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Planetary: Crossing Worlds Paperback – April 1, 2004


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Product Details

  • Series: Planetary
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Wildstorm (April 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401202799
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401202798
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 0.5 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #664,447 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The Ultimate Answer, January 2005; " I defy you to dislike it." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Warren Ellis' prolific writing can be seen on such varied and acclaimed titles as The Authority, Transmetropolitan, Lazarus Churchyard and the award-winning Planetary, as well as on the forthcoming Ministry of Space, Morning Drgons and Scars. John Cassaday is perhaps best known for his work on Planetary, but has also drawn the likes of Captain America, Union Jack and Daredevil. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

The last novella is Ellis & series's artist John Cassaday at their absolute best.
Hadourien68
This is a good read for fans of Planetary, Batman,and/or Alternate Superhero History.
Charles F Royal
I didn't read all the series but getting this is like getting a couple comics in one.
dodgerofdeath

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dave Jenkinson on April 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
Crossing Worlds collects three previous Planetary stories, all of them crossovers: Planetary/Authority in which both teams encounter the same evil Lovecraftian threat, then independently repel an invasion from the Bleed; Planetary/JLA where the heroless DC universe is ruled by the very Four-like Planetary corporation and it's up to Clark Kent, Diana Prince and Bruce Wayne to find out why; and lastly Planetary/Batman where the field team meet the Batman during an encounter with the son of Science City Zero survivor in Gotham City.
Planetary/JLA is the only one (seemingly) out of continuity with the series for those that care about that sort of thing. All three are good stories with great art. My only complaint is that each are very brief and could have benefited a great deal from an extra ten or so pages to let the story unfold.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By James Todd Haney on February 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
PLANETARY, by Warren Ellis and John Cassaday, has been one of the most fascinating comic book series I've ever seen/read/enjoyed. It concerns the adventures of a group of mystery archeologists who go round the world uncovering the hidden bits that keep our world a strange place to be in, the way it SHOULD be. These bits take on the shapes of major comics culture touchstones embedded in the conciousness of die-hard fans (Monster Island, Superheroes, Sherlock Holmes, Doc Savage) but with that arcane twist that has made Ellis a great postmodern comics writer (anothe great title is GLOBAL FREQUENCY--ever wonder what the $6 Million Dollar Man would REALLY be like? Take a look, if you dare.)

The team, made up of: Elijah Snow, born at the turn of the 20th century, has the power to generate cold, cranky as all get-out and the founder of the Planetary Agency; Jakita Wagner, an orphan who hates to be bored and is as powerful as she is beautiful; and the Drummer, who can communicate with any and all mechanical devices with the help of his drumsticks, all roam the world, looking for the aforementioned "artifacts", but also trying to stop those that would with hold those wonders from the rest of us (ever wonder what the Fantastic Four would really be like--once again, look, if you dare).

CROSSING WORLDS takes the reader on a wild ride through adjacent realities where the Planetary team encounter--in order--The Authority (one of PLANETARY's sister team magazines in the WILDSTORM line), a version of the JUSTICE LEAGUE (of DC COMICS fame) and, last but not least, BATMAN (no other intro needed).
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20 of 29 people found the following review helpful By N. Foong on September 7, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Planetary: Crossing Worlds is a woefully inconsistent collection of stories that feature crossovers with The Authority, JLA and Batman. There are three self contained stories presented here, and all fall short of anything we have seen in the ongoing Planetary series which is arguably the best work by writer Warren Ellis to date. In his regular series, Ellis manages to stimulate our imagination with over-the-top but fully realised ideas that are an exhilarating blend of pseudo-science and pulpy, nostalgic treasures of days gone by. In contrast, Planetary:Crossing Worlds feels incomplete. It lacks the cleverness and spectacle that has pushed this title's namesake into comic book greatness. Little if anything is added by way of character development and the disjointed story telling will put off all but the most hard core Ellis fans.

In the first story (Planetary/Authority: Ruling the World) Phil Jimenez lends his detailed pencils to what should have been a classic encounter between Ellis's two best creations. Instead we are presented with an `alien fish' invasion story that fails to rise above mediocre. If you were anticipating interaction and dialogue between the two teams you will be sorely disappointed. There is a brief flashback `encounter' from 1939 between Elijah Snow and Jenny Sparks but little else is on offer by way of a `crossover.'

The second story (Planetary/JLA: Terra Occulta) is even less satisfying and ends up a confusing mess. Featuring serviceable if unspectacular artwork by Jerry Ordway this story is set in an alternate Earth where an evil Planetary rule the world and the only ones that can stop them are Diana, Bruce and Clark. Little respect is shown for any of the characters here and the reader is given little reason to care for where this story takes us.
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Format: Paperback
Three brilliant novellas (as Warren Ellis himself would call them himself) featuring a team of super-powered self-called archeolgists of the hidden secret history of the 20th century. Creaed almost at the same time as The Authority, Planetary is the second of the books that closed a decade and a century of superhero comics. While The Authority propelled them into the future, launching them into the realm of widescreen movie-like action, Planetary is a summa of what has been and could have been, the genre's swan song and a love sing to it and its many facets and authors.
The three tales told here are not really mcuh more than a divrtissement, but if it truly is so, then we need more authors having this fun.
The opener is actually the lightest and easiest, bringing The Authority and Planetary together to fight a common, ancient menace from the Bleed (the connecting tissue in which the multiple universes "are", in a way). Fun fact: The two teams team-up without actually meeting and eventually shutting up the bad guys. Aside from the Lovecraft quotes (and the funny cameo of the writer himself), the book pits two different visions of superheroism against each other, wonderng wha would happen if almighty heroes who took it upon themselves to put things right ever lost their unflinching moral compass.
The second tale is what would have been an "elseworlds" tale in the Nineties: An alternative view of DC Comics' heroes. In this case, Batman, Wonder Woman and Superman nver were, because the Planetary foundation (their turn to go bad) turned from researchers to hoarders and control-freaks, killing all of the planet's heroes before they even started.
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