Customer Reviews


85 Reviews
5 star:
 (45)
4 star:
 (28)
3 star:
 (7)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Keep It Up MGM
I just about fell over backwards when I bought my copy of this DVD. As part of the special features, it includes an audio commentary by Roger Corman!
MGM Midnight Movies keep coming out, and my collection keeps growing. When I think of Vincent Price and Roger Corman, this gem is the movie that comes to mind. It is the perfect late-night horror film. If you've...
Published on November 17, 2001 by Robert E. Rodden II

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It was good with all the torture stuff!
Well, what can I say. It was good. Good use of torture weapons. Guy from Millenium was kinda gay in the movie. He was the bald dude. It was cool when they were burning the witch. It was also cool when the bald dude fell in the PIT OF SPIKESSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!! Im ok really. Anyway the movie was good.This is worth renting only once. Oh yeah there was a rat that got...
Published on January 16, 1999


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Keep It Up MGM, November 17, 2001
By 
Robert E. Rodden II (Peoria, IL. United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I just about fell over backwards when I bought my copy of this DVD. As part of the special features, it includes an audio commentary by Roger Corman!
MGM Midnight Movies keep coming out, and my collection keeps growing. When I think of Vincent Price and Roger Corman, this gem is the movie that comes to mind. It is the perfect late-night horror film. If you've seen this movie on VHS, you know what I mean, but you're not getting the whole thing until you get this widescreen DVD.
The quality of the film it perfect. I saw no noticable wear of picture quality. The sound it fantastic. Vincent Price's perfomance as the tortured and soon demented son of a mad Spanish Inquisitioner is perfectly played out. The lonely castle setting is pure gothic. The interiors of castle give the feeling of wondering in a huge and rambling castle. Barbara Steele is pefectly wicked and sexy. The love story between the hero and heroine never really developes, but who cares! We want to see Vincent go mad and take his revenge.
After I watched the film, I watched it again with the audio commentary turned on. It was fun hearing Roger Corman explain some of his movie tricks for giving depth and beauty to one of his low-budget masterpieces. Normally, the MGM Midnight Movie films only include scene access and the theatrical preview as the extras, so this was a fantastic extra for no extra cost!
Keep 'em coming MGM. You put them in the store, I'll put them in my collection!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most memorable final shots in horror film history, May 9, 2001
By 
After the success of "House of Usher," American International asked director Roger Corman to "adapt" another Edgar Allen Poe work to the screen. "The Pit and the Pendulum" seemed the logical choice, although the story itself is essentially unfilmable. Fortunately, screenwriter Richard Matheson (who did some of his best work for Rod Serling's "Twilight Zone") simply reused the "House of Usher" story line and tacked on "The Pit and the Pendulum" as the climatic scene. As long as Vincent Price was engaged in his celebrated over the top performance as Nicholas Medina, neither horror fans nor American lit majors were going to notice in this 1961 film.
The film is set in 16th century Spain as young Francis Barnard (John Kerr) arrives at the castle of Don Nicholas Medina (Price) to investigate the death of his sister, Elizabeth (Barbara Steele), the Don's wife. But all Francis gets from Nicholas is a...story about Elizabeth dying from "something in her blood." The young man investigates further and discovers that Nicholas had driven Elizabeth over the edge. It seems that Nicholas's father Sebastian was a leader of the Spanish Inquisition, had killed hundreds of people in the castle's crypts and had caught his wife in adultery with his brother. Young Nicholas watched his father bury his mother alive in a wall (sound familiar Poe fans?) and ended up scarred for life (you think?). Meanwhile, Nicholas is being haunted by ghostly going ons and becomes convinced he has buried his wife alive and she has returned to haunt him. When Elizabeth apparently rises from her tomb to confront him, Nicholas's mind snaps and he is driven into a homicidal dementia, which ends up with Francis being confronted with the title's instrument of torture as the film makes its way to the requisite
"The Pit and the Pendulum" improves slightly on the first film in the AIP Poe series. Certainly the visual elements by art director Daniel Haller are a vast improvement, from the eighteen-foot long one-ton pendulum to Medina's castle for which Haller gutted an entire soundstage and dressed all the way up to the roof to great effect. The Freudian implications beloved by Corman have to do with Nicholas's feelings for his mother instead of the brother-sister vibes we get in "House of Usher." Price is gloriously over the top but John Kerr does nothing with his role as Francis and for some reason Barbara Steele's performance is marred by the fact her voice has been redubbed. For me, what makes "The Pit and the Pendulum" memorable is the unforgettable final [scenes]. Irony can be both just and horrible at the same time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "The shrieking of the mutilated victims became the music of his life.", July 11, 2006
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Pit and the Pendulum (1961) was the 2nd of numerous successful Edgar Allan Poe inspired collaborations (the first being 1960's The Fall of the House of Usher) between writer/producer/director Roger Corman (It Conquered the World, Teenage Cave Man, The Little Shop of Horrors), writer Richard Matheson (The Incredible Shrinking Man, House of Usher, Tales of Terror), actor Vincent Price (House on Haunted Hill, The Tingler), and American International Pictures or AIP, for short. Also appearing here along with Price is Barbara Steele (Black Sunday, Castle of Blood), John Kerr (Tea and Sympathy, South Pacific), Luana Anders (Easy Rider, The Last Detail), and Antony Carbone (A Bucket of Blood, Last Woman on Earth).

The movie, set in 16th century Spain, begins as we see a man riding in a carriage along a coast approaching a matte painting of an ominous castle. The driver, unwilling to go all the way (isn't that always the case?), drops the man off a good distance from the matte painting...er, I mean castle, where he then has to hoof it the rest of the way. Turns out the man is named Francis Barnard (Kerr), and he's come all the way from England to inquire about the untimely demise of his sister, Elizabeth (Steele). Seems she married one Nicholas Medina (Price), moved into his castle, and then passed away under mysterious circumstances. As Francis arrives at the castle, he meets Nicholas' sister Catherine (Anders), who's returned home to look after the welfare of her brother (apparently Nicholas doted on his wife, and is taking her loss particularly hard). Soon Doctor Charles Leon (Carbone) makes the scene, and Francis learns his sister contracted some strange ailment Nicholas believes came from the `atmospheric miasma of barbarity that permeates the walls of the castle'...you see, Nicholas' father Sebastian was an inquisitor of grand proportions, so much so he had his own, private and extensive torture chamber set up within the caverns beneath the castle which saw a whole lot of action back in the day. After some flashbacks we learn of a couple incidents that occurred during Nicholas' childhood, incidents that have affected him in such a way as to make him a little unbalanced, a situation that isn't helped by the fact that the spirit of his dead wife is now haunting him. Things get a whole lot creepier as Nicholas decides to exhume his wife's corpse (seems she's interred in the crypts below the castle) after which some revelations are made, marking the real decent into madness as the comeuppance is dished out to all deserving, and even to some who aren't...I got to say, the last fifteen minutes alone is worth the price of admission, and that's one hell of a pendulum...

I've always felt The Fall of the House of Usher and Pit and the Pendulum to be among strongest and most accessible of the Poe based Corman films. Price gives an excellent turn as Nicholas, a character plagued by his father's past transgressions, driven to the brink of madness by circumstances beyond his control. Of all the aspects Price brings to these films, the one element that always seems to stand out for me is a sense of class. Price is the star here, and it seemed the rest were very content to follow his capable lead. My favorite bits in this film are when Price, in a dual role, is portraying Sebastian Medina, the inquisitor extraordinaire. He's a loathsome, vindictive character and a hell of a lot of fun to watch. The inclusion of Ms. Steele, who had just come from appearing in Mario Bava's Black Sunday (1960), was a bit of inspirational casting, in my opinion, as while her part may not have been large, it certainly was memorable. Few could pull off some of the facial expressions she was capable of, some of them quite frightening (I would have dreaded getting one of her wild-eyed, maniacal stares in the middle of the night). I thought Anders and Carbone did well enough in their roles, but I felt Kerr was slightly miscast. He's certainly a decent actor, but I never felt like he got completely into his role as some of the others...perhaps this an unfair judgment on my part as I think it would be difficult to compete against the likes of a Price or a Steele...ah well, this is was a fairly minor aspect compared to the whole. As far as Richard Matheson's screenplay, it comes off exceptionally well. Even if you're not familiar with the story, I think it's fairly obvious where things are going, but that didn't take anything away for me as the fun here was watching the events unfold. I thought the overall atmosphere of the production, assisted by Les Baxter's ookie musical scoring, went a long way, although I thought the use of the fake cobwebs a bit excessive at times. The usage of various matte paintings was obvious, but they were done well enough as not to take anything away for me. Normally I dislike the inclusion of flashbacks, but I thought they were handled well here as various hues were incorporated dependant on the mood of the flashback (a violent flashback would feature a blood red hue, etc.). I thought Corman's direction quite good but then it's no secret his affinity for the material. The film may seem a little slow going in the beginning, but I didn't mind at all as it allowed for Price to display his talents, and provided for an exceptional build up (as I said earlier, the last fifteen minutes or so are definitely worth hanging around for...). All in all this is an excellent feature, one that I think manages to capture a good deal of the mood within the original material, and just a heck of a lot of fun to watch.

The picture, presented in non-anamorphic widescreen (2.35:1) looks clean and comes across well, while the Dolby Digital mono audio, available in both English and French, felt a bit off at times, coming across a little uneven at times. Special features include a goofy original five-minute prologue segment, which I believe was used to help pad out the running time for television broadcast, an original theatrical trailer (in widescreen no less), a commentary track with Roger Corman, and French and Spanish subtitles. While this film was originally released onto DVD by itself, it was re-released later onto DVD as a double feature with The Fall of the House of Usher, so if you're interesting in purchasing this film, I'd recommend searching out the double feature as you may get a better value.

Cookieman108
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tour de Force ..., August 27, 2002
By 
Keeneye Reviews (Northeastern USA) - See all my reviews
This brilliant horror classic brought together the talents of a remarkable cast of actors in a memorable tale of madness, murder, torture, and revenge in 16th century Spain.
Vincent Price plays Nicholas Medina, an aristocrat suffering the recent loss of his beloved wife Elizabeth. John Kerr plays Elizabeth's brother Francis Barnard, and Luana Anders shines as Medina's gentle sister Catherine. Rounding out the cast is Anthony Carbone as Medina's treacherous physician Dr. Leon and Barbara Steele as Medina's adulterous wife Elizabeth.
The story in brief: Barnard arrives unbidden at Medina's lonely castle to investigate his sister Elizabeth's sudden death. He is welcomed with some hesitation by Elizabeth's widower Nicholas Medina and his sister Catherine. The youth receives confusing accounts of his sister's death from Medina as well as from the family physician Dr. Leon and resolves to remain until his questions are satisfied.
Spookery through the night and the next morning suggest Elizabeth's spirit walks the corridors of the castle. With great anguish, Medina decides to open Elizabeth's tomb; a rotting corpse is discovered and it is then Medina's greatest fear is realized -- Elizabeth was buried alive and died in suffocating agony. Medina stoically resigns himself to awaiting his wife's vengeance from the grave.
Elizabeth did not die however. She is alive and scheming with her lover Dr. Leon to rid herself of Medina once and for all. In the dead of night, she lures Medina to a long neglected torture chamber in the bowels of the castle with the intention of delivering her coup de grace. The sorry, half-crazed Medina there learns the truth of his wife's adultery, and, mustering an uncanny strength in his madness, turns the tables to ruthlessly serve the miscreants their just deserts. Medina then tortures the innocent Barnard with a razor sharp pendulum before being slain by his manservant. Having survived the maelstrom, Barnard and Catherine depart arm-in-arm.
Vincent Price plays the tragic Nicholas Medina to the hilt: his soul-in-torment arias are braced with pain-filled grimaces and his scenes in the torture chamber are thick with a subtle eroticism. At film's end the viewer is saddened that this gentle, cultivated, aristocratic, and too-trusting man suffers madness and death.
Blues dominate the film's palette and the musical score by Les Baxter - especially the 'Elizabeth' motif - is effective.
The film is a celebrated horror classic and the viewer will not be disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classy slice of period horror, July 9, 2005
This was the second Egdar Allan Poe story to be directed by Roger Corman with Vincent Price in the leading role ,and ,as ever,the director id indebted to his star for the quality of his performance and magnetism of his personality in helping make it a quality little movie.

Price is " Nicholas Medina " owner of a large and spooky castle in sixteenth century Spain ,which comes complete with its very own well equipped torture chamber ,courtesy of his late father ,a torturer with the Spanish Inquisition and a man who relished his work .(Price gets to play his father ,in one of the several flashback scenes ,and eploys a limp and a minor facial deformity to good effect in doing so )

He is in the depths of despair at the death of his young and beautiful wife ,Elizabeth and obsessed with the notion that he may have interred her alive ,just as his father did to his mother on discovering her adultery .In vain do his family doctor(Anthony Carbone)and daughter ,Catherine (Luana Anders) seek to ease his mind on that score .

Elizabeths' brother Francis (John Kerr) travels to the castle determined to get to the bottom of his sister's death .Sopon the residents and servants begin to hear strange noises -a harpsichord which only Elizabeth could play -and a maid claims Elizabeth spoke to her .Medina feels his grip on reality loosen ,a situation not helped when they open her tomb to see what appears evidence of premature burial .

Then screenwriter and adaptor Richard Matheson pulls out a neat double reverse twist ending as Price spirals into outright madness .

Price is wonderful -arch ,camp and knowing he revels in the flowery dialogue and chews the scenery with elegance and wit .Its a bravura performance and he is well matched by Barbara Steele as Elizabeth -more a presence than an acting talent ,she gives a compekking account of herself .The rest of the players are capable but dull by comparison .

Fluid and inventive camerawork by Floyd Crosby helps as does the splendid art direction by Daniel Haller who creates a memorable castle on very little money-cobweb festooned and with torches and castles flickerinfg sinisterly in their sconces

The climax is effective and my only real reservation is the way flashbacks dissipate tension slightly .This is a minor quibble and the movie is atisfying and stylishly done with a great star turn as the icing on the cake .

Enjoyable movie and well recommended
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic, March 29, 2004
This is an oldie but a goodie.
Very atmospheric and haunting, Pit and the Pendulum leaves me with some bad vibes (the bad vibes that a good horror movie should give).
The film is a worthy adaptation of the original Poe story. I encourage all young horror aficionados to pay their respect to enduring classics such as this one. There is noone in film today who can compare to Vincent Price.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fine A.I.P Adaption Of A Classic Edgar Allan Poe Horror Tale, April 28, 2005
By 
Simon Davis (Melbourne, Australia) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Starting in 1960 with the success of the American International Pictures release "The Fall of the House of Usher", producer/director Roger Corman began a highly successful collaboration with legendary Hollywood actor Vincent Price adapting a number of Edgar Allan Poe short stories into very atmospheric horror films glowing with rich technicolour. They really reached their creative peak with their second teaming in the classic story "The Pit and the Pendulum", which is my favourite of all the efforts they worked on together. Roger Corman long known as a low budget "B", movies specialist here has outdone himself with an incredibly lavish looking production that while having little relation to the original Poe story manages to weave a fascinatingly eerie tale helped along by one of Vincent Prices' best performances in this genre. "The Pit and the Pendulum", apart from employing the macabre torture device of the title in its gripping conclusion also boasts magnificently eerie sets, great period detail and beautiful tones of colour that are sure to warm the heart of any classic horror movie lover.

The story opens, (unusually for a Poe story), in 16th Century Spain where we see young Francis Barnard (John Kerr), travelling up to the sinister seaside castle of his brother-in-law Don Nicholas Medina (Vincent Price). Coming all the way from England however this is not just a social call as he is seeking answers to the sudden death of his sister Elizabeth (Barbara Steele), who was Nicholas' wife. Nicholas however is a most complex character himself and attempts to brush aside any discussion regarding Elizabeth's demise putting down simply to some problem with her blood. He is secretly tormented by the memory of his sadistic father Sebastian Medina (Also Vincent Price in flashbacks), who was a member of the Spanish Inquisition and set up his own private torture chamber in the basement of the Castle. Sebastian was also responsible for burying alive his unfaithful wife before his young son's eyes. In his tormented state Nichiolas also fears that he may have been responsible for burying Elizabeth alive as well and very soon strange noises are heard in the Castle including the sound of someone playing a harpsichord that only Elizabeth could play. All these strange occurences seem to indicate that Nicholas was right in guessing that Elizabeth has come back from the dead to torment him for his crime. Nicholas is counselled by the supposedly sympathetic family doctor Charles Leon (Anthony Carbone), that Elizabeth could not be alive and that what he is hearing is in his mind while Francis who is still trying to uncover exactly what happened to his sister begins to suspect the doctor and gets the impression he is anxious for him to be on his way before anything is discovered. However matters take a turn for the worst when Nicholas' mind finally breaks when Elizabeth's previously locked room is ransacked and he takes on the persona of his demented father believing that he is still back in the time of the Inquisition. When Elizabeth actually seems to "rise from the dead", however she and her "accomplise", plans goes badly wrong and dealing with a sadistic "Sebastian", rather than a mentally destroyed "Nicholas", as was planned both meet grisly ends in a deep pit in the cellar and imprisonment in a deadly iron maiden torture devise. Francis also runs into trouble with the reborn Sebastian who now views him as an enemy to be removed and Francis finds himself in the thrilling climax strapped to a table below a rapidly decending swinging pendulum that has a sharp cutting blade. It is only with the quick thinking of Nicholas' sister Catherine (Luana Anders), that he is rescued and the tortured Nicholas meets his own grisly end falling into the Castle's pit.

Rarely have any of the Corman /Vincent Price collaborations been as lavish as "The Pit and the Pendulum". From the wonderful visuals of Nicholas' sinister Castle literally howering on a mist shrouded cliff in the opening scenes to the tremendously atmospheric Castle interiors thickly laden with opulent furniture, mysterious sliding panels and a cobweb filled torture chamber with all manner of fiendish devices, this film is a special treat for the horror movie lover. Vincent Price of course is the centre of all attention here in his colourful roles of both the tormented Nicholas Medina and in the flashbacks, his evil father Sebastian and he brings his usual polished performing skills to the dual roles making "The Pit and the Pendulum", one of his most memorable films from the 1960's. John Kerr still best remembered for his performance on Broadway and in the film version of "Tea and Sympathy", surprisingly makes a fairly colourless young male lead here and really doesn't appear to do much with his character making it the one weakness in the acting ensemble present. Barbara Steele, mysteriously dubbed here for some reason, and Antony Carbone as the villians of the piece are wonderful in their roles and Carbone especially really excels as the "caring", doctor who is not all he first seems to be. Being a period film Roger Corman has gone all out in the visuals for "The Pit and the Pendulum", with rich colour and authentic 16th Century costumes really capturing the flavour of the time. The creepy atmosphere is further enhanced by the thunder storms and lightening that are of course almost an essential element in most horror tales but which here become almost a character in themselves as the raging storms seem to build in momentum and ferosity as Nicholas' state of mind slowly crumbles.

Vincent Price really had a complete rebirth as an in demand actor for horror films as a result of his hugely popular efforts in these Roger Corman horror films for American International. He always brings an integrity and style to his characters no matter how over the top the proceedings taking place in the stories are. The sight of a deranged Vincent Price gleefully hovering over John Kerr tied down beneath the swinging pendulum is probably one of the most famous horror images from the 1960's and this startling climax to the story helps make "The Pit and the Pendulum", an essential part of any horror lovers film library. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All in the Family, April 30, 2002
The Medina family has a lot of skeletons in the family closet. And the torture chamber. And the crypt. In Roger Corman's adaptation of Edgar Allen Poe's classic "The Pit and the Pendulum", we even get to see some of them. There is a vague, sketchy storyline to Poe's nightmarish tale, making it next to impossible to translate into a feature length film. Corman, the low-budget wunderkind of American International Pictures, along with screenwriter Richard Matheson, made a memorable filmic adaptation of the Poe story. The setting is 1540s Spain, where Englishman Francis Barnard has traveled to investigate the sudden, mysterious death of his sister Elizabeth. Elizabeth, wife of Nicholas Medina, son of a brutal grand inquisitor, has died of fright. Her grief-stricken, guilt-ridden husband fears that she has been interred prematurely. He has good reason, too. As a boy, Nicholas witnessed his father kill his uncle, then wall up his mother alive. And that's only part of the story! The film has its mysterious goings-on and recriminations, and builds to a heart-pounding climax featuring the title device. And there is a final, ironic twist to the film which I won't divulge to new viewers. Screen Matheson incorporated all of those feel-good Poe elements, i.e. madness, guilt, revenge, torture, premature burial, and of course, the title device, into the film. Corman's direction, along with Floyd Crosby's photography and Daniel Haller's art direction, make the film visually memorable and sumptuous, which is something of a miracle, due to budget-conscious American International. The matte paintings of the Medina castle and the "Pit and the Pendulum" are images wrenched out of a nightmare. The Renaissance costumes are handsome (altho the women's hairdos and makeup date the film), and Les Baxter's vivid score adds a great deal to the drama. Baxter's "love theme" takes on a very ironic meaning in the end credits. And now for the cast. Vincent Price gives a wonderful, over-the-top performance as Nicholas and his father Sebastian in an hallucinatory flashback. His Nicholas is classic Poe, a man living on the very edge of sanity. Some critics describe Mr. Price as hammy, but with such baroque, larger-than-life material, I don't think the "mumble" school of acting would exactly fit the bill. John Kerr is sulkily appealing as Francis, and the late, underrated Luana Anders and Paul Simon lookalike Antony Carbone lend good support as Nicholas' sister and best friend. And, of course, there is the strikingly beautiful Barbara Steele as Elizabeth. The tall, slender British brunette with the high cheekbones, pouty lower lip and large hazel-green eyes has been described by one fan as "horror chic personified", and "the illegitimate daughter of Christopher Lee and Cyd Charisse" by another. The talented Ms. Steele scored a hit in the Mario Bava classic "Black Sunday", and became one of the screen's most famous "Scream Queens", appearing in several European horror films, as well as several non-horror films. Her screen time in "Pit" is brief but unforgettable. Even when she is offscreen, she is spoken of, referred to, and you find yourself thinking, "When will we see her again?" Inexplicably, Ms. Steele's voice was dubbed in this film.
The picture quality on the DVD is superb. I have seen this film innumerable times, and seeing it in DVD format was like seeing it for the first time. The colors are rich, and the detail is razor-sharp (couldn't resist!) The sound is okay, not spectacular. There is also the rarely-seen prologue, which was filmed years after the film was made for its television airing in the late 1960s. It neither adds nor detracts from the film, but it is an interesting curio nonetheless. "The Pit and the Pendulum" is my favorite of ther Corman/Poe adaptations. Now, when are "The Masque of the Red Death", "The Haunted Palace", and "The Tomb of Ligeia" going to be released? So, for a real swingin' time, watch "The Pit and the Pendulum"!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vincent's Finest Hour? I Think It Might Be!, May 24, 2004
By 
David Von Pein (Mooresville, Indiana; USA) - See all my reviews
"Pit And The Pendulum" is definitely one of those "watch it late at night with the lights out during a thunderstorm" kind of motion pictures. All the elements are present here to elicit the appropriate "scary movie" emotions from the viewer -- Shock, terror, suspense, fright, uneasiness, and fear. (And maybe a few others as well.)
The setting of this 1961 film couldn't have been better presented on screen if they had tried. And Vincent Price, who was 50 years of age when the film was first released, gives a lively performance as "Don Nicholas Medina", a man who is slowly but surely going out of his mind.
The climactic scene in the "Pit" is simply astonishing. One of the best scenes in any horror film ever made!
This MGM DVD contains a Widescreen version of this color film (2.35:1 ratio). And, although not an Anamorphic (enhanced for 16x9 TV sets) disc, this DVD still offers up better-than-average video quality. The audio is Dolby Digital Mono (English and French tracks). Plus: this cover art is exceptional.
A few bonus items are on the disc, including a fun audio commentary by Director Roger Corman. The Original Theatrical Trailer and an "Original Theatrical Prologue" are also included here.
Before his death on October 25, 1993 (at age 82), Vincent Price appeared in 127 feature films (plus hundreds and hundreds of TV shows and radio plays) --- with "Pit And The Pendulum" being one of his very best, in my view.
If you like scary, atmospheric motion pictures, you have no choice but to be entranced when watching this DVD of "Pit And The Pendulum".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Spend some time in the dungeon, August 22, 2001
By 
Somewhat flat acting by everyone except Mr. Price (who is quite entertaining, if a bit over the top) is redeemed by terrific sets and subtle, effective direction by Mr. Corman. The widescreen transfer of the very good source print is crisp and bright, with wonderful colors. Mr. Matheson's story goes off in its own direction from the Poe original, but it nevertheless preserves many of the troubled author's beloved themes, and is involving and entertaining in a "literate comic book" type of way. A wonderful commentary track by Mr. Corman (who always has lots of great stories and inside info in his DVD commentaries) and a nice selection of genre trailers make this inexpensive DVD a great bargain. You get a lot for your money here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Pit And The Pendulum (1961)
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.