Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.50
  • Save: $0.62 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used Book, Clean Pages and Text, Some wear, ships promptly
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Place Names Hardcover – October 1, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1564784780 ISBN-10: 1564784789

Buy New
Price: $11.88
10 New from $0.15 18 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $9.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$11.88
$0.15 $0.01
Paperback, Bargain Price
"Please retry"
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A little bit Borges and a little bit Calvino, French postmodernist Ricardou's newly translated 1969 novel proves a circuitous trek through a fictive landscape of eight metaphorically named places. Bannière, Beaufort, Belarbre, Belcroix, Cendrier, Chaumont, Hautbois and Monteaux—each gets its own chapter, and each serves as a source from which language springs, along with the whimsically opaque plot. In the medieval village of Bannière stands the 19th-century museum house of the late fictional artist Albert Crucis (simply the genitive of the Latin crux, 'cross' ), where a young traveler, whose name is not revealed until midbook, begins his visit to the area. He will run into an antiquarian dealer named Epsilon (l'espion, the spy) and an elusive woman in a red dress, named Atta, who shares his passion for recondite research into the work of Crucis. The two travelers dig for clues in the artist's allegorical paintings, which depict the eight places in question. Ricardou is a practitioner of the nouveau roman, and his experimental work frees the narrative from conventional rules and plunges it, delightfully, into quandary, contradiction and travel-literature parody. (Nov.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"With remarkable mastery, Jean Ricardou creates a fiction, like those of Borges, causes the conventional foundations of reality to tremble, and that brings with it, through its infinitely reflected simulacra, the collapse of reason beneath the vestiges of a question with no answer." --Alain Clerval<br /><br />"A little bit Borges and a little bit Calvino, French postmodernist Ricardou's newly translated 1969 novel proves a circuitous trek through a fictive landscape of eight metaphorically named places. Bannière, Beaufort, Belarbre, Belcroix, Cendrier, Chaumont, Hautbois and Monteaux—each gets its own chapter, and each serves as a source from which language springs, along with the whimsically opaque plot. In the medieval village of Bannière stands the 19th-century museum house of the late fictional artist Albert Crucis ('simply the genitive of the Latin crux, 'cross'), where a young traveler, whose name is not revealed until midbook, begins his visit to the area. He will run into an antiquarian dealer named Epsilon (l'espion, 'the spy') and an elusive woman in a red dress, named Atta, who shares his passion for recondite research into the work of Crucis. The two travelers dig for clues in the artist's allegorical paintings, which depict the eight places in question. Ricardou is a practitioner of the nouveau roman, and his experimental work frees the narrative from conventional rules and plunges it, delightfully, into quandary, contradiction and travel-literature parody." --Publishers Weekly<br /><br />"Is there inherent meaning in language, or, in assigning names to places and things, are we merely groping blindly for meaning that might not exist? Ricardou seems to advocate the latter in his latest deconstructionist work, a novel-cum-metafictional guidebook, which owes much to the tradition of the New Novel in its refusal to adhere to any conventional notions of storytelling. A notoriously difficult writer, Ricardou leavens his latest work with a much-needed playfulness as he describes villagers' attempts to construct historical significance based on the implications of the names of the places where they reside. His sentences, freed from the mundane task of propelling the plot forward, shimmer on the page like pearls dug out of the muck of ordinary language. His powers of observation are truly daunting, and his microscopic attention to detail, including the description of a single ant struggling for its life on a diminishing dry spot of rock, make one feel less content to accept meaning and names at face value and more interested in the kind of ruthless examination of the world at which Ricardou excels. Recommended for
literary fiction collections."—Library Journal --Library Journal

"A little bit Borges and a little bit Calvino, French postmodernist Ricardou's newly translated 1969 novel proves a circuitous trek through a fictive landscape of eight metaphorically named places. Bannière, Beaufort, Belarbre, Belcroix, Cendrier, Chaumont, Hautbois and Monteaux—each gets its own chapter, and each serves as a source from which language springs, along with the whimsically opaque plot. In the medieval village of Bannière stands the 19th-century museum house of the late fictional artist Albert Crucis ('simply the genitive of the Latin crux, 'cross'), where a young traveler, whose name is not revealed until midbook, begins his visit to the area. He will run into an antiquarian dealer named Epsilon (l'espion, 'the spy') and an elusive woman in a red dress, named Atta, who shares his passion for recondite research into the work of Crucis. The two travelers dig for clues in the artist's allegorical paintings, which depict the eight places in question. Ricardou is a practitioner of the nouveau roman, and his experimental work frees the narrative from conventional rules and plunges it, delightfully, into quandary, contradiction and travel-literature parody." --Publishers Weekly

"Is there inherent meaning in language, or, in assigning names to places and things, are we merely groping blindly for meaning that might not exist? Ricardou seems to advocate the latter in his latest deconstructionist work, a novel-cum-metafictional guidebook, which owes much to the tradition of the New Novel in its refusal to adhere to any conventional notions of storytelling. A notoriously difficult writer, Ricardou leavens his latest work with a much-needed playfulness as he describes villagers' attempts to construct historical significance based on the implications of the names of the places where they reside. His sentences, freed from the mundane task of propelling the plot forward, shimmer on the page like pearls dug out of the muck of ordinary language. His powers of observation are truly daunting, and his microscopic attention to detail, including the description of a single ant struggling for its life on a diminishing dry spot of rock, make one feel less content to accept meaning and names at face value and more interested in the kind of ruthless examination of the world at which Ricardou excels. Recommended for
literary fiction collections."—Library Journal --Library Journal

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Share your thoughts with other customers