to do 7.1 with either front wide/height OR rear surround, 5.1 with a second zone, or 5.1 with passively bi-amped front speakers (which is my current set-up).

C-net did a review of the Pioneer VSX-1020-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver in which they said that it lacks HDMI passthrough. This may or may not be true for the 1020, but there seemed to be nothing I could find on if the 1120 contained HDMI passthrough and most seemed to assume it did not. Let me be the one to say unequivocally that the 1120 does indeed support HDMI passthrough, and I was using it just last night.
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48 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars it was hard but..good thing i waited...., August 2, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
like so many of you i waited, try to look at as many reviews as possible, weight the pros and cons of every manufacturer and at the end for a number of resons i decide to go w the 1120. i was lucky enough that i got mine at an incredible price from [...] through amazon and pay less the MSRP, and also got one of the very first units 3 weeks before arrives in amazon, which give me some time to put it to the test before writing this review. First things first, the unit looks amazing it is heavier and deeper than the 1020, set up took me about 2 hours ,is a good idea to take it easy and READ through the manual as much as you can since you can easily bypass important info that relates directly to your receiver functioning the way it should, for example have all the speaker connections ready and well identified if possible and take note of which components and what inputs are being used so you dont go crazy later trying to remember what is where, (before plugging the unit) obvious to do for some audiophiles, but not so, to the guys that are running to listen to this baby in action...!!
for reference only, this is my set up:
TV: 60pg60 Plasma (60 inch)
directv HD
BD: Playstation 3 Slim
GC: XBox 360,
GC:WII black
MP: HD media player (western Difital) w 2 TB hard drive.
Also using an universal remote control (Harmony 900)
Everything is behind cabinet doors away from view.
All of this components are connected to the 1120 via HDMI (except wii) and the output HDMI 1.4 to the tv, so inmediatly i free up space on my tv and dont have more than 1 cable attached to it. SET UP is very easy though, for internet connection im using a point of acces (netgear) wireless, and installation has being a breeze, the reciever identified the connection and had a whole bunch of internet radio stations pre-installed that i can edit, add, or delete if i want to. I also have the iphone and to be honest the one feature that i was looking forward to use and test was to being able to watch my music videos and movies on my plasma and i can assure anyone: i was not disapointed!!, the quality is VERY GOOD, and yes, in the event of receiving a phone call it pauses and than continues once you hang up. Same with music, even though the GUI could have being a little more sophisticated it was easy to navigate through both music and videos, also have the icontrolav app, and is not as bad as some audiophiles may say, yes is very basic, and you need to be in front of your receiver for it to work, but i like the fact that you can swith inputs as well as volume , balance, and a few more things... As Far as VIDEO.. even my wife could see a difference..YEs is noticeable even with my cable box (directv) and WII console. Also the resolution out of my WD media center is only 480P but it seems to be 720 or more (depending on the file) thanks to the marvel Chip that drives the 1120. by the way, most of the movies i have in the media center are compressed using an MKV file, and they view in dvd quality and sound, and talking about.. SOUND...finally,.. I have this receiver paired up with Definitive technologies PRO800 series speakers (5.1 configuration) and my living room is open to my kitchen a good 25ft by 15ft w ceilings 10ft high. i tested the receiver for a number of days with both music and movies, it was delightful to hear some of my old dvd and see them again with the 1120, in movies like matrix or Pirates the caribean you could hear clean ,crisp, loud explosion, rain, bone crushing without distortion even at high volume, new movies like shutter island, or avatar are amazing to the point that even at very low volumes is a treat for the ears..Andrea Boccelli concerts, Marylin Manson or Duran-Duran put you and any listener in the middle of it..in voice detail as well as high and low frequencies,instruments never sounded so good, bass is up to you,no complaints at all here, the only thing is that i did have a bit of a problem trying to decide which sound decoder to use, there are so many options and they all sound great, i think neo 6 + THX and Dolby proIIz + THX may be my favorites for both movies and music but that's just me. in case theres any doubt..SOUND is really IMPRESSIVE, the options galore, great video processing, THX, Internet radio, i phone connectivity and much more have made me a true believer on Pioneer, im glad i waited and glad that i did not received a bad unit, it happens with every manufacurer out there no matter wether is pioneer, Onkyo or APPLE...but my experience with the 1120k has being A+ all the way...will do an update in a few weeks after more "testing". but if anybody has any questions specifically let me know and will try to reply asap.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Incredible Receiver for the Money!, November 2, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
Purchased this receiver last week from Amazon for $425.00 with 50.00 rebate I found on another website with direct link to Amazon. At almost half the cost of the equivalent Denon and Onkyo receivers and more features this is a bargain. Sound was not great out of the box but MCACC got my speakers rocking fast. Very easy setup and configuration. Big thunderous bass and definitely a difference over my Pioneer Elite VSX-52tx. Even my Polk subwoofer is happier now. Setting it up properly is really important to get good sound. Plenty of power for my Polk surround speakers. Tons of HDMI inputs. Just remember you can't go from HDMI to Component out to TV. If you get the Apple TV with only HDMI output you will need an HDMI input on the TV. This receiver and most HD receivers only upscale, they don't go down. In other words if you have any peripherals connected by HDMI to this receiver, you cannot output through Component to your monitor. You need an HDMI input on the monitor.
Remote needs to be replaced by a universal professional remote like the Harmony. Internet connection is not a big deal and only adds about 20 internet radio stations and iPhone connectivity for an app that really isn't that full featured anyways. I wouldn't look at ethernet connectivity as a big deal here. Bluetooth adapter is great though for streaming iphone songs and radio players like Pandora and AOL radio. Iphone connection on the front wasn't that big of a deal to me neither since it only plays from iTunes library and the album art is not impressive. Get Apple TV if you want impressive artwork from your iTunes library. I prefer the wireless bluetooth for iPhone streaming. I can go from my car to the house and it picks up right where the song left off.
Flimsy plastic cover on the front is cheap. Really not needed though. Looks fine without it.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, detailed sound, great value, Home Theater magazine "TOP PICK", January 24, 2011
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This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I have recently tried a Marantz NR1601, Yamaha HTR5063 and Denon AVR-1911. The Denon and Marantz made a VERY LOUD popping noise(the first time I thought my new speakers blew up), when time shifting a recordeded tv show (skipping commercials) from my Windows 7 based HTPC (google "WMC7 speaker popping" and check the thread on thegreenbutton.com) Yamaha and Pioneer do not have the issue (Marantz and Denon sounded good, but Yamaha did not sound good). That brought me to the Pioneer (but thinking about it now, I should have tried the Pioneer first), and I want others to learn, without going through all the trouble that I had to go through.

Note that the Pioneer VSX-1120-k has the exact same specifications (including weight) as the Pioneer Elite VSX-32. Only difference is the Elite has a 12v trigger (that I do not need), 2 less HDMI inputs and maybe a slightly different remote, and cosmetic differences (and of course, the Elite costs more). The Pioneer VSX-1120-k is an excellent value at its current sale price at ~$500 price point (The Elite is currently ~$800 at Best Buy Magnolia). Sound wise, the Pioneer VSX-1120-k should sound exactly the same as Pioneer Elite VSX-32 (as well as the Pioneer Elite VSX-33, which has more features, and costs ~$1000 at Best Buy Magnolia). Please check the specifications for yourself on the product sheet, owner's manual and side by side comparison on Pioneer's website.

Pioneer VSX-1120-k Pros (that matter to me):
Excellent, detailed, clear sound (music and home theater use), with plenty of power (you may hear some people say that Pioneer tends to sound a bit bright - I have read that those complaints were for models from several years ago, and Pioneer has come a long way since then). I feel this Pioneer's sound is a bit more natural, and NOTICEABALY MORE detailed than the Denon and Marantz (and of course, Yamaha). Also, it has excellent stereo imaging.
Quote from Pioneer tech support rep's email, regarding 1120 vs 1020:
"Personally, I like the 1120 better for sound and features. Even though you may not use the power, it will sound cleaner. Like having a V8 engine instead of a V6. Both go fast, but the V8 strains less and sounds better." (good analogy, in my opinion)

Continuous power output of 110 watts per channel (20Hz to 20KHz, 0.08% THD, 8 Ohms).(1020-k has less)
150W per channel (1KHz, 1% THD, 6 Ohms) - my speakers (Monitor Audio RX6) have 6 ohms, impedance; while 1%THD may sound high, keep in mind that it is @ 150 watts(probably still 0.08% @ 110 Watts, 6 ohms). Moreover, Marantz SR-5005 (and other models) are rated at 10% THD ! (1Khz, 6 ohms) on their spec sheet, at max power. 1020-k does not have specs(THD) for 6 ohms on their spec sheet or owner's manual.

THX Select2 Plus certified(VSX-1020-k is not; all Elites above VSX-31 are THX certified)
Quiote from owner's manual : "THX Select2 Plus requirements cover every aspect of the product including pre-amplifier and power amplifier performance and operation, and hundreds of other parameters in both the digital and analog domain."

Burr Brown DAC (VSX-1020-k has Wolfson; all Elites above VSX-31 have Burr Brown); This DAC can process up to 192 KHz/24 bit audio.

Pre-amp outs (I do not use this) - will be useful if you intend to connect an external amplifier for some reason.

Bi-amp possible (most receivers at or above the $500 price point can, but check) - supposed to improve sound quality (I do it and like it).
Quote from Monitor Audio's tech support rep's email :
"Bi-amping will improve the sound yes. It will open it up more and make it a much cleaner sound. Similarly with bi-wiring."

Advanced Direct Energy Amplifier (1020 has "direct energy" amplifier)
Quote from Pioneer's website:
"Pioneer's own Advanced Direct Energy amplifier design and Power Train construction concentrates all amplifier channels to minimize the amp's "power loop". This efficient design reduces noise interference from other circuits to further increase fidelity to the input source. Less interference means clearer sound and increased accuracy."

Can turn off TV (connected via HDMI) and continue to listen to music from PC (via HDMI).

Nice separate section in remote for important TV controls (also programmable remote).

Remote back light.

Dimmer - 4 levels of dimming for reciiever's display/power light (last level is almost fully off).

Room correction - Pioneer's "Advanced" MCACC seems do do a good job (speaker distance, speaker level, standing wave, reverb, equalizer, professional equalizer and more). Best part is, if you want, you can fine tune all of the above and more with the "manual" mode(But there is also a "fully auto" mode, where you do not have to do anything). For instance, there is are 6 memory presets, and I can disable/tune the equalizer, standing wave, speaker distance, speaker level on 1 preset to my taste (and it is easy to change the presets on the fly, without interrupting what you are watching or listening to)

The following were not a big deal for me, but some may find it useful:
Internet radio (nice if you do not have a PC / music streamer connected to it)
Can pass though video (via HDMI) from my PC to TV, even if the receiver is off (standby).
HDMI switching - automatically switches inputs depending on which device is sending a signal (works pretty neat)
Marvell video scaler (all Elites above VSX-31 have a Marvell video scaler)
USB port (if you want to connect a USB flash drive / hard drive with high quality MP3)

Tip:
For Internet radio URLs, on your PC's web browser, go to shoutcast.com, go to "Settings" and choose "Play SHOUTcast stations in default media player ( eg: Winamp / iTunes / Windows Media Player )"

Play a radio station on the website, open the downloaded.pls file in foobar 2000 (or whatever media player), check for the "properties" of the file when playing it, and "copy" the URL of the "file path"

Open the 1120-k's "Internet Radio Settings) on your web browser and "paste" the URL and click "Update"

Enjoy!

Update - I have been using this receiver for a few weeks now (019Mar11). I love it and appreciate it more (worth every dollar). You will not be disappointed with the sound quality! Highly recommended!

Home Theater Magazine gave it 5 stars (max) for Performance, Ergonomics and Value, and 4.5 stars for Features. They also named it a "TOP PICK".
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High-End Receiver Features at Half the Price, September 19, 2010
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This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I was looking to upgrade my 2-year old Pioneer Elite receiver and checking out the specs that would have cost me $1000. Then I looked at the regular Pioneer line and found that I could get most of the same features for about 1/2 of the price with the Pioneer VSX-1120-K! Yes, I know the Elite model has slightly better specs and a better power supply--but at twice the cost???

Others have commented on the great features of this receiver (Internet radio, iPhone support, MCACC, Marvell video processing, lighted remote, 6 HDMI ports, etc.) But the amazing thing is that you can get all these features for not more than a standard receiver.

Installation was simple--connect your speakers and your peripherals and then use the microphone included setup and follow the GUI instructions.

Did I mention that the VSX-1120-K has great sound? The rated 120 w/channel provided booming sound in my room.

The other bonus is that this receiver offers HDMI 1.4 support in case you want to upgrade to 3-D TV. Although this feature is not really that important in and of itself, it shows how Pioneer wants to be on top of the technology curve.

Only down side is that the remote is not ergonomic and has about 50 small buttons that are hard to figure out in the dark. But the lighted remote fixes some of this.

Check out the Pioneer VSX-1120-K for yourself. On top of the basics, you'll find that it has more options that you can imagine. Pioneer is truly giving you a lot of receiver for a modest amount of cash.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great sound and video but restricted PassThrough ??, December 16, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I started with the Onkyo 508. Failed HDMI in first month and poor Onkyo Service had the unit for over 1 month with no part to fix it. Luckily Amazon backed me up and gave me a refund even after my 30 days was up. Next I tried the Denon 1611. Excellent sound but constant HDMI dropouts so you could not really enjoy it. Finally the Pioneer 1120 !! Ease of setup is as good if not better. The phase detection of speakers does not work so I just moved ahead in the setup process. Speakers were adjusted nicely as well as the Sub. The Denon put the SUB level up way to high.

I have had half a day to play with the 1120 and so far no issues. Sound quality is superb ! I place it on top of the list of the three with the Denon 2nd and the Onkyo last. In all honesty the sound quality of the Denon and the Pioneer are close and well above the Onkyo. Either would be a better choice over the Onkyo as long as you do not have the HDMI problems I had with the Denon. This could have just been a handshake issue with the Denon and my Samsung 61".

The OSD of the Pioneer is between that of the Denon and Onkyo. I think the Onkyo seemed to be the most attractive and well organized. The Pioneer is organized but appearance is not that good. The Denon just looked like poop.

The Pioneer is definitely the most feature rich of the three and so far all the features seem to work. The Ipod Interface gives you control via the remote with OSD and album art. Personally my PC is integrated via HDMI into the Pioneer so I will always just control iTunes via my iPhone as it plays through the Pioneer as the visualizer plays on the 61". The iPod interface on the Pioneer will be a welcome feature to some its just not something I will use over what I already have going.

Video quality seems excellent. Since I cannot compare side by side with the other units I have tried, I can only say I have no complaints with the quality. I cannot rightfully say its better without a side by side.

Heat seems to be lower than the other two units. The Onkyo was no doubt the hottest. You could heat your house with it. The Denon is just slightly hotter than the Pioneer. Thats my initial impression at least.

The iPhone APP for controlling this unit is nice. Much easier than using the supplied remote for sure. Setup of this feature was as simple as plugging the ethernet cable into my router and then into the AVR. The application found the unit right away and so far all the features I have used worked without issue. Its like having a custom color touchscreen remote and thats just cool :)

The internet radio is nice. Using the PC control, which also worked great, you can enter custom URL's for internet radio stations. The interface itself, as mentioned before, is not that attractive but better than Denon.

I cannot say much more about it. At this point I strongly recommend this unit over the Onkyo 508 and the Denon 1611.

If your considering this unit over the other two mentioned.. do not hesitate and get it. Yes it costs $100 more than the Denon and $250 more than the Onkyo. The appearance of the unit, connectivity, sound quality and features are well worth the difference in price.

CON >>>
PassThrough not fully operational. Apparently Pioneer deemed it necessary to change the passthrough works, requiring the HDMI components to be CEC enabled in order to take advantage of Passthrough. This means that if your device is not CEC enabled and you want to watch something without turning on the AVR, it will not work. The Denon and Onkyo amps I have tried both allowed passthrough of components the Pioneer will not.

Originally I rated the system 4 stars, thinking the passthrough issue would not bother me much but it does. I have lowered my rating to 3 stars and unfortunately it seems my hunt will continue. Im going to return the 1120 and try again. Maybe the 4th AVR will be the one.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great sound & video, August 25, 2010
This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
It's been about 4 weeks since purchasing and setting up my vsx-1120-k. The sound is clean, clear, and it just looks plain sexy. I chose the 1120 over the 1020 simply because it is the newest of the vsx line, and I was excited about the new PC control features. However, it turns out that the PC control is not all that helpful, except for programming internet radio presets. You cannot adjust speaker settings or advanced system setup parameters through the PC web interface - you can only adjust internet radio and switch inputs. This was disappointing, but at the same time the on-screen menus and settings interface direct to the TV are straight forward and simple to use. Network setup and input setup was a breeze. The longest part was re-adjusting the MCACC (automatic setup) parameters to best fit my room space, but once dialed in, everything I push to it sounds amazing at ANY volume! I still have yet to attempt customizing the vsx remote to control other devices as well, such as STB, TV, etc. I also can't comment on any iPhone functions as I do not own one (nor plan too).

Pros: Powerful, clean sound (no hum or hiss AT ALL!), HDMI switching works very well (much more reliable than my Sony Bravia's internal switching), Upconversion is great, expandable to '9.1' setup, and of course appearance. Nice to know the 3D capability is there.

Cons: Lack of advanced setup functions in PC control, Large size/dimensions - had to cut out and modify back of entertainment center to make it fit properly after all connections were made

Initial Setup: VSX-1120-K, Klipsch QuintetIV speakers (5.1), Klipsch 350W sub, class 6 power conditioner, 12g wiring w/banana plugs into receiver, 1.4 HDMI & optical cabling, Belkin PF60 power conditioner
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great audio, tons of connection options, horrible remote, November 26, 2010
This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
Bought this to replace an aging Sony receiver that finally died.

Features that made this unit stand out for me were: 1) Internet radio (horrible reception where we live); 2) Wealth of input options and customization of inputs; and 3) iPod/iPhone connectivity built-in.

Added the receiver to my Harmony setup w/out issue, works perfectly well with my Harmony 700 remote.

Sound quality is excellent...this receiver seems to have woken up my RBH speakers.

Good stuff:

- The automated speaker setup process is relatively easy to do, and the results exceeded my expectations. (I have a 5.1 RBH speaker setup.) One really nice feature was that the automated setup identified two of my speakers that were out of phase - a quick swap of the banana plugs on the receiver and all was well.
- ipod/iPhone feature works well (haven't tried the iPhone app)
- On-screen GUI is pretty straightforward, and provides a really nice option to rename inputs/settings, etc., using a USB keyboard
- As noted, the sound is great - really impressed w/the audio processing .
- Video processing (I'm upscaling to 1080p) is good, not earth shattering, but unless you're a videophile/geek you'll be very happy
- Internet radio is very, very useful for me due to poor reception, and works very well when it works. (See "Bad stuff" for more on this.) You can access an EWS on the device via it's IP to edit your stations (again, using a USB keyboard is fastest) which makes it simple to customize.
- The only thing this lacks in terms of inputs is S-Video, but I haven't had an S-Video device in years, so good call on Pioneer's part.
- Built-in (i.e., at no additional cost) iPod/iPhone support is great. Other amps have add-on docs that can cost $100. The connector passes audio and video, you can browse audio/video content on your device from your seat w/the remote, and it charges the device while connected.

Bad stuff:
- Internet radio is off and on. Sometimes works great, other times doesn't work, gives me a connection error message. Haven't found a pattern yet. (Every other device in the same network connects w/out issues.)
- Seems like a couple of inputs are not accessible directly via a button on remote - In particular Video and TV/Sat analog inputs can only be accessed by cycling through the inputs one-by-one. Makes it impossible to use those inputs w/a remote like the Harmony where each setting requires direct access...scrolling through input lists is so 1990. I just moved my analog device (old VCR) from the Video input to the CD input.
- Remote sucks eggs...do not buy this assuming you will want to use its remote. I mean it is a real piece of confusing, tiny-button laden, poorly laid-out junk. Get a Harmony 700 or similar and you'll be good.
- I'm getting occasional HDCP error messages on my TV when I change between activities (e.g., when I go from watching TV to viewing a DVD). I haven't seen a clear pattern when they occur, and I simply clear the error message and things all work fine, and all HDMI input display fine, but it's a minor annoyance.

Get a set of banana plugs for use with this receiver to connect your speakers, much more convenient to simply plug them in than trying to wire to the receiver terminals directly.

Overall I'm quite happy so far w/my purchase, and would recommend this receiver.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'Almost' perfect...., March 7, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Pioneer VSX-1120-K 7.1 Home Theater Receiver (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
In the last 3 months I went from a Denon 3310, to a Pioneer 1120K to an Onkyo 808....so other than a sole product review I'm also going to be doing a little comparative review with my replacement the Onkyo 808.

For starters, I paid $530 for the Pioneer 1120K and $680 for the Onkyo TX-NR808. It's unfair to compare two products from different price range..but if you're like whose budget ranges from $500-$700 then this review is for you.

First of all, Pioneer 1120K is a fantastic receiver and is one of the best receivers you can get for around $500~.
But...
-I miss the volume OSD (not found on 1120K)...a few times my kids would turn up the volume during a quiet scene without realizing that they've set the volume at near deafening decibels. I want one that has a volume on-screen display.
-I also had one issue when pairing the Pioneer 1120K and a Samsung PN58C8000 to the 'Watch TV' activity on the Harmony One remote. Basically if you have an activity called 'Watch TV' on the Harmony One (as do everyone who owns that remote)...and you switch the TV on without switching the receiver on (sometimes that happens because of poor IR signal or if your receiver is inside a wooden cabinet like mine)....the receiver will NOT switch on till you turn your TV off and re-initialize that activity. I thought it was an issue with the remote but I couldn't replicate this problem on the Denon 3311 and Onkyo 808. It still could be random case of a faulty 1120K but I tried calling Logitech/Pioneer with no avail. One of the reasons I'm sending it back...

-Someone said the ALC on Pioneer is similar to Audyssey's Dynamic Volume/EQ - I don't fully agree.
I used the ALC on the 1120K...and though it 'might be similar' to Dynamic Volume on the Onkyo but it doesn't work anywhere as effective as DV found on the Onkyo/Denon.
My biggest gripe with ALC is that it is ineffective across the board when used with a multitude of audio sources and when it works with..it's coin flip in terms of performance. It's not consistent and half of the commercials I notice are still loud. The only real comparison to Audyssey's Dynamic Volume/EQ is the 'Midnight' function on the Pioneer which partially cuts everything but dialogue...but then again not what I'm looking for. I'm looking for my commercials to be at the same volume as the movie...which is precisely what I experience when I started using this Audyssey feature on my Onkyo 808.

-The MCACC on the 1120K doesn't equalize the subwoofer as good as Audyssey on 808 (it's my opinion from using both)...yes you can manually equalize the MCACC calibrated settings on the 1120k which is cool but I'm not good at that. I prefer just getting it Auto-calibrated and never having to touch it again (guess cause I'm a noob and no audiophile). If you're good at equalizing audio components this would be a non-issue but I'm not.

-People say 1120K has better upscaling than Onkyo....please don't jump on this bandwagon without actually figuring out what you want in your HT system. I find this like comparing 2 samples of some bad stuff through a microscope....upscaling SD to HD on both receivers looks just as crappy. Unless you're adamant in getting the best picture quality out of SD source then I guess you might theoretically lean towards the Pioneer. Otherwise the performance is negligible and most of you won't even notice the difference before your eyes bleed. After a comparative check, I found the Pioneer detailing out all the Picture Quality flaws in an SD picture much more than the Onkyo (which softens it out). Honestly I prefer the softened PQ rather than have to watch horribly sharp bad images. This gets noticeably pronounced when you sit within 6 feet next to a large TV (like me and my 58") but this was one of the primary reasons I initially went for the 1120k. I guess I was thoroughly disappointed because of the hype/unanimous vote for the Marvell processor and I over-expected it work miracles. Silly me. I learnt one thing though from all of this- I will never consider an quality of an upscaler to be one of the primary reasons in choosing an a/v receiver anymore because my goal for an home theater investment is to enjoy true unadulterated HD movies/3D games on my TV than have to worry about the performance comparisons between two processors that both equally fail on upscaling SD to HD.
But that's just me..

-The 1120K DOES NOT have an S-Video input...huge deal breaker for me because now I have two prehistoric laptops that are totally useless to me now. They were previously used to stream regional Asian (non-HD) movies for my family while I sneak away to play CS on the newer computer ...now that purpose is obsolete.

-The 1120K DOES NOT have HDMI passthrough if this matters to you...unless it's some CEC enabled device (this is already mentioned in earlier user comments found in this product review)

-The 1120 is cooler than most a/v receivers I've ever used. A positive point for overwhelmingly warm homes.

-The 1120 has a sleek look but the front panel is all plastic. Some might find it cheap but it didn't bother me one bit though.

-The 1120 has a dialogue enhancement feature for the center channel which is actually cool.

-The 1120 doesn't have a 12V trigger. This is really helpful in regards to power management if you have an external amp. Otherwise, if you're into wire porn...you could add another smart strip for your external amp as an alternate solution.

-The 1120 has 6 HDMI inputs (front/rear) whereas the Onkyo 808 has 7....I'm finding myself running out of HDMI inputs so this is an area where I find that 'more is good'.

-Power rating: I have a 2-speaker setup (6 Ohms) for now but from what I understand the 1120K is a powerful receiver. At certain setups (like the 7.2 setup) it is even more powerful than the Onkyo 808 as most people mistakely think.

A lot of people comparing Watts on Pioneer and to much powerful a/v receivers like the Onkyo 808 without looking at the "all channels driven" rating.

Pioneer 1120K specs mentions that it has 120W@8 Ohms (7 channels driven)
Onkyo 808 specs mention that it does 135W@8 Ohms (but with only 2 channels driven)

But in a 5 and 7 speaker setup lab test (from hometheather.com) we can see how the Pioneer is actually better than the Onkyo 808 in a 7 channel setup:

Onkyo 807 (Last Year's model but has the same power rating as the 808)
5 channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 105.5 watts
1% distortion at 122.0 watts

Pioneer 1120K
5 channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 47.0 watts
1% distortion at 52.3 watts

Onkyo 807
7 channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 29.9 watts
1% distortion at 33.0 watts

Pioneer 1120K
7 channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 38.9 watts
1% distortion at 47.1 watts

The reason Onkyo receivers are underpowered past 5 channels is that they have a limiter circuit that kicks in when you push more than 5 channels. Into 7 channels, the Pioneer 1120 and Onkyo 808 are pretty similar (at times the 1120 being more powerful), but into 2 or 5 channels, the 808 easily trumps the 1120.

So those with 7 speaker setup and who want to stay within the $500~ mark...just get Pioneer 1120k. There is nothing else better at that price range!
For those willing to get the benefits of Audyssey with a little bit more power- get the Onkyo TX-NR808. Bost of these are the best in the class in technicality points (just my opinion) at that price range.
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