• List Price: $31.95
  • Save: $15.09 (47%)
Rented from RentU
To Rent, select Shipping State from options above
Due Date: Aug 17, 2015
FREE return shipping at the end of the semester. Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with rentals.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Fast shipping from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $35. Overnight, 2 day and International shipping available! Excellent Customer Service.. May not include supplements such as CD, access code or DVD.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Qty:1
  • List Price: $31.95
  • Save: $3.48 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Playing the Race Card: Me... has been added to your Cart
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Playing the Race Card: Melodramas of Black and White from Uncle Tom to O. J. Simpson Paperback – September 23, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-0691102832 ISBN-10: 069110283X Edition: New Ed

Buy New
Price: $28.47
Rent
Price: $16.86
25 New from $10.00 22 Used from $13.71
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$28.47
$10.00 $13.71
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Calendar of Loss by Dagmawi Woubshet
The Calendar of Loss by Dagmawi Woubshet
This innovative and moving study illuminates how AIDS mourners—particularly in 1980s Ethiopia—grappled with the death of lovers and friends. Learn more | See similar books
$28.47 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Playing the Race Card: Melodramas of Black and White from Uncle Tom to O. J. Simpson + All Shook Up: How Rock 'n' Roll Changed America (Pivotal Moments in American History)
Price for both: $44.39

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Melodramas of Black and White from Uncle Tom to O.J. Simpson
  • Paperback: 424 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; New Ed edition (September 23, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 069110283X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691102832
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,122,241 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

It seems like a long leap "from Lillian Gish to... Leonardo DiCaprio and from Uncle Tom to Rodney King," but in this dazzling, benchmark work, noted cultural historian and critic Williams makes it with panache and enormous insight. Investigating contemporary racial strife embodied in the Rodney King and O.J. Simpson trials, Williams (Hard Core: Power, Pleasure, and the Frenzy of the Visible) argues that centuries-old racial and sexual myths and representations are central to U.S. culture and politics. Exploring with acuity and empathy the many permutations of racial stereotypes (e.g., the black sexual predator and the white female victim in Birth of a Nation and elsewhere, and their social and political meanings over the past 150 years), Williams navigates a maze of American popular culture from Uncle Tom's Cabin, The Jazz Singer and Show Boat to Roots and Bill T. Jones's Last Supper at Uncle Tom's Cabin. Always provocative, Williams eschews simple explanations and easy liberal or conservative platitudesas in her complicated analysis of the relationship between Jewish assimilation and blackface in The Jazz Singer and of the marketing for Gone with the Wind in Southern states (at age 10, Martin Luther King Jr. performed as a "slave" at a gala celebration of the film). Williams's astounding range of sources and attendant critical literature (she is professor of film studies at UC-Berkeley) is as impressive as her ability to synthesize and interpret so much information without undermining its emotional and artistic impact. This is a vital contribution to American studies as well as film and race studies. Photos and illus.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Williams (film studies, Univ. of California, Berkeley Hard Core) attempts to understand the racial sympathies and hostilities that surfaced during the "trials in black and white" (i.e., the police beating of Rodney King and O.J. Simpson's murder trial) by analyzing the mass culture genealogy of racial melodramas since the mid-19th century. She defines melodrama as "the fundamental mode by which American mass culture has 'talked to itself' about the enduring moral dilemma of race." By examining a variety of melodramas, including novels (Uncle Tom's Cabin), films (The Birth of a Nation), plays (Tommer Shows), Broadway musicals (The Jazz Singer), and TV dramas (Roots), Williams unfolds the "Tom/anti-Tom" dialectic, exposes the logic of race- and gender-based victimization, and shows how both white and black have maneuvered the race card to great moral advantages. "Playing the race card" is simply part and parcel of the racial power games in U.S. culture. For any honest discussion about race relations in America, she argues, we must first acknowledge the indeterminate influence of melodrama. Conscientiously researched, with extensive notes and bibliography, this insightful book is essential for academic libraries and students in film studies. Edward G. McCormack, Univ. of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast Lib., Long Beach
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Futoshi J. Tomori on July 5, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is Film Studies of the first order. Williams takes the idea of melodrama as a mode and intersects it with issues of race and its representation. According to her, in conjuction with the popularity or in the legitimization of a particular medium in American society, the representations of the black male and female bodies take on center stage and gain new significations. The book starts out with Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin" and shows how it stays and strays away from the conventions of the Victorian novel. It then focuses on the Stowe's characterization of the black bodies and how they elicited the sympathy of the readers. Next, it shows how Dixon, with his novel "The Clansmen,' either changes or reverses Stowe's characterizations and themes to elicit another kind of response. However, it is D.W. Griffith's adaptation of the novel, "Birth of the Nation" that had a powerful influence in the society's imagination. Not only did the film legitimize the medium as an art form, it also gave the public a new way of understanding race relations in America. The book covers both the novel and the movie adaptation of "Gone With the Wind" and other cultural texts and ends with the televised trial of O.J. Simpson while keeping on the other eye issues of representation. Linda Williams' project is both multi-disciplinary and multi-media and she weaves them together in a rich study of melodrama as a cultural mode and the ever evolving nature of race relations and representations in our society. She wittily uses Henry James' imagery of the 'leaping fish' to show how melodrama dynamically moves from one medium to the next. Each time it makes an appearance in a big way, it also entails a recasting of black and white or racial representations.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By The Moviegoer on September 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the greatest books I have ever read. I'm somewhat interested in film studies but more so interested in race and I found this analysis of the melodramatic depictions of race across the mediums of stage, film, and trials to be very enlightening. One of the greatest things about Linda Williams is that she does not condemn or overpraise. She analyzes everything dialectically. While one might abhor, for instance, blackface minstrelsy that denigrated African Americans, Linda Williams makes the point that it was first through blackface that whites gained a sense of the humanity of blacks, all the while making fun of them.

The style of the book is readable. Linda Williams is an intellectual but she manages to make her work accessible to those who have not studied film academically. Familiarity with the concept of modernism would help with the first chapter, but is not necessary. If you have studied Morrison, Fanon, Nietzsche, Benjamin and the other thinkers Linda Williams makes brief references to, you will probably get a richer understanding of this book. However, speaking for someone who is only moderately familiar with those intellectuals, I nevertheless gained a deep understanding of the book. Linda Williams is a very competent writer.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Playing the Race Card: Melodramas of Black and White from Uncle Tom to O. J. Simpson
This item: Playing the Race Card: Melodramas of Black and White from Uncle Tom to O. J. Simpson
Price: $28.47
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com