Pipe Dream 2002 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(13) IMDb 6.2/10
Available on Prime
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A plumber (Martin Donovan) pretends to be a film director to get himself noticed by one of the hottest actresses in New York (Rebecca Gayheart). His Screenwriter friend (Mary-Louise Parker) builds on his scam to get her movie made.

Starring:
Martin Donovan, Anthony Arkin
Runtime:
1 hour 34 minutes

Pipe Dream

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Pipe Dream

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Product Details

Genres Romance, Comedy
Director John Walsh
Starring Martin Donovan, Anthony Arkin
Supporting actors Marla Sucharetza, Mary-Louise Parker, Kevin Carroll, Kevin Sussman, Natalie B. Pyper, Joel Horwitz, Kelley Harron, Spencer Kayden, Michaela Conlin, Jonathan M. Woodward, Guinevere Turner, Peter Jacobson, Cynthia Kaplan, Jack Merrill, Laura Cahill, Kevin Seal, Rebecca Gayheart, Tim Hopper
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Cute little comedy.
Hank
The film clocks in just over 90 minutes and it doesn't feel either rushed or dragged out.
Daniel Friedman
Donovan, Carroll and Parker give inspired and very funny performances.
Bruce A. Nelson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dr Lawrence Hauser on September 15, 2003
Format: DVD
Having never heard of it, I purchased a cable television viewing of Pipe Dream in the hope that its splendid cast would generate sufficient friction to hold my interest for an hour and one-half on a quiet Sunday evening. I was particularly intrigued at the prospect of watching Martin Donovan and Mary-Louise Parker, two exceptionally talented actors, work together in the context of a romantic comedy. I am happy to report that not only was I completely engrossed by this delightful ensemble piece, I had that all too rare experience of wishing it would never end! The story starts off a bit slowly as we encounter David K. (Donovan) toiling away unglamorously as a lowly plumber in New York City. Although he is obviously a well-trained and highly skilled tradesman, he feels under-appreciated as a man since woman seem to disregard him automatically given his workaday status and frequently soiled appearance. In fact, many of his clients hardly even look at him having prejudged his value solely on their preconception of the type of person who does such work. This is poignantly, and painfully, brought home one evening by his attractive neighbor Antonia (Parker) after they sleep together on the basis of both having had a good deal too much to drink. David overhears Antonia on the phone in the morning admonishing a girlfriend not to take the liaison seriously as even though the sex was great the man, after all, is only a plumber. How to elevate his status sufficiently to be regarded as a contender by desirable woman drives David into a flight of imagination that informs the narrative structure of the remainder of this very cleverly written tale of identity transformation.Read more ›
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Bruce A. Nelson on August 24, 2003
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There's a large majority in the world, at least in the Western Hemisphere that lives by the canon of "Perception is Everything". They prescribe and are overly dependant that immediate perception is the only mode that human beings acquire all information to process, interpret, judge and hence, "understand" and "see" others in the world. In other words, perception equals "reality". If one sees a banker, a car mechanic and a teacher, an immediate profile (or at the very least, a level of respectability and even desirability) can be assessed on each. Without delving (thankfully) in the complexities of Jungian theory, this low budget independent film by John Walsh explores with satire and insight, how widespread, yet fragile and ultimately false this belief is. There is a lot more than meets the eye and much humor in this human frailty.
The premise of the film is that of a plumber, David Kulovic (Martin Donovan) who cannot seem to score more than a one-nighter because "he's just a plumber". With the assistance of a casting director (Kevin Carroll), who's in search of the ultimate shower/water pressure experience and a would-be screenwriter, (Mary-Louise Parker) he concocts a rather remarkable scheme of meeting beautiful women by posing as a film director (who happens to be "hot" in Holland).
What prevents this over the top idea from turning into a Sandra Bullock afternoon waster is the excellent writing of Walsh and Cynthia Kaplan. It's an intelligent approach and a return to the dry humor found in the great romantic comedies of Hollywood's heyday. If you are looking for "American Pie", then stay away. Short attention spans will miss a lot of great one-liners. Donovan, Carroll and Parker give inspired and very funny performances.
Read more ›
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Friedman on March 30, 2004
Format: DVD
Pipe Dream is yet another in the endless genre of films about making films but it's slightly different in that the bombast of moviemaking is downplayed and the relationships between the characters is highlighted. The basic plot is that of a plumber who masquerades as a film director in order to meet women, and in doing so finds himself in a position to direct an actual film. It's got a cute feel to it, mainly because Martin Donovan as the plumber as this mild goofball charm and Mary-Louise Parker, who is usually good in everything she does, brings her usual wry sense of humor to her role as the writer and real brains behind the project. Rebecca Gayheart is mostly eye candy but she does have some very funny scenes as an actress who may be in over her head.
It's a romantic comedy that teeters on sappiness but it never quite falls into that abyss, mostly because Donovan and Parker have a definite chemistry that elevates their characters into a realm where you genuinely care about them and feel for them. There's also very little in the way of extemporaneous scenes and dialogue that get in the way of the plot. While it is somewhat predictable, it doesn't feel like a cliche. There are some moments that are genuinely very funny but it's not that type of comedy. There are a couple of sequences that try to deal with a larger theme of place in society and stereotypes but fortunately these don't linger.
The film clocks in just over 90 minutes and it doesn't feel either rushed or dragged out. Overall, this was a nice little movie.
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