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Pirates and the Lost Templar Fleet Paperback – February 25, 2015

3 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 100 pages
  • Publisher: Adventures Unlimited Press (February 25, 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931882185
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931882187
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #718,223 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I came to this book thinking that I would find some link between the Knights Templar and Pirates, but boy was I looking in the wrong place. The author had maybe 20 pages of new stuff and the rest of the book was a rehash on every other Templar Treasure book out there. And then just to piss you off, he never gives you any evidence that the Templars were in fact the Pirates. Do yourself a favor and go read the 20 pages about the pirates in a bookstore and save some cash.
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Format: Paperback
David Hatcher Childress is a prolific writer of books on alternative history and conspiracy theory. However, neither friend nor foe will like this one. People like myself who don't find conspiracy theory convincing, will reject it for that reason. But even those who believe will be disappointed. "Pirates and the Lost Templar Fleet" contains nothing new. It's essentialy a rehash of ideas taken from other and more well-written books. In a sense, this book by Childress is "pirated".

My main problem with it, however, is not so much the conspiracy theories themselves. Obviously, a conspiracist writer believes in conspiracies. That goes with the territory. My main problem is that the book also contain many purely factual errors.

For instance, Childress writes that the Seljuk Turks ruled their empire from Constantinople-Istanbul around the year 1090. Come again? In reality, the Seljuk Turks never conquered Constantinople. That was accomplished by the Ottoman Turks, but only in 1453! "Around the year 1090", Constantinople was still the capital of the Byzantine Empire, which was neither Muslim nor Turk. This is not a minor error. Indeed, it's common knowledge that Constantinople fell to the Muslims in 1453. At least it should be to writers of medieval history.

Childress further claims that the Templars set up the Kingdom of Jerusalem. But the Templars didn't even exist during the First Crusade! He writes that the Normans who conquered Sicily before the crusades were Templars. Once again: there were no Templars at that time.

Most of these factual errors have no direct bearing on the conspiracy theories advocated by the writer. But some do. Childress wonders why the Templars were founded at all.
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Format: Paperback
This book is typical of Childress' books--mildly entertaining, but ultimately vaccuous. Chldress gives credence to every half-baked rumor and legend while failing to provide any level of decent support for his basic premise. If you're soldiered through his some of his other books you'll find material virtually rehashed word for word. If you like a collage of hodge podge stories and fabrications, you'll have fun enough but don't expect much in the way of substance.
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Format: Paperback
Pirates & The Lost Templar Fleet: The Secret Naval War Between The Knights Templar & The Vatican by David Hatcher Childress is an informed and informative study, an impressive history which opens new interpretations and possibilities between the lines of the official records. When the Templars were disbanded by papal order in 1307, their great fleet disappeared from its base at La Rochelle. What happened to these ships and their treasures? Pirates & The Lost Templar Fleet explores a number of fascinating possible theories, including the hypothesis that some Templars reached Canada 100 years before Columbus -- who perhaps had Templar maps in his possession when he set sail. Black-and-white illustrations embellish this amazing and iconoclastic study and theoretical reconstruction of the unknown. Also very highly recommended are three other thematically related titles from Adventures Unlimited Press: The History Of The Knights Templar; The Tamplars' Legacy In Montreal, The New Jerusalem; and Nostradamus And The Lost Templar Legacy.
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Format: Paperback
I am a firm believer in the concept that you must read every available source to get a complete understanding of the subject material (for me the subject is pirates). Ultimately, that means you will run across books like this one, with very little constructive value.

I have to speculate that with the hype over the Da Vinci Code and the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie (not to mention National Treasure), that the author has scraped together a bunch of disparate material in order to hit the market with a book that has some appeal to a wide audience. The book covers everything from world mapping Phoenicians to the Templars to the Middle-Eastern Assassins to Scottish Masons to the US war for independence and vague references to pirates from the Golden Age of Piracy.

I found the book to be entertaining reading, with a few chuckles, some LOLs and even one good ROFL. However, as a serious resource this book is lacking. My impression of the author's research methodology is: 1) formulate theory, 2) find supporting passages from other conspiracy theory authors, 3) claim theory is true. As an example, the author claims the Jolly Roger, skull and cross bones as a Templar symbol, ignoring the fact that the symbol dates from Roman times and most conventional historians like Peter Earle in his The Pirate Wars place the first recorded pirate use of the Jolly Roger at around 1700.

So, my recommendation is that there are so many good books on pirates out there with more substance, avoid this one, unless you are desperate to make some tenuous connection between the Templars and pirates
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