Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$3.54
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: A well-cared-for item that has seen limited use but remains in great condition. The item is complete, unmarked, and undamaged, but may show some limited signs of wear. Item works perfectly. Pages and dust cover are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine is undamaged.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Places I Never Meant To Be: Original Stories by Censored Writers Paperback – June 1, 2001

4.3 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.94 $0.01

Calamity
Calamity
The third and final book in Brandon Sanderson's The Reckoners series. Hardcover | Kindle book

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In this provocative collection, Judy Blume, the censors' favorite target, assembles an all-star cast of young adult writers who have themselves felt the pain of censorship. Each contributes an original short story and some highly quotable observations on their own experiences and feelings when under attack. "Where once I went to my writing without a backward glance," writes Norma Fox Mazer, "now I sometimes have to consciously clear my mind of those shadowy censorious presences." The entries range from Jacqueline Woodson's ironic story of a neighborhood's casual acceptance of arson, to Harry Mazer's touching tale of a tough kid redeemed by a little boy's adoration. Two stories are especially intriguing to connoisseurs of teen fiction: Chris Lynch's "Lie, No Lie"--a selection that appears not to have made the cut for his novel Whitechurch--in which Pauly sets his friend up for embarrassment in a gay bath house; and the late Norma Klein's "Something Which Is Non-Existent," a previously unpublished story written in 1959 when this much-censored author was in college. Other stories by Katherine Paterson, Rachel Vail, Julius Lester, Walter Dean Myers, Susan Beth Pfeffer, Paul Zindel, Norma Fox Mazer, and David Klass contribute to this showcase of stellar talent. (Ages 11 to 16) --Patty Campbell --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Blume introduces 12 stories by distinguished yet sometimes censored writers, including Julius Lester, Katherine Paterson and Walter Dean Myers. Ages 12-up. (June)n

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Simon Pulse (June 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0689842589
  • ISBN-13: 978-0689842580
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #926,349 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I am 26 years old, but I love kids books still and an old favorite is Judy Blume. I have read every word that she has ever printed that I can get my hands on. So when I came across this book, I bought it immediately, especially when I saw names like Norma Klein, another favorite of mine, Julius Lester, a professor of mine at the University of Massachusetts, Walter Dean Myers, Katherine Paterson and others that I used to love to read. All of these stories are engaging and thought provoking and I really believe any lover of fiction, who believes in educating children and not sheltering them, should read this book.
Comment 10 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I loved these short stories. In some of them, I had difficulty understanding why they would be censored. So, okay, my favorite, Paul Zindel's "Love and Centipedes," is a little insane. It was also utterly perverse and simultaneously sickening and hilarious. This one is a real treat and focuses on one girl's infatuation with a popular high school jock with a cheerleader girlfriend. I also enjoyed Walter Dean Myer's "The Beast is in the Labyrinth," a look at the damaging effects of drug abuse (why would anyone have a problem with this story??) Other goodies include Julian Lester's "Spear" and another story called "Ashes," but just about every single one of these stories has something to offer. This book doesn't insult the reader's intelligence by hiding away subjects that it deems you are too immature to handle that exist out there in the world. I highly recommend it.
Comment 8 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on August 3, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Censorship has been plaguing our society for years. I haven't been ignorant to it, but some of the issues that the authors of the stories in this book discussed hit very close to home with me. They help reinforce that censorship can be a very ugly thing that, in some cases, is a worse fate than silencing an author altogether, for it often attacks their judgment and self-esteem. A wonderful read, it's also important to note that all royalties produced from the sale of this book go straight to the National Coalition Against Censorship.
Comment 7 of 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Places I Never Meant To Be is a collection of short stories written by censored writers accompanied by each writer's personal experience with censorship. While the stories are mostly good, some of them are a little 2 dimensional simply because they didn't have enough time to develop their characters and/or situations.
I personally enjoyed the commentary more than the stories simply because it introduced me to an issue that I knew very little about. I was a little ashamed when my own hometown was mentioned as being a place where ludicrous censorship has taken place.
If you're not much for short stories, you might do well to simply read the introduction and each author's point of view. If you are, then you will probably enjoy this book.
Comment 4 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book has a fantastic message with great insights from censored writers about how censorship affects their writing and the literary landscape, however the short stories which it contains are hit or miss, but more hit than miss.

The Mazer (well, both Mazers'), Lester, Vail, Myers, Pfeffer, and Zindel pieces are extremely strong addressing issues about race, body image, adolescent love and sexuality, and parental conflict in extremely unique ways. These stories really make their various themes feel fresh and new despite being, for the most part, heavily addressed topics.

The other stories are still good for the most part but fail to hit the high notes of the strongest offerings in the collection. The book is worth reading for inventive and fresh adolescent fiction and great insights into censorship, although it's likely that middle and high school level readers would get the most out of this collection.
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I could not put this book down! This kept me up and reading threw the night. Within this book, authors tell their stories, of why there book was banned, what their thoughts were, and it makes you ask yourself, "Was it necessary for this book to have been banned"? Authors like Judy Blume, David Klass, and Norma Klein all join together to express their feelings in the fight against National Censorship. These authors are all apart of the National Coalition Against Censorship. In this book, it gives you a brief summary of their thoughts and experiences with censorship. Then there is a chapter or two, on one of their own books. It really opens your eyes to the world of censorship.
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I first picked this book up on a whim. I heard about it from another source a few years back and saw that it had several authors in it that I read as a child/middle schooler. At the time I had little experience with censorship or banned books (my school district, by in large, held an indifferent opinion towards the reading material of their students) so when I saw that Judy Blume had been censored several times I kind of stared in stupification. It's Judy Blume for crying out loud--she was almost as popular a choice for me as the Baby Sitter's Club books or the Boxcar Children. I never in my life thought she was inappropriate.

Apparently quite a few people did.

In her introduction to "Places I Never Meant To Be" (which you can read online here, at her webpage) she talks about a particular book that first her mother told her she couldn't read until she was older, and then a public librarian told her she couldn't read without permission from her parents. A Rage to Live by John O'Hara was the book. I never read it, but Blume explains that once she had read it far from being influenced by the going-ons of the characters in the book, she was interested in reading the rest of O'Hara's books.

The other contributors to the anthology don't express similar stories, but they do talk about when their books had been challenged, their feelings, how it influenced their writing or the fight that ensued. Their stories push the boundaries of what is considered 'age appropriate'.
Read more ›
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse