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86 of 87 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When Life Reverts to Plan B
There are a few key cities in American Christendom. Tulsa is the Mecca of the Gotta Have Faith movement. Colorado Springs is the center of all things evangelical. Nashville (or as some people refer to it as Nashvegas) is the city where Entertainment and Christianity have blended together into its own special synchristic religion.

When I review a book written by...
Published on May 3, 2010 by Chad Estes

versus
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Full Package on Grief
It is a compelling work on what to do when life does not turn out the way that you had planned, which so often is the case. Filled with poignant true life stories of individuals and couples who faced horrific disappointments in their life, Pete uncovers the hope that brought them through their tragedies to happiness on the other side.

The first thing that...
Published on August 10, 2010 by Joseph Cole


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86 of 87 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When Life Reverts to Plan B, May 3, 2010
By 
Chad Estes (Boise, Idaho, USA) - See all my reviews
There are a few key cities in American Christendom. Tulsa is the Mecca of the Gotta Have Faith movement. Colorado Springs is the center of all things evangelical. Nashville (or as some people refer to it as Nashvegas) is the city where Entertainment and Christianity have blended together into its own special synchristic religion.

When I review a book written by one of the pastors in these cities, I usually have an idea of the book's bent. As I picked up this book by Pete Wilson, pastor of the Cross Point Church in Nashville, I assumed it would have the "Who Wouldn't Wanna Be Me" flair. I mean the guy already looks like Keith Urban, why not use his lyrics too? Pete has a successful church with multiple campuses, a pretty blonde wife, three young boys, a popular blog, and now he's even published a book with a green cover that we can add to the list of everything we envy about him.

There are shelves of books on the Christian market that talk about the Good Life. There is a lot of preaching from our pulpits about the promises that will be ours if we pop our coins in their Christian slot machines. Problem is it's a losing gamble. More often than not, there is no payoff and we are left as broke and broken people.

Pete could have written about the good life. He didn't. Instead he wrote about the life that most of us live--when God hasn't shown up for us the way we thought, and have been sold, that he would. We all have an idea of what our life should look like, our Plan A. When that doesn't materialize, what will happen when we turn to Plan B?

Pete could have filled his book with stories of people who have made it. He could have included illustrations of people who faced adversity but overcame it to be even more successful than they once were. Instead, Pete shares stories of people who were well on their way and then it all crashed down around them. Some of their situations never bettered themselves--even when they tried playing the country music backwards they found out the return of their life as they knew it was just a Nashville joke.

Pete could have shared the Bible Stories in his book in such a way that all God-followers become prophets, priests and kings. Instead he shows how those in the scripture who actually had those titles were not strangers to disappointments and failures themselves.

Here's a taste of what Pete shares:

"We spend a lot of time worried about what is happening to us. We focus a lot of attention on when things might happen. We ask a lot of questions about where we will end up. Often in life, the what, when and where are not going to turn out the way you want them to turn out. You don't always get to choose those things, but you do get to choose the why. You may not get to choose what your future is going to be, but at any given time you do get to choose why you're living the way you do."

Pete could have shared 10 steps toward victory, overcoming, or finding perfect will of God for their life. Instead, Plan B, discusses how to keep living, how to keep breathing, how to have hope when life simply hasn't turned out.

"When people ask me how they can know God's will for their lives, I tell them the best first step is to know God. Beyond that, I really don't have any steps."

Have I made this book sound like a downer? It isn't. It's very real and very encouraging. Reading these pages I didn't feel so alone.

If Your Best Life Now, hasn't arrived. Or if it did but its stay was way too short, consider reading Plan B--not for Pete's sake, but for yours.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Plan B is a masterful guide to getting through the difficult times in life., May 9, 2010
By 
Jeremy Barr (Toledo, OH USA) - See all my reviews
After watching the news for the last few weeks, I think possibly more than ever, this book came out at exactly the right time. As I watch oil creep towards the beaches in the Gulf of Mexico, and as the flood waters recede from Nashville, I think many people are seeing their "Plan A" going down the drain and are wondering what to do, and I think this book really lives up to it's title when addressing our Plan B.
Pete has done a fantastic job with this book. I think most of us go through life expecting everything to go just as we planned it. To get that great job, find that perfect companion and get married, buy a great house and raise our 2.5 kids, and retire somewhere to gracefully live out our days watching our children and grandchildren. But realistically, that isn't always how it happens. You've yet to find that perfect mate, or maybe they walked out on you because they didn't want to be married anymore. That great job you had laid you off last year and you haven't been able to find steady work since. Maybe you've had kids, and one of them develops cancer, or they take a wrong turn and end up in jail. In an instant, all those things you've planned for go up in flames.

Pete doesn't pull any punches in his book, nor does he admit he has all the answers. I think that's one of the great things about the book. For everyone, our situations are a little different, and no one has all the answers, and Pete explains how to work through Plan B in our lives, but admits that he's walking the same path as the rest of us. I love the illustrations and stories that he uses throughout the book to illustrate different aspects of our lives and how we can learn to accept things when they don't work out the way we intended them.

I really enjoy the part where Pete talks about idols, and how Plan A in our lives for pretty much all of us turns into an idol.

Not many of us walk around saying, "I worship my stuff. I worship my job. I worship this pleasure. I worship her. I worship my body. I worship my dream.> But the trail never lies. In the end our worship, our idolatry, is more about what we do than what we say. And I think for those of us in the midst of a Plan B we'll discover that one of our idols all along has been a picture of the way life should be. Our idol was an expectation or a dream.

I have never thought about that before, and I think it's very true, at least in my life. Pete also talks about how God uses our Plan B in our lives. God will always take these situations in our lives where we have pain and struggle, and will never fail at the opportunity to show us how much he loves us. God never destroys our lives, but he does allow us to make our own decisions, even when those decisions take us farther away from God.

Pete also discusses our timing versus God's timing, especially in a Plan B situation. As Pete says, we often wonder where God is, why are things going so badly, and why do I continue to struggle through this pain for years and years. Too often, we want that pain to be over as quickly as possible, and we scream at God when it doesn't happen in our timing. Pete talks about the fact that God's timing is nothing like ours, and if there is a reason the pain is allowed to go on, maybe God is working in your life and his timing isn't ready for you to be out of this season in life. A tough thing to swallow, that's for sure, but very true.

I especially liked the illustration Pete used that explains why, when we're in a painful situation, we think God isn't there. In all reality, maybe we've pulled away from God, and he's been right here all along, just waiting on us to come back to him. He's never left us. This was something I've never really considered, and too many times I've asked God where he was, why wasn't he fixing this, why weren't my plans coming true. When in all reality, maybe I've been the one running from God and he's never left me, but instead, I've tried to leave him.

This book was absolutely fantastic, and I would highly recommend everyone pick this up. Even if you don't read it right now, or things are going according to your plan for life; sooner or later, you're going to run into a Plan B, and I think this book is an excellent instruction manual to help you deal with and makes it through those situations in your life. Pete has done a fantastic job with this book, and I'm really looking forward to reading the next book that he writes.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Working through the Plan B's of Life, April 21, 2010
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Any time I pick up a book that approaches a topic from a faith standpoint, especially from a new author, my hyper-analytical antenna raise. In a day where celebrity can become more important than the message it is important to test the messenger and the message.

Pete Wilson is the pastor of Cross Point church in Nashville, TN and the author of WithoutWax.tv blog. The book, Plan B, mirrors the message and the person that he presents in both the church and blog mediums.

Plan B is a book intended to help the reader deal with those moments in life where things have not turned out the way they had dreamed or hoped. Let's face it, most of us have either had one of those moments or will. Someone once said that life is what happens when we are planning for it. So how can we deal with those unexpected twists in our lives? While this book is presented from a faith standpoint and will speak very clearly to the Christian reader, it brings a lot of practical wisdom that the non-Christian reader will benefit from as well.

Pete's conversational style has a way of drawing the reader in to the inner circle of the stories he relays as examples for the lessons he has learned from his own life or from others. It is easy to laugh along and to grieve along with the persons inside that circle that Pete invites you to witness.

So what do you do when faced with that moment when the world seems to fall away from under your feet? Do you run? Do you stand paralyzed not knowing what to do? Do you struggle with who to turn to or understanding where help can come from?

I recommend you pick up Pete's book and take a journey through the process. You won't find all the answers and he is wise enough to tell you that himself in the book ... but you may find an anchor in the storm of your life that will help you weather your Plan B.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Read if Life Ever Did Not Go As Planned!, May 10, 2010
Everyone should read Plan B! Pete Wilson has a gift of walking readers who are hurting--who have had their life shattered by events--and showing them that God is indeed there walking with them through this pain. I believe everyone in their life has a time where things do not go as planned. You lost a loved one to early, a spouse walked out, or you are battling a physical aliment. No matter what the situation is Pete Wilson shows us through passages of scripture the many biblical characters who lived their whole life living out Plan B and how God used their Plan B to bring healing and glory to God.

If you have someone who is going through a difficult time this would be the prefect book to pass along. This will be a book I keep on my shelf to read whenever things don't go as I had planned.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Help from the Lord When the Flood of Trouble Comes, May 7, 2010
Being in the right place at the right (perhaps wrong) time can be a marvelous but challenging thing. Such is the case for mega-church pastor Peter Wilson in the release of a book on suffering (Plan B: What Do You Do When God Doesn't Show Up the Way You Thought He Would) right as the Nashville flood fell on his own home town. Wow. Talk about God's providence! Yet when a deluge of trouble and pain befall us, what do we do? Wilson provides some real life answers as one turns to God in faith. The good pastor reminds the reader that the Lord declares that He is always with us. So when a torrent of challenge or pain comes out of nowhere, like in TN, turn to God and know that He is with you even when He seems far away, even if the damage and pain remain.

The Bible says: "And may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in Him, that you may overflow with hope through the power of the Holy Spirit" (Romans 15:13).

I can get through pain, trouble, and suffering when I:

- Look to God's word, follow Him and glorify Him alone even in the midst of great trouble.
(2 Timothy 3:16-17; Luke 14:27).
- Decide to focus on eternal things (Colossians 3:2).
- Be amazed that Jesus loves His people (Galatians 2:20)!
- Trust Jesus - believe in Him for all things (John 14:1;
Ephesians 3:20).
- Pray for help and comfort(1 Thessalonians 5:17).
- Look to the Gospel for hope (Rom. 1:16; 1 Corinthians 15:3-4).

"O LORD, You have searched me and known me. You know my sitting down and my rising up; You understand my thought afar off. You comprehend my path and my lying down, and are acquainted with all my ways. For there is not a word on my tongue, but behold, O LORD, You know it altogether. You have hedged me behind and before, and laid Your hand upon me. Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high, I cannot attain it. Where can I go from Your Spirit? Or where can I flee from Your presence? If I ascend into heaven, You are there; if I make my bed in hell, behold, You are there. If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there Your hand shall lead me, and Your right hand shall hold me... for You formed my inward parts; You covered me in my mother's womb. I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made; marvelous are Your works, And that my soul knows very well. My frame was not hidden from You, when I was made in secret, and skillfully wrought in the lowest parts of the earth. Your eyes saw my substance, being yet unformed. And in Your book they all were written, the days fashioned for me, when as yet there were none of them. How precious also are Your thoughts to me, O God! How great is the sum of them! If I should count them, they would be more in number than the sand; when I awake, I am still with You" (Psalms 139:1-18).

Trust the Lord in bad times and especially in good times; when trouble comes rushing in, turn to the Lord for He is your ever present help. For without the Lord, fear will overrun our hearts.
Forasmuch as while the atheistic Darwin of the later years cringed under his shawl, suffering an endless catalog of psychosomatic ailments, fearless Christians like Dr. David Livingston and General Charles Gordon roamed Africa to stamp out slave trading... by Arab traders and by the Africans themselves. Livingston, in particular, was a man of such intense Christian conscience that even the Arabs he was struggling to put out of business respected him for his integrity.
The Necessary Existence of God: The Proof of Christianity Through Presuppositional Apologetics
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Because God is in even the most devastating of situations, Roll with it!, May 7, 2010
By 
I wasn't really sure what to expect from this book.
Though for some reason, I was really excited about the prospect of being one of the first 500 to read it.
(You can ask anyone I know...I would not shut up about getting this book!)

As a book, it was easy to read.
If you've ever heard Pete speak, you can clearly hear his voice in the storytelling.

As an idea, Plan B is a little more difficult.

As I read through, two words kept creeping into my mind.

1. Heartbreaking
2. Hopeful

As a follower of Jesus Christ, we tend to have certain expectations of how life is supposed to be.

Relationships.
Family.
Jobs.
Ministry.

We are supposed to be blessed in these things, right?
Pete gives two answers to that question: Yes, and of course, No.
And though these may seem mutually exclusive, they are incredibly inseperable.

Telling personal stories from his own life and those to whom he has been able to minister during his time as a pastor, and coupling those stories with examples from the Bible (most notably the story of Joseph and his brothers), Pete has put together a book that is all at once wholly heartbreaking and hopeful.
Making it clear that though things may not be the way you want them to be, God has a purpose in that.

Pete doesn't lay out a plan to understand why God does the things He does.
Nor does he even make an attempt to explain why bad things happen.
He simply offers hope that God is present in those times as well.

I think it is worth noting that over the past week, I've been able to witness Pete's belief in this hope via twitter.

As you probably know, Nashville has recently encountered a flood of epic proportions.
Houses and livelihoods destroyed.
Lives turned upside down.
Thousands of people not knowing what comes next.
If ever there was a city in the midst of Plan B, Nashville is it.

Maybe it is just a coincidence that this is where Pete Wilson is the pastor of Crosspoint Church.
Either way, Pete and the people of Crosspoint have been leading the way in relief efforts.
For whatever reason, God has allowed this tragedy to fall on Nashville.
Instead of being discouraged, Crosspoint has made a conscious decision to roll with it.
Because God is in even the most devastating of situations.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Plan B is Solid, April 27, 2010
By 
There are books I always like to keep in my office to give people I think might benefit from them. At various times I given out The Barbarian Way: Unleash the Untamed Faith Within by Erwin McManus, or The Divine Conspiracy: Rediscovering Our Hidden Life In God by Dallas Willard. Recently Crazy Love: Overwhelmed by a Relentless God by Francis Chan has been my favorite giveaway. I've now found another: Plan B: What Do You Do When God Doesn't Show Up the Way You Thought He Would? by Pete Wilson.

Plan B's subtitle is "What Do You Do When God Doesn't Show Up The Way You Thought He Would?", and that's the whole premise of the book. In a very conversational style, Pete walks us through both possible reasons and responses to times of life when things just don't turn out they way we want, when we have to go to Plan B. As I read the book, at the end of each chapter, I would think, "That's the chapter written for me." Turns out, I needed to hear everything Pete had to say.

Pete includes many stories of himself, and those he knows, to illustrate how God works in and through the difficult times we all face at some point. He doesn't pretend to have all the answers, either. But he does help us find some solid ground to stand on when it feels like our foundations are crumbling beneath us.

I highly recommend Plan B to you. It's a great read. Pete really connects with his writing style and transparency. You'll find comfort, even when you might not find answers. I think you'll want to share it, too. I'll soon have a few in my office.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Full Package on Grief, August 10, 2010
It is a compelling work on what to do when life does not turn out the way that you had planned, which so often is the case. Filled with poignant true life stories of individuals and couples who faced horrific disappointments in their life, Pete uncovers the hope that brought them through their tragedies to happiness on the other side.

The first thing that struck me in reading the book is how comprehensive it is. Many who write on the subject of personal pain tend to limit their scope to a particular type of suffering. Some speak of chronic illness. Others of relational crisis. Still others of personal failure. Pete covers them all, including the loss of lifelong dreams. Relating these circumstances to the lives of Biblical characters, Pastor Wilson assures us that even if we don't know understand what is happening to us, we can trust that God is still loves us.

That's the crux of the book. All of us have some kind of plan for our lives. It's a good plan with success and happiness in the picture. The reality is that each one of us, with our carefully thought out plans, will be forced to throw the plan away and divert to a plan we never considered-Plan B. Plan B's come in many forms, but they will come. In those times, we can choose to trust that God is there and will walk us through it, or we can give up hope.

Pete Wilson points us to the cross as the sign of hope's triumph, even in the face of a Plan B. God did not keep His Son from a painful event, even death. Yet even in death, God still had the last word and resurrected His Son. In the same way, God always has the last word and will resurrect our broken souls.

Get the book. You won't regret it.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Choose carefully when you read this book, May 18, 2011
What you take away from Plan B by Pete Wilson will depend on when you read it. The first time I read it, I was looking to clean my plate and start thinking new directions. Perpetually in "Plan B", I found pieces that resonated and they were a balm to a hungry soul. I also found pieces that were just a little too cliche. The second time I read it I was in the midst of cleaning that plate, face to face with uncertainty, and looking for something to hang onto as those uncertainties mounted. Again, I found things that resonated, seemingly "spoken" at just the right time. I also found the cliches, except this time they were even more full of emptiness and actually aroused my frustration with Christian "pat theology and answers". I also found that questions I had asked in the past now resurfaced with fresh energy and urgency.

If I could summarize the book in a few words it would be, "Expected the unexpected, don't manage outcomes, trust God, avoid mediocrity, in the end it will be okay...everything will work out." And this is both the good and the struggle of the book. It mixes truths (expect the unexpected, don't manage outcomes) with empty hope. It leaves one waiting until that final day when everything is made right; it leaves us running an endurance race on this side of eternity without any expectations of resolutions on this side. It leaves the reader equipped to ever expect the rug to get pulled out from under you at any moment and any cry of foul to be an exposure of a lack of faith and maturity and transformation.

Wilson spends "classic" time reminding us God owes us nothing and thus can do whatever he wants. I don't think that's biblical at all. Yes, he owes us nothing but in giving us everything he creates healthy expectation and sets parameters for what he can and will do - not entitlement but definitely expectation. To not allow that is to advise a life of "look but do not touch". Expectations should not be limited to character building and spiritual formation. Wilson divorces the physical from the spiritual (perpetuating deceptive dualism) as if the things that we can see and touch are "less than" the things we can't. Thus when he repeats the cliche of "follow the trail of your time, affections, energy, money, allegiance and at the end you will see your throne", he repeats the error that says the only good things you can expect are the things you can't touch and the things that happen in the end.

He repeatedly says "Christ can" and that "God specializes in resurrection and hopeless situations" but then counters with, "It's possible things will get worse, not better...you might have to live all your life with the pain of what you had and lost."

If we cannot hope for resolutions now, if we cannot hope for reconciled relationships, restored opportunities, food in our stomach and shelter over our heads each day, here and now, but must see the experience of any of that as some kind of early bonus to tide us over to the real thing at the end of it all, then what is the point of the gospel? That's all people hoped for before Christ came; that's why the woman at the well said, "in the last day" and Christ countered with, essentially, "no, now".

Plan B will resonate with those who have known uncertainty. But it will also frustrate those looking to have their faith refreshed that the gospel is for here and now and not just some final day of grand fulfillment.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Smashing Our Idols and Anchoring Us to the Cross, May 2, 2010
By 
I wish books like Plan B didn't need to be written.

And if I had to guess its author, Pete Wilson, does too.

"Do you remember the day you discovered your life wasn't going to turn out quite the way you thought?" asks Wilson (p. 1).

Whether it's a certain job, or children, marriage--whatever it may be--we've all got plans and dreams for our lives. The question is are our plans and God's the same?

"Whatever you wanted for your life, if you're a Christian, you may well have assumed God wanted it for you as well. You might not admit it, even to yourself, but you were pretty sure God was going to sweep down and provide for you as only God could do. The problem is, what you assumed was not necessarily what happened." (p. 4)

Wilson reveals our issue when dealing with any sort of trial: We are completely flabbergasted when it happens! We assume that our plans are what God intends--and when those things don't work out, we're left spinning our wheels.

And Wilson seeks to encourage his readers to move forward in their new normal and look to Christ as their only source of fulfillment.

One of the things I appreciate most in Plan B is Wilson's obvious pastoral heart. His love for people saturates every word of this book as he describes the end of marriages, the self-destructive behavior of godly parents' children and a host of other situations.

But, where it becomes most evident is when he approached the real issue: The cross.

"You need to know that the cross is not just the starting line," he writes. "It's the very centerpiece of your story with God. It's the place where the pain of `you will have trouble' meets the triumph of `I have defeated the world.'" (p. 149)

The cross, Wilson says, is the reason we can have hope even in the midst of our greatest crises. He describes it as the anchor we need when the world seems bent on turning our lives upside down.

"When our lives are being rocked by this broken world, we need to look to the cross as a reminder that God can and will redeem our circumstances. God does love us, and that supersedes whatever Plan B situation we might be going through." (p. 150)

But can we see it? Or are we blinded by idols?

What causes us the most grief during a time of trial, a "Plan B situation"?

Our idols are revealed.

Wilson isn't afraid to call all of us--even himself--out on this. He writes,
"I think all of us have at least one area of our lives where we're tempted to pursue something other than God. . . . So how do you know where and what you worship? . . . Follow the trail of your time, affections, energy, money, allegiance. Follow the trail of all of these things. At the end of that trail, you'll find a throne; and whatever--or whomever--is on that throne is what's of highest value to you. It's your ultimate . . . your idol . . . your adulterous lover. [T]he trail never lies. In the end our worship, our idolatry, is more about what we do than what we say." (p. 153-154)

Our idolatrous hearts are revealed in our suffering and difficulties when our dreams and desires are sometimes torn away from us--because we love them more than we love God. We try to use Him as a cosmic vending machine to get what we really want. But this view of God always fails when we are confronted by a God who is completely outside of our control. And He smashes our idols.

Where the book suffers is that it sometimes skirts around the larger reality of "Plan Bs"--that God has no "Plan B." Not for our lives, not for creation. Maybe it wouldn't have fit the tone of the book, but this is something I would have appreciated seeing delved into a little more explicitly.

There's a tension between how we see our lives play out and God's ordaining all things before the creation of the world that is, frankly, hard to understand. But it's a tension that we live in and must embrace.

We can get so focused on the "I don't knows" that we can start to assume that God doesn't know, either. Fortunately, Wilson reminds readers that there's a difference between understanding and trusting. "Trust is what we need when we don't have understanding," he writes. (p. 225)

I wish books like Plan B didn't need to be written. The suffering we will all endure while living in this fallen world is unbearable without Christ.

Plan B is a reminder of just how desperate our situation is, and how utterly unprepared we are when suffering comes.

I wish that books like this didn't need to be written; but I'm glad that some are.

------

A complementary copy was provided for review purposes by the publisher
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