Plastic Fang

April 9, 2002 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
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Popularity  
30
1
3:15
30
2
4:17
30
3
3:01
30
4
4:34
30
5
3:47
30
6
4:54
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4:26
30
8
2:52
30
9
3:50
30
10
4:30
30
11
4:26
30
12
4:28
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 9, 2002
  • Release Date: April 9, 2002
  • Label: Matador
  • Copyright: 2002 Matador Records
  • Total Length: 48:20
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000XEEN0Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #151,899 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By "burquhart1" on April 25, 2002
Format: Audio CD
The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion has charted a crooked course since the release of its debut album in 1992. Courting controversy, the band played with genres like a six-year-old playing dress-up, trying on a mishmash of styles and to hell with the consequences. The result was a postmodern pastiche of punk, blues, soul and hip hop, starting with the gutter rockabilly of Crypt Style and ending with the funk collage of Acme.
With the release of Plastic Fang, the Explosion's sixth proper album, this postmodern brew has been usurped by the straightforward, put on hiatus like a low-rated TV show. The loops and electronic squiggles of Acme have been shelved, and the Explosion has released a bona fide rock 'n' roll album. Taking its cues from songs like "Wait a Minute" and "Chowder" - released on the Explosion's odds and sods collection Xtra-Acme - the new album has more in common with the Rolling Stones than the band's early noise.
For the Blues Explosion, the blues have always been more about attitude than genre - it was the sweat, not the gutbucket guitar. Like the band's 1996 release Now I Got Worry, the Explosion do sound a little more like a blues band on this record, albeit in the way the Yardbirds or Cream sounded like a blues band. The Explosion - Spencer, second guitarist Judah Bauer and drummer Russel Simins - kick out the jams on Plastic Fang. These boys sound serious.
"She Said," the album's first single, borrows a well-thumbed page from The Cramps' songbook, with Spencer recounting the midnight travails of some tormented wolfman. Bauer and Spencer lay the foundation, hammering out some bottom-heavy licks on guitar, while Simins keeps it steady with his piston-like drumming.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Chris 444 Lockhart on April 18, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is an excellent rock album that falls perfectly into Jon Spencer's musical progression. Fans of early Blues Explosion may not find what they are looking for, but they probably did not enjoy the previous album or two either. (...) As each album from Jon and crew has been more focused musically than the one previous, this album is their most focused offering yet. Apparently, they took these songs on the road before recording the album. While some of the spontaneous feeling is lost, so much more is gained in quality.
Lyrically, this is the most advanced work Jon has done, to the best of my knowledge. This is a conceptual album hidden slightly among typical Blues Explosion puncuation. While the video for 'She Said', and album cover and title push the werewolf theme forward, a closer listen makes it apparent that the werewolf theme is only a motif, or metaphor in this case. The story is told in chronological order, across the majority of the twelve tracks. And the tale told is a story of infidelity, guilt, sin, and loss of love.
I have been listening to the Blues Explosion since 1996, and am not a so-called newcomer. I have all of their albums and enjoy them all. However, 'Plastic Fang' and 'Acme' are the only Blues Explosion albums that I will play all the way through without skipping any tracks. This album has suffered from poor reviews, mostly from those who only listened to the album once, and did so trying to hear 'Extra Width' and being disappointed that they did not do so. Make no mistake, this is the same Blues Explosion.. however, they have progressed past that point.
If you are new to the Blues Explosion, this, or 'Acme' would be a great place to start. If you are a long time Jon Spencer fan, listen to this album with an open mind.. and you may find that you actually enjoy it in its own right. In summary, this is a great album, and I highly recommend it.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Blahblahblah on April 24, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Before getting to the music itself I'll explain what you get with the limited edition: fancy packaging, nothing more. This is part of an unfortunate trend with recent music publishing: failing to offer the fans anything more than a new gimmick. There isn't one single extra track. But to be honest, I am the type of [person] who goes for creative packaging the marketers must love. In keeping with the album's theme (songs about vampires and werewolves) Chip Kidd has designed a booklet filled with images from 1970s horror magazines (artwork by Estaban Marato, etc.), including an add for plastic fangs. The limited edition cd, instead of coming in a jewel case, is packaged in a cardboard sleeve (with a funny scene drawn by Wally Wood not in the regular ed.) which, along with the regular booklet, is packed inside a plastic baggie with a cardboard hanger (much like the packaging novelty items such as plastic fangs are usually found in). Pretty cool, but not great for storage.
As to the album's substance: Jon Spencer and co. don't always put out great albums, but at least they are always good. This is one of the merely "good" ones. As usual, the songs are much better than anything you'll find on mainstream radio and they will definitely keep you awake, but there is nothing particularly inventive about any of them. In fact, they are more like a throwback to the sort of country and blues inspired rock you could find on the radio decades ago than a return to Spencer's earlier albums. In other words by "returning to roots", he must be referring to those who originally inspired him, vs. "Orange" or "Extra Width" (or Boss Hog, etc).
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