Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Playing Beatie Bow Paperback – May 1, 2001


See all 22 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, May 1, 2001
$96.33 $0.72
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 188 pages
  • Publisher: Barn Owl Books, London (May 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1903015111
  • ISBN-13: 978-1903015117
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 4.8 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,175,371 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ruth Park was born in New Zealand and spent most of her life in Australia. She was born in 1922 in Auckland, and later moved to Te Kuiti in the north of the country with her parents. Ruth Park won the Miles Franklin Award for Swords and Crowns and Rings (1977), the Boston Globe Award for Playing Beatie Bow (1980), and was awarded the 1993 Lloyd O'Neil Magpie Award for services to the Australian book industry.

From AudioFile

At last, this perfectly crafted time-travel novel has found its way onto audio for a new generation of children to enjoy! When Abigail Kirk, an odd misfit of a girl from Sydney, Australia, sews a scrap of lovely lace into the yoke of her handmade Victorian style dress, she cannot guess what it will mean for her. After she and her young friend, Natalie, observe a group of children playing a game called Beatie Bow, Abigail is transported to Victorian England in 1873, where she is acknowledged by the Bow family to be the long-awaited "stranger." Cate Milte's reading is marvelously evocative. She captures Granny's Orkney brogue and bountiful wisdom, Judah's sweet generosity, Dovey's unrelenting kindness, Mr. Bow's befuddled kindness, Gibby's incessant death-obsessed whining, and Beatie's sassy gruffness. The mystery of intricately connected events takes shape under Milte's careful reading and will make this a favorite recording of middle-grade and young adult listeners. T.B. (c) AudioFile 2000, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

If you enjoy scrappy female characters and imperfect people this story is for you.
turtleXings
For those of us who are avid readers, the book is just a delight, both in terms of language and plot.
Owen Hughes
I read this back in year six, and it was for English class so I was understandably hesitant.
Dee18

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Laraine A. Barker on June 28, 2005
Format: Paperback
Young Abigail is a fairly typical teenager--blind to the needs of her mother that seem to run contrary to her own needs, and yet concerned enough over the frazzled, tired look on the face of the woman next door to take the neighbour's children, Natalie and Vincent, off her hands for a while. They go to the park where other children are playing a game they call Beatie Bow. Both Natalie and Abigail are very taken by a strange girl that Natalie calls "the little furry girl", who is closely watching the game. But the little girl flees, squawking, when they talk to her. Later, wearing a dress she has made from some Victorian crochet lace, Abigail sees the little furry girl again. When the child flees from her she follows--to soon find herself in streets she no longer recognises.

Young readers might find this time-slip novel a little slow to start, even for a book published in the 1980s, but if they persist they will soon find themselves in a thoroughly absorbing, and often terrifying, tale. While it might have surprised Abigail that the undersized, illiterate girl who was always screeching "I'll punch ye yeller and green!" became someone of considerable importance, I doubt young readers will be surprised. Beatie Bow is a thoroughly unforgettable character and Ruth Park's prose is always a joy to read.

It made me sad to see the reviews here posted by students who were forced to "study" the book at school. This is a serious disservice to everyone concerned because all it's likely to do is turn young people against reading. Fiction should be for fun not for study.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 21, 1998
Format: Paperback
Playing Beatie Bow is a book which recognises the inherent childish qualities of 14 year olds, and how time and experiences can turn teenage girls into wonderful adults. It looks at life through many eyes, and at the changes which society has made - both for better and for worse - in the past 150 years. Reading this book has been an annual event for me for 14 years, and I am only 25. I can thoroughly recommend a book which will have you smelling and hearing "The Rocks" in Sydney well before the Harbour Bridge and the Opera House were even physically possible!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 2, 1998
Format: Paperback
Playing Beatie Bow was an interesting book because of the extensive historical content and because it told the story of a young girl growing up. I enjoyed reading in the Victorian dialect and seeing the cultural differences between modern times and Victorian times. I especially liked seeing everything from Abby's point of view because she is a girl my age who has some of the same feelings I do. It was a good book and I enjoyed reading it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 9, 1999
Format: Paperback
I got this book a few years ago. It was actually in a box marked 'discarded' since a family member brought it home from a library that was cleaning out their stocks. I was bored and finally decided to turn the pages. I couldn't stop because it was so interesting. History, adventure and a bit of romance all in one. Beatie and all characters were excellent. I read it every summer and count it as one of my favorites.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on September 20, 2002
Format: Paperback
Okay, I'm not actually under thirteen (I am 13) but anyway....
This book is beautiful. It's evocative, passionate and has an elusive, mysterious aura about it. The characters are all loved by Ruth Park, even the obnoxious Beatie and the hypochondriac, Gibbie.
I loved the way Abigail was so independant, and so strong. I completely fell in love with Judah and I don't think Robert will replace him- not for Abigail or me, actually.
Ruth Park is a fantastic author so I would recommend other books by her, particularly the Harp in the South- a look at suburban Sydney in the 1940's.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Maryanne Hughes on February 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
I have loved this book since I first read it when it came out, and I was 19. I laughed, cried, and loved along with Abby, whose character I understood so well. When I finally got to visit the Rocks on a trip to Australia, I delighted in seeking out the places mentioned in the book, but alas, no Mitchell Tower, and it was all so clean! It is a pity that as a set text, school kids are forced to read Playing Beatie Bow, as it takes away the magic of discovering the book for themselves. It will always be one of my favourite books, right up there with Jane Austen, and I recommend it to women of every age who ever felt like a misfit, fell in love too young, or dreamt of being born 100 years ago.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
My best friend in Seattle gave this to me before I left for Manila to study. I was 13. I used to live in Australia and have an enormous love for fairies and anything old, so I immediately gobbled up the story. And you see how young, cynical Abigail changes into a young woman wise beyond her years, all in the span of a few months! At 22 I still love it, but I sorely want a new copy to replace my tattered one!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Owen Hughes on June 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
It's no surprise that Ruth Park is the author of such a good book. This prolific Australian writer has well and truly earned her place in the pantheon of fine Aussie writers. "Playing Beatie Bow," although it won the 1981 Australian Children's Book of the Year Award, is a story that will be appreciated by people of all ages, except those under ten perhaps. The book has a number of levels, all relatively complex, and uses slang terms and local expressions to some extent, that will leave some non-Australian readers occasionally perplexed. In fact, it will be a somewhat difficult text for the early high school years as well, but the story is so intriguing that most readers will be pleased to muddle through any difficulties.

For those of us who are avid readers, the book is just a delight, both in terms of language and plot. In addition, the story takes place in the old part of Sydney and gives us some fascinating insight into the Rocks area, both past and present. I won't say anything about the storyline - just get ready for some very nicely wrought twists and turns.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search