Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums $5 Off Fire TV Stick Grocery pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Nintendo Digital Games Big Savings in the Amazon Fall Sportsman Event Baby Sale
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Places in the World a Woman Could Walk: Short Stories (Graywolf Rediscovery) Paperback – December 1, 1996

2 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, December 1, 1996
$17.96 $0.41
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$18.00

Purity by Jonathan Franzen
"Purity" by Jonathan Franzen
Check out Purity by Jonathan Franzen, a grand story of youthful idealism, extreme fidelity and murder. Learn more | See related books

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Places in the World a Woman Could Walk is deeply felt and bitingly precise. The author's dual professions of farmer and poet give the stories two gifts: an intimate, gritty sense of life on the land and a skill with language that amounts to alchemy."--Anne Tyler

"A distinctive voice both quirky and down-to-earth, totally unsentimental and capable of rendering reality's baffling undertones."--Library Journal

From the Back Cover

"Places in the World a Woman Could Walk is deeply felt and bitingly precise. The author's dual professions of farmer and poet give the stories two gifts: an intimate, gritty sense of life on the land and a skill with language that amounts to alchemy."--Anne Tyler

The women in Janet Kauffman's spirited stories are unafraid to look closely at their flawed lives. Burdened by the struggles of a rural existence, they are determined to embrace the simplest pleasures with a true heart. Whether slaughtering a favorite cow or leaving a violent husband, these characters make tough choices and live with the consequences.

"A distinctive voice both quirky and down-to-earth, totally unsentimental and capable of rendering reality's baffling undertones."--Library Journal

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 131 pages
  • Publisher: Graywolf Press (December 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1555972330
  • ISBN-13: 978-1555972332
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,939,422 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
0%
4 star
100%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By jenny.loves.fiction on July 25, 2010
Format: Paperback
Places in the World a Woman Could Walk is an intriguing collection of lyrical, humorous short stories. After reading this collection, I can see why Janet Kauffman, a professor of creative writing and English at Eastern Michigan University, has won numerous awards including the Pushcart Prize twice. The stories are about strong women who have to make difficult decisions in rural settings. What I enjoyed most about these stories was Kauffman's experimental style and language play. The character names were humorous, even sarcastic, poking fun at life and its absurdities. For example, a farm woman who is worried about slaughtering her cow, has the name "Lady Fretts" and her cow's name is "Suzie Hey Suzie."

The language is sharply lyrical and amusingly poetic which is what I enjoyed most about the collection. There is an ironic no-nonsense feel to her writing that screams all nonsense. At times the language has simple childlike rhythms, almost like nursery rhymes, yet there is an underling sarcasm and intellectual wit pervading. The contradiction is very entertaining. In the story "Harmony," Kauffman describes a character by all her exaggerated flaws and then says "...otherwise she'd be very beautiful." The narrator says, "Sherry has thick brown hair. Each strand is separate and crinkled. Her hair stands out from her head as if she's got herself over a sidewalk grate where a steady air is rising. What I like best about her is the gap between her teeth... otherwise she'd be very beautiful."

Overall, if you enjoy language play and laughing about the absurdities in life in bucolic settings, you might give this experimental collection a try.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. J. Smith VINE VOICE on July 14, 2000
Format: Paperback
Years after first reading this collection the image of a woman baling hay, taking off her shirt and tying it to the tractor as a flag still remains in my mind. These short stories are far more conventional than her novels e.g. Body in Four Parts. Her characters, however, are already strong females - in this case rural females - who love and loose. The plots of the stories are common but the voice of the author, the characters she builds already show the strength apparent in her later works.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again