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Planescape: Torment - PC

Platform : Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows 95
Rated: Teen
233 customer reviews
Metascore: 91 / 100
91

List Price: $79.95
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Planescape: Torment - PC + Baldur's Gate 4 in 1 Boxset + Icewind Dale 3 in 1 Boxset (Icewind Dale / Icewind Dale: Heart of Winter / Icewind Dale II)
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Product Description

Product Description

The Planescape "multiverse" is the setting for the game - but setting is actually a misnomer... the Planescape multiverse is actually composed of a series of "planes" (other dimensions) that rotate around a central city, Sigil, like spokes on a wheel.

Amazon.com

Explore Sigil, the City of Doors. The doors serve as the town's gateway to everything and everywhere that matters. Step through one door and enter the halls of Ysgard, or turn down a particular alley and discover the Abyss. There are more gateways in Sigil than can be imagined. But there's a lot more out there than just Sigil. Get outside the city and there's the planes themselves: the throne of the gods, the battleground of the eternal Blood War, and home to more horrors and wonders than ever existed on any prime world. There's enough crusades, exploits, treasures, and mysteries to keep a band of adventurers busy for centuries to come. All it takes is the right door, so step right through.

Product Details

  • Domestic Shipping: Item can be shipped within U.S.
  • International Shipping: This item can be shipped to select countries outside of the U.S. Learn More
  • ASIN: B00002EPZ2
  • Item Weight: 4 ounces
  • Media: DVD-ROM
  • Release Date: December 14, 1999
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (233 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,924 in Video Games (See Top 100 in Video Games)
  • Discontinued by manufacturer: Yes

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

248 of 254 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Boyd on September 2, 2002
First, you have to ask yourself: why is a game from a few years ago STILL getting 5-star reviews -- a bunch in just the past couple months?!? And second: how could a 2-D game (like the Baldur's Gate 1 and 2 series) possibly hold up against 3-D games like Neverwinter Nights? Well, it's because of gameplay. It's remarkable.
You start out by waking up on a slab, in a cemetary. You have no memory, but you've got a lot of wordy tattoos all over your body, and a very talkative floating skull to fill you in. As you progress, you'll meet up with many other characters who can join your group (or not), including a strange living computer called a Modron, and a bizarre man engulfed in flames.
But what really makes the game stand out is how open-ended it is. It's like Morrowind in that respect. You can do anything, go anywhere, fight or talk, do some quests and ignore others. Your character can find "masters" who will teach your character to fight, become a magician, or a thief. You can even switch back and forth. But even better than that is the dialogue, which is NOT forced or pre-programmed to lead you one way each time. The dialogues that each character speaks can take into account your experience, your intelligence, how attactive you are, where you are in the game, etc.
One of the most amazing discoveries for me went like this. Playing the game the first time, I had a fairly average character who was very strong. Some of the dialogue with Ravel, about two-thirds into the game, was just stunning. The plot twists threw me for a loop. But then I played again with a wimpy but incredibly smart character. I was stunned to see my character pulling out plot details from the characters almost as soon as they joined the group.
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127 of 129 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 28, 1999
This has to be one of the most creative <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/electronics/browse-electronics/-/229593/002-2818223-1369817">RPGs</a> I've ever played. The graphics and animations are impressive, stylized, and original. The plot is relatively non-linear and effectively rests in the hands of the player with multiple endings. The alignment and attributes of the player character affect game play. I played a character with high intelligence and wisdom, and I enjoyed outwitting people in the game. Although the game is VERY dialog driven, I felt there were enough graphics and action to make it feel relatively balanced and seamless. The NPCs are highly original and interact with the party to a much greater extent than in Baldur's Gate. Talking to your party members can be integral to being successful at a Succubus, who has given up her past; a sarcastic, floating skull who can taunt enemies with profanities; a wild and unpredictable Tiefling (part human/part lower plane) thief who seems to have a thing for you . . . Guest voices include Dan Castellanetta (Homer!), Sheena Easton, and Michael T. Weiss (The Pretender). The game is very dark and somber with appropriate music that really added to the mood, yet has very effective comic relief via. Morte the sarcastic skull. I was genuinely surprised by the plot and character development. I was always kept guessing. Your immortality allows for many creative developments. Dying becomes a method to be taken to a place you want to go. Limbs are taken off and reattached. A woman pays you for the privilege of killing you. The magic and magic items are phenomenal.Read more ›
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135 of 140 people found the following review helpful By Lucian Wischik on March 13, 2000
Torment is the best computer game I have ever played. It feels wrong to call this 'just a game'. Computer games will become an important new art form in the coming century, and Torment gives us a delicious foretaste of what is to come.
Moral choices abound. The game takes note of what you say and do, and rates your morality and alignment accordingly. The game itself changes depending on how you play it: each action and choice closes some doors and opens others. Consider a point in the dialog where you are offered these choices. (1) Vow: "Tell me and I will not harm you" -- (2) Bluff: "Tell me or I'll break your neck" -- (3) Threat: "Tell me or I'll break your neck" -- (4) "Please tell me". This illustrates the sort of choice that gives expression to your moral character.
You feel like an actor in a play -- but one who can choose his own script. This brings you very close to your game character. When it was revealed that a past incarnation of my character had committed some evil, I personally felt heartbroken about it. This sort of immersion-into-character is not possible in a conventional novel.
The story is compelling and meaningful. It is supported by excellent writing. Some of the key dramatic scenes are still going through my head two months after completing the game. It is an ongoing source of delight to discuss and discover new interpretations of the story and characters.
The characters are deep and complex, and funny. You get the feeling more than in other games that they have their own agendas. Eventually some of their secrets are revealed and -- best of all -- you yourself, in the game, are the one who discovers those secrets.
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