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A Place on the Corner (Studies of Urban Society) Paperback – February 15, 1981


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Paperback, February 15, 1981
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Product Details

  • Series: Studies of Urban Society
  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; New edition edition (February 15, 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226019543
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226019543
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,048,000 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

"Anderson is the consummate participant-observer..."—William Foote Whyte, author of Street Corner Society

This paperback edition of A Place on the Corner marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of Elijah Anderson's sociological classic, a study of street corner life at a local barroom/liquor store located in the ghetto on Chicago's South Side. Anderson returned night after night, month after month, to gain a deeper understanding of the people he met, vividly depicting how they created - and recreated - their local stratification system. In addition, Anderson introduces key sociological concepts, including "the extended primary group" and "being down." The new preface and appendix in this edition expand on Anderson's original work, telling the intriguing story of how he went about his field work among the men who frequented Jelly's corner.

About the Author

Elijah Anderson is the Charles and William L. Day Distinguished Professor of the Social Sciences, professor of sociology, and director of the Philadelphia ethnography project at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Code of the Street and Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community, the latter published by the University of Chicago Press.

More About the Author

ELIJAH ANDERSON holds the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professorship in Sociology at Yale University, where he teaches and directs the Urban Ethnography Project. His prominent works include the award-winning books "Code of the Street" and "Streetwise," and 2011's "The Cosmopolitan Canopy." His writings have also appeared in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and the New York Times Book Review. He lives in New Haven and Philadelphia.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book. I read similar narratives on street corner society, such as Talleys Corner, but Dr. Anderson's tome was done in a fashion that was understandable, his research methods were well-documented, and his interactions and encounters were well-written.

This piece deserves a lot more publicity.
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By Sierra Hendricks on August 12, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great read
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Liz Lizo on August 19, 2010
Format: Paperback
According to Anderson in every community there is an understanding and acceptance with conditions. The individuals meet and commune without crossing the boundaries of each other's territory. The process of social exchange allows them to produce a social order. This is also reflected in urbanization and urban society where groups form extended family to associate their identity with. This sheds light to a lifestyle that some had adapted to and some are quick to frown on.
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