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Pirates and the Lost Templar Fleet: The Secret Naval War Between the Templars & the Vatican Paperback – September 1, 2003


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Pirates and the Lost Templar Fleet: The Secret Naval War Between the Templars & the Vatican + The Lost Colony of the Templars: Verrazano's Secret Mission to America + The Templar Meridians: The Secret Mapping of the New World
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 277 pages
  • Publisher: Adventures Unlimited Press (September 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931882185
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931882187
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #236,016 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Even first skimming it there didn't discourage my purchase.
Robert E. Branca
I think that the author could have added even more, to make things even more well rounded, but there is nothing that I can do about that. :)
Karlie Laumer
Most of these factual errors have no direct bearing on the conspiracy theories advocated by the writer.
Ashtar Command

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By TemplarMason on July 27, 2004
Format: Paperback
I came to this book thinking that I would find some link between the Knights Templar and Pirates, but boy was I looking in the wrong place. The author had maybe 20 pages of new stuff and the rest of the book was a rehash on every other Templar Treasure book out there. And then just to piss you off, he never gives you any evidence that the Templars were in fact the Pirates. Do yourself a favor and go read the 20 pages about the pirates in a bookstore and save some cash.
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29 of 34 people found the following review helpful By J. Hamlin on September 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is typical of Childress' books--mildly entertaining, but ultimately vaccuous. Chldress gives credence to every half-baked rumor and legend while failing to provide any level of decent support for his basic premise. If you're soldiered through his some of his other books you'll find material virtually rehashed word for word. If you like a collage of hodge podge stories and fabrications, you'll have fun enough but don't expect much in the way of substance.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Ashtar Command on October 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
David Hatcher Childress is a prolific writer of books on alternative history and conspiracy theory. However, neither friend nor foe will like this one. People like myself who don't find conspiracy theory convincing, will reject it for that reason. But even those who believe will be disappointed. "Pirates and the Lost Templar Fleet" contains nothing new. It's essentialy a rehash of ideas taken from other and more well-written books. In a sense, this book by Childress is "pirated".

My main problem with it, however, is not so much the conspiracy theories themselves. Obviously, a conspiracist writer believes in conspiracies. That goes with the territory. My main problem is that the book also contain many purely factual errors.

For instance, Childress writes that the Seljuk Turks ruled their empire from Constantinople-Istanbul around the year 1090. Come again? In reality, the Seljuk Turks never conquered Constantinople. That was accomplished by the Ottoman Turks, but only in 1453! "Around the year 1090", Constantinople was still the capital of the Byzantine Empire, which was neither Muslim nor Turk. This is not a minor error. Indeed, it's common knowledge that Constantinople fell to the Muslims in 1453. At least it should be to writers of medieval history.

Childress further claims that the Templars set up the Kingdom of Jerusalem. But the Templars didn't even exist during the First Crusade! He writes that the Normans who conquered Sicily before the crusades were Templars. Once again: there were no Templars at that time.

Most of these factual errors have no direct bearing on the conspiracy theories advocated by the writer. But some do. Childress wonders why the Templars were founded at all.
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31 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on February 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
Pirates & The Lost Templar Fleet: The Secret Naval War Between The Knights Templar & The Vatican by David Hatcher Childress is an informed and informative study, an impressive history which opens new interpretations and possibilities between the lines of the official records. When the Templars were disbanded by papal order in 1307, their great fleet disappeared from its base at La Rochelle. What happened to these ships and their treasures? Pirates & The Lost Templar Fleet explores a number of fascinating possible theories, including the hypothesis that some Templars reached Canada 100 years before Columbus -- who perhaps had Templar maps in his possession when he set sail. Black-and-white illustrations embellish this amazing and iconoclastic study and theoretical reconstruction of the unknown. Also very highly recommended are three other thematically related titles from Adventures Unlimited Press: The History Of The Knights Templar; The Tamplars' Legacy In Montreal, The New Jerusalem; and Nostradamus And The Lost Templar Legacy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert E. Branca on March 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
I'm halfway through and skimmed the rest. Sorry I didn't read these reviews before buying it on impulse when browsing at a bookstore. Even first skimming it there didn't discourage my purchase.

The book is interesting. But it's hardly a book about pirates. It's full of casual references to the Knights Templar, almost always reiterating that they were disbanded and at odds with the vatican. It's hardly about war.......between anybody. It's hardly more than a skeletal history of the Knights Templar.

Some of the bibliography, references and footnotes (so to speak) refer to the author's own books and others by the same publisher. The resulting illusion is that the references are all factual, true or from learned sources.

The book is cleverly marketed with front and back graphics extolling its contents. Although interesting and thought provoking, speculative questions are raised with the promise of finding out in the fascinating pages inside. That promise is not fulfilled. The questions are raised again and again with very loose threads as convenient premises supposedly leading to logical or proven conclusions.

At best, the book introduces the worldwide exposure and interests of the Knights Templar and continually raises the questions of what happened to their treasures, secrets, personnel and fleet upon disbanding. Most interesting is the speculation about ancient maps and their wonderous detail and sources.

Look, for a modest price it was interesting and thought provoking, but not informative about Pirates, the Vatican, secret wars or United States history as tied to the Templars, Freemasonry or other secret societies.
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