A Place Out of Time: The Bordentown School 2010 TV-G

Amazon Instant Video

(8) IMDb 6.2/10

History of the Bordentown School, which taught values, discipline and life skills to generations of African-American children. Ruby Dee narrates.

Starring:
Ruby Dee
Runtime:
57 minutes

Product Details

Genres Documentary, Kids & Family
Director Dave Davidson
Starring Ruby Dee
Studio PBS
MPAA rating TV-G

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

5 star
75%
4 star
25%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kathryn E. Etier VINE VOICE on August 9, 2010
Format: DVD
Imagine a school--a boarding school--that is a self-contained, self-sufficient village. The students and teachers all live on campus, and everything they need is at hand. The school encourages growth and goals. It prepares its students for life and guides them to be achievers, emphasizing pride, self-esteem, morals, character-building, and discipline. Its teachers are mentors, role models, and surrogate parents. Best of all, its graduates look back on their days at school with fondness.

This was Bordentown, a New Jersey school located "High on a majestic bluff overlooking the Delaware River...the Bordentown Manual Training School for Colored Youth has provided the finest academic and industrial education for Negro children." Yes, you read that correctly, "Negro" and "Colored." For Bordentown, also known as MTIS, Old Ironsides, and The Manual Training Industrial School for Colored Youth, was established in 1886 as the Ironsides Normal School by Reverend Walter A.S. Rice.

New Jersey was a segregated state, and Rice opened a school for Black children, who were not at first included in mandatory education laws. Several years later, the State of New Jersey co-opted Bordentown. It was "The only state supported, elite, co-ed, all-Black boarding school north of the Mason-Dixon Line."

Bordentown's last graduating class was in 1955; the school, once known as "The Tuskegee of the North" was unable to attract white students "after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision." (It was also known as the "Black Forest Hills" because of its tennis facilities which attracted black athletes who were barred from the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Charlie Griffin on January 14, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video
I was born in Trenton, NJ in July, 1950. My father was a teacher at BMTS at that time. I was raised on the grounds and campus during the first five years of my life until the school closed in 1955.

The memories of that campus and its community spirit will stay with me for the rest of my life. It was an idyllic place to grow and thrive. Everything was there for a child to explore, and I have very fond memories of watching the pigs and cows, "Decoration Day," the Delaware River, the apple orchard, playing on the stage of the chapel and the camaraderie shared between students, staff and families. It was a beautiful campus and a place that I called home. I truly cherish the memory of those days.

Mrs. Bette Campbell, the woman speaking about life on the campus, was recently telling me about the day I was born and how she and her husband, "Campbell," drove my mother and father to the hospital for my delivery. She is a wonderful historian and has been a very close family friend since the 1940's.

I am very appreciative that this DVD was produced. My father had taken hundreds of photographs of the campus and students, and I have them to remind me of those good old days of growing up in such a safe, secure and beautiful setting. One couldn't ask for more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Angela on April 20, 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I thoroughly enjoyed this piece. I don't know why I never heard of the school before. I think it gives an excellent example of the conservative nature of people of color in this country. We don't want a handout, just an opportunity. We are perfectly capable of setting up our own infrastructure if allowed to do so. The school was a big success while it existed. Its success is what brought about its demise. It brings to mind the area in Tulsa that was destroyed in the 1920s. They tried to go about their own lives, but their successfulness was a little too much to handle by the white onlookers. Some people just won't accept the success of minority achievements. Why must there be an underdog? If you don't believe, look at our current situation in Washington. A white president would not be having all of the problems facing our current president. You'd think that the powers to be were trying to return to the Edwardian Era of the upstairs/downstairs mentality...and they don't care who suffers...and it didn't just start in 2008.
I am a retired teacher who found a way to give my students Black History every month, not just in February. I am sorry I didn't know about the Bordentown School. It would have been a welcomed instructional tool. This DVD is a valued addition to my African American artifacts collection I intend to pass on to grandchildren. There may come a time when this information could be hard to find.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Willie Williams on December 24, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Greatful that someone took the time to record the history of the school. What was even more of a reason to purchase a copy of the DVD was the fact that my wife's uncle attended the school and was in the video. My wife didn't know until she saw the video for the first time on TV.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again