Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Plain Princess Hardcover – June 1, 1945


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$783.36 $75.99
Paperback
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$59.00
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (June 1945)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0397301073
  • ISBN-13: 978-0397301072
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #353,075 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

The plays of Aurand Harris have been produced and applauded in thousands of productions around the world for nearly a half century. Harris was a prodigious dramatist, writing a new published play each season. He was a tireless experimenter of forms, themes, subjects. This modest man of irrepressible imagination and energy carried a vast array of honors and accolades. He was the first recipient of a National Endowment of the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship in Children's Theatre. He received an honorary doctorate from a mid-western university, and was introduced into the College of Fellows of the American Theatre. He was the first playwright to receive the Medallion of the Children's Theatre Foundation of America. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Phyllis McGinley was born on March 21, 1905, in Ontario, Oregon. In 1908, the family relocated to Colorado; they moved to Ogden, Utah, after the death of McGinley's father. McGinley was educated at the University of Southern California and at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. After receiving her diploma in 1927, she taught for a year in Ogden and then at a junior high school in New Rochelle, New York. Once she had begun to establish a reputation for herself as a writer, McGinley gave up teaching and moved to New York City, where she held various jobs, including copywriter at an advertising agency and poetry editor for Town and Country. She married Charles Hayden in 1937, and the couple moved to Larchmont, New York. The suburban landscape and culture of her new home was to provide the subject matter of much of McGinley's work.

McGinley was elected to the National Academy of Arts and Letters in 1955. She was the first writer to win the Pulitzer for her light verse collection, Times Three: Selected Verse from Three Decades with Seventy New Poems (1960). McGinley's other books of poetry include Confessions of a Reluctant Optimist (Hallmark Editons, 1973); Love Letters (1954); Stones from a Glass House (1946); A Pocketful of Wry (1940); One More Manhattan (1937); and On the Contrary (1934). In addition to poetry, McGinley wrote essays and children's books, as well as the lyrics for the 1948 musical revue Small Wonder. She died February 22, 1978, in New York City.

(biography from poets.org)

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on April 25, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The plain princess is plain, and this is a tragedy for the kingdom. Her eyes don't sparkle, her nose turns up instead of down, her mouth turns down instead of up, and she simply has no friends. The King and Queen offer a reward to anybody who can help her overcome her difficulties.

A widowed mother of five daughters takes on the task, taking the Plain Princess home with her to work her own magical cure, which involves working with her own hands, climbing tress, and thinking of others instead of herself.

McGinley is witty, and even though it sounds like dry bread moral tale, it is in fact a sweet and frothy mixture of love, lessons and laughter. I cherish my copy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Christenson on December 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I would dearly love to see this book in print again. It's a charming fairy tale about a young princess who learns what beauty and happiness really mean.

Esmeralda is the only child of the king and queen, and she has just about everything that a girl could want. The author paints a pretty picture of Esmeralda's life at the castle and all of the beautiful things she has. However, Esmeralda has one serious problem: she is plain. In her kingdom, in order for a girl to be considered beautiful, her nose must turn down, her mouth must turn up, and her eyes must have a twinkle in them. Esmeralda's appearance is exactly the opposite. It is a serious problem because her plainness causes people to lose respect for her, and the prince that she is betrothed to refuses to take much of an interest in her. Although her parents consult the finest physicians and wizards available, none of them can provide any solutions for Esmeralda's condition. It is only after the king places an advertisement in the newspaper that a widow with five daughters of her own comes to the castle and offers a solution. However, she insists that Esmeralda must come and live with her family for nine months. At first, Esmeralda is distressed at leaving her home and living in much simpler circumstances that she is accustomed to, but the reasons soon become as plain as the princess herself.

In spite of the fairy tale atmosphere, there is not really any magic in the story, as the widow herself points out. The real magic of the story is in the lessons that Esmeralda learns: that beauty and change come from within and that the way we see ourselves and those around us is important. The book also has some very pretty illustrations, some of which are wide scenes taking up two pages. It's a beautiful book and a beautiful story for any young girl.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Christenson on August 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I would dearly love to see this book in print again. It's a charming fairy tale about a young princess who learns what beauty and happiness really mean.

Esmeralda is the only child of the king and queen, and she has just about everything that a girl could want. The author paints a pretty picture of Esmeralda's life at the castle and all of the beautiful things she has. However, Esmeralda has one serious problem: she is plain. In her kingdom, in order for a girl to be considered beautiful, her nose must turn down, her mouth must turn up, and her eyes must have a twinkle in them. Esmeralda's appearance is exactly the opposite. It is a serious problem because her plainness causes people to lose respect for her, and the prince that she is betrothed to refuses to take much of an interest in her. Although her parents consult the finest physicians and wizards available, none of them can provide any solutions for Esmeralda's condition. It is only after the king places an advertisement in the newspaper that a widow with five daughters of her own comes to the castle and offers a solution. However, she insists that Esmeralda must come and live with her family for nine months. At first, Esmeralda is distressed at leaving her home and living in much simpler circumstances that she is accustomed to, but the reasons soon become as plain as the princess herself.

This edition of the book is actually a play based on the original. I didn't realize this when I posted this review. I have another copy of the review posted on an edition of the original book.

In spite of the fairy tale atmosphere, there is not really any magic in the story, as the widow herself points out.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mammy on February 7, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I received The Plain Princess within a week of ordering it. It was in excellent condition as advertised. The story itself is very cute with a poignant message about arrogance and how it affects how others see you as we'll as how you see yourself. I'm highly considering directing it at our school.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?