The Piper At The Gates of Dawn [40th Anniversary Complete Edition]

September 11, 2007 | Format: MP3

$14.49
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:17
30
2
3:09
30
3
3:05
30
4
2:46
30
5
4:24
30
6
3:07
30
7
9:41
30
8
2:14
30
9
3:53
30
10
2:10
30
11
3:27
Disc 2
30
1
4:14
30
2
3:07
30
3
3:08
30
4
2:46
30
5
4:26
30
6
3:05
30
7
9:40
30
8
2:13
30
9
3:42
30
10
2:11
30
11
3:24
Disc 3
30
1
2:57
30
2
2:45
30
3
2:54
30
4
3:05
30
5
3:45
30
6
5:15
30
7
3:11
30
8
3:09
30
9
5:03


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 11, 2007
  • Release Date: August 31, 2007
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Label: Parlophone UK
  • Copyright: 2007 Pink Floyd Music Ltd under exclusive licence to Parlophone Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2007 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:56:13
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000VSQ0ZA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (97 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,683 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Discs One and Two are Mono and Stereo versions of the album in its entirety.
Elliot Knapp
Second reason-even though the album is 40 years old, it is still very original, no one ever made anything like this still-a very unique thing!
ManWithGoodTasteSays:
As such, it's a truly alternate mix/vision of the album that reveals alot of different sounds.
silly narwhal

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

132 of 139 people found the following review helpful By Elliot Knapp on September 10, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Before Pink Floyd became (deservedly) famous in the mid-70's for Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, and later for The Wall, they were a different band--they were Syd Barrett's band. Instead of the epic, moody, atmospheric, trippy rock forged primarily by the synergy of Roger Waters and David Gilmour later on in Pink Floyd's existence, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn finds the band making music that is very much of its time (1967). The music that became known as "psychedelic" is loosely defined as music that combines creative sonic textures and surprising sounds with bizarre, often whimsical lyrics to either simulate or enhance a drug experience. With the Beatles just down the hall in Abbey Road Studios recording Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, The Pink Floyd (named after obscure American bluesmen Pink Anderson and Floyd Council) were on the cutting edge of the British psychedelic scene while recording The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. Now, 40 years later, we're offered a worthy definitive edition of a classic band's classic debut that still endures today as a classic of its genre, thanks to Syd Barrett's unique vision and inimitable songwriting.

What is offered in this 3-CD set? Discs One and Two are Mono and Stereo versions of the album in its entirety. Many fans are passionately divided as to which version is better: younger fans are most likely accustomed to hearing music in stereo, so a mono mix may seem antiquated. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn's stereo mix is pretty awesome--I find it a very well-thought-out stereo mix (some from this era weren't particularly well-done), and some great panning effects happen (especially in "Lucifer Sam" and the finale of "Interstellar Overdrive") that really add to the music's psychedelic impact.
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86 of 98 people found the following review helpful By Michael Malcolm on September 5, 2007
Format: Audio CD
The first track on the 1967 American release of "Piper at the Gates of Dawn" [Tower ST 5093] is the Syd Barrett gem, "See Emily Play." This is arguably the best song the Floyd ever recorded, but in England it was originally released only as a single. Since this new 2 cd re-release of Piper is the English album, "Emily" is not included. Floyd lovers may prefer to purchase the 3 cd set, "LIMITED EDITION - EXTRA TRACKS" scheduled for 9/11/07 release which includes "Emily" along with other singles from the period.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Roger Page Lennon on September 11, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Piper At The Gates Of Dawn is one of my favorite albums, and personally I've always found it to be Pink Floyd's best album(and if any discography is jammed with classic albums it's the mighty Floyd's). Every song featured is a psychedelic gem/masterpiece that pushed the envelope of what was possible at the time. Syd Barrett knew how to write song's that were experimental, but also extremely interesting and to be truthful accessible.

That's just a brief review of the album, believe me I could go on for hours on Piper, its just that great. However the purpose of this review is to go over the particulars of the 40th anniversary edition. Overall it's fantastic. There are two major incentives for true fans that already own the album, and don't want to buy it just for the new packaging. First off the mono mix of Piper(disc one of this set) completely blows the stereo mix out of the water. After listening to the mono mix I can confidently say I will not be listening to the stereo mix all to often. The mono mix was supposedly mixed by Barrett himself, and offers a slightly more psychedelic mix than the stereo mix most are accustomed too. Effects that cant be heard in the stereo mix jump out. The vocals have a much more cosmic sound to them, and the instruments just leap out of the mix in a kaleidoscopic swirl of sound. However there are some interesting qualities in the stereo mix(Disc 2), that make it worthwhile as well. While the mix doesn't leap out like the mono does, the stereo mix offers interest for those with headphones, as instruments move in and out of the left and right channels creating interesting panning effects. Overall I prefer the mono mix but the stereo mix deserves a listen now and then, to decipher its own different sonic textures.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lozarithm on April 16, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Whilst today stereo is the norm, in 1967 it was a small minority market and much more time was lavished on the monaural version than on the stereo mix, which would be done in a day or two, after the mono master had been completed, and was often not released until after the standard mono version. Consequently, there were often significant differences between the two. I can remember spending far too many teenage hours comparing mono and stereo versions of albums by the Beatles, the Pink Floyd and others on headphones using a customized mono record player with a stereo cartridge wired to a second amplifier. To me, a psychedelic record such as Piper cried out for stereo effects, and thanks to the crisp production of the late Norman Smith and the sound engineering of Peter Bown at Abbey Road, I was not disappointed.

It was an exciting time at Abbey Road, too, as the Beatles were ensconced at the same time in another studio working on Sergeant Pepper, and met the Floyd while they were working on Pow R Toc H. The Pretty Things also started work on SF Sorrow there, again with Norman Smith (who also engineered Sergeant Pepper), before the Floyd's sessions were complete.

Piper was the only album that Syd Barrett made in full with the Floyd. He wrote eight of the nine songs and contributed his unique space guitar flourishes to Interstellar Overdrive and the noodly Pow R Toc H. Piper At The Gates Of Dawn is really a benchmark album of the genre now known as psyche. Roger Waters may now dismiss it as juvenilia, but I still listen to it more often than is probably healthy.

The stereo version has been newly remastered for this edition, and sounds superb.
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