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Plato's Late Ontology: A Riddle Resolved; with a new Introduction, and the Essay "Excess and Deficiency at Statesman 283C-285C" Paperback – December 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 360 pages
  • Publisher: Parmenides Publishing; Revised edition (December 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1930972091
  • ISBN-13: 978-1930972094
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,500,412 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

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"Many theories have been produced to explain Aristotle's account of Plato's teaching, because that account seemed to bear little resemblance to the extant dialogues. Sayre persuasively resolves the riddle by offering an analysis of the later dialogues matching the Aristotelian report point by point. Arguing carefully and keeping close to the texts, Sayre has produced an original interpretation that no future reading of Plato can ignore. Frederick J. Crosson University of Notre Dame"

About the Author

Kenneth M Sayre is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame.

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Giuseppe Tulli on February 2, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The origin of "Western intelligence" is deeply rooted in the joint event of the appearance of BOTH mathematics and philosophy in Ancient Greece. For philosophy as such, as it originated in Greece, is not fully intelligible without a serious knowledge of Greek mathematics and, viceversa.

I myself had reached this conclusion by perceiving the link while studying Euclid. One book that really helped me to understand the philosophical background of Greek mathematics(or viceversa) is Arpad Szabo's "The Beginnings of Greek Mathematics". In this book, one could say, mathematics is stated to have originated with Parmenides and the Eleatics, who, as we know, were crucial for the development of Greek Philosophy. Thus ontological and mathematical problems became embedded "ab origine", as two complementary faces of an indivisible unit. Problem is that in our tradition, philosophy and mathematics are conceived and studied separately. This Book is unique in this respect, AFAIK, in clarifying this relationship by specifically analyzing Plato's Parmenides and Philebus, even through a very careful reading of Aristotle's reference to Plato's philosophy in section 6, book I of the Metaphysics. Professor Sayre's presentation of the structure of Plato's Parmenides is the clearest that I know, and for just this I would give it 5 stars.

So even if the "riddle" is not, and cannot, be fully resolved, this is a work that masterfully helps to put many of the pieces together.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By VeritasluxMea on August 26, 2012
Format: Paperback
Im shocked this book doesnt have more reviews, its actually a rather famous secret sourcebook for Platonists and researchers. This is yet another "among 20 books" that is an absolute necessity to own and read (and reread).
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