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  • Please Please Me (1990)
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Please Please Me (1990)


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Audio CD, October 25, 1990
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"The story began in Harold Macmillan’s “never had it so good” ’50s Britain. It should be fiction: four teenagers with no more than eight O’Levels between them, running and biking and busing and busking all over Liverpool in search of new chords and old guitars and half-decent drum kit and any gig at all.
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Capitol
  • ASIN: B000002UA9
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (351 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #87,520 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. I Saw Her Standing There
2. Misery
3. Anna (Go To Him)
4. Chains
5. Boys
6. Ask Me Why
7. Please Please Me
8. Love Me Do
9. P.S. I Love You
10. Baby It's You
11. Do You Want To Know A Secret
12. A Taste Of Honey
13. There's A Place
14. Twist And Shout

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

(1963/EMI) 14 tracksMedium 1
  1. I Saw Her Standing There
  2. Misery
  3. Anna (Go To Him)
  4. Chains
  5. Boys
  6. Ask Me Why
  7. Please Please Me
  8. Love Me Do
  9. P.S. I Love You
  10. Baby It's You
  11. Do You Want To Know A Secret
  12. A Taste Of Honey
  13. There's A Place
  14. Twist And Shout

Amazon.com

Their first-ever album, raw and rough and still very rock & roll. Lennon and McCartney begin to flex their writing muscles and had already scored two UK hits when this appeared, but they still relied heavily on the cover material to see them through. Their insecurity about their own abilities seems curious in hindsight since they'd pulled the title song and "I Saw Her Standing There" (with thanks to Little Richard) out of their hats. But they were an unknown quantity, still to launch a million bands and take pop music to places it had never dreamed off. A small step for four men, a giant leap for music. --Chris Nickson

Customer Reviews

Great songs included here: "When I Saw Her Standing There", "Boys", "Please Please Me", "Love Me Do" & "Twist and Shout".
Harry Brewer
This is not the best place to begin a Beatles collection but it is a great album in its own way and is required listening for all true Beatles fans.
Peter Durward Harris
"I saw her standing there"- everyone should know this song, this is a good rockin song, great way to kick off the album.
Scott

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

67 of 71 people found the following review helpful By blue-59 on September 14, 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
There's only so much that audio engineers can do with material that was frankly rather sloppily recorded four and a half decades ago. Back in the 1970s, I owned a high-end audio store, and as familiar as I was with the Beatles' U.S. releases, I still purchased all the Beatles LPs on British Parlophone anticipating the "real thing." However, none of those LPs, including this album, were anything great in terms of fidelity. The sound was generally thin, brittle, weak, and lacking in detail. The U.S. versions, with all their weaknesses, were better. But keep in mind that high-quality audio systems were very rare in 1962, and the engineers did the mastering, equalization, etc., with "record players," not audio systems, in mind. It should not be surprising that the early Beatles' recordings didn't hold up so well on top-quality audio equipment.

Whatever else they have done to their manufacturing capability over the past few decades, the British have remained extremely important in terms of audio engineering. Bowers & Wilkins 801s are still damn fine speakers a quarter century after they first appeared. The British masterings of Frank Sinatra's 1950s output simply blow away the American versions. While the American engineers worried about removing hiss, the British engineers went after capturing the music, the comparison to modern digital recording be damned.

What the engineers have done with this album, and I assume the others, is dig as deep as they could into the master tapes and get us as close to the music as possible. Beware that this is not as close as possible to the sound that we heard from our GE or RCA portables. It is what we wish they could have sounded like back then. It is the Beatles reworked for the modern age and, to my mind, very successfully.
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127 of 139 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Hamlow HALL OF FAME on April 21, 2002
Format: Audio CD
With "A 1,2,3,4," history was made with the rousing opening number, "I Saw Her Standing There" from Please Please Me, the debut album of the best group the world has had the pleasure to experience.
"Misery" has the rhythm guitar that became part of the Beatles' signature style. At least in the early days. I wonder if Helen Shapiro set fire to her coiffure after turning this great number down--it was originally offered to her.
"Anna (Go To Him)" is an archetypal 60's type ballad originally done by R&B singer Arthur Alexander. Beatles renditions of other Alexander songs appear on the Live At The BBC album.
Their rendition of the Cookies' "Chains" shows they do justice to the works one of America's best songwriters, Carole King and Louise Goffin.
"Boys" is classic rollicking rock and roll and sung by Ringo, and one of two Shirelles numbers done here--the other is the slow and languid "Baby It's You," the song beginning with "Sha la la la la la la."
The centerpiece of this album is the title track, which became the Beatles' first #1 hit on the British charts--it only reached #3 in the U.S. Anyone who wonders why the Beatles made it big need only hear this song. Love that harmonica inbetween the verses!
The "Love Me Do" version here is not the originally recorded single version which reached #17 on the British charts and #1 on the Billboard Singles Chart. Rather, this has Andy White on drums while Ringo is relegated to tapping a tambourine. For the version that hit the single charts, get Past Masters Volume I. I like both versions all the same.
"P.S.
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52 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Steve Vrana HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on October 27, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This was the album that thrust the Beatles into the spotlight in England. [It would be almost another year before America would embrace the lads from Liverpool.] After honing their skills in Hamburg and gigging around England, they shot to No. 1 in the U.K. with "Please Please Me" and followed up with this LP.
Eight of these songs are Lennon-McCartney originals, the rest were taken from their live show repertoire. Of the former, "I Saw Her Standing There" is a terrific Little Richard-inspired rocker and "Love Me Do" (their first U.K. single) features some wonderful harmonica by Lennon. Of the latter, Lennon turns in a fine performance on Arthur Alexander's "Anna" and the definitive version of "Twist and Shout"--two minutes and thirty-three seconds of primal rock 'n' roll. [And all done with two guitars, a bass and a drum kit! When was the last time you heard music like THAT on the radio?]
This was the Beatles at their most innocent and arguably their most enthusiastic. This album belongs in any serious music fan's collection. ESSENTIAL
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Dean Martin Dent on February 12, 2000
Format: Audio CD
After two hit singles(Love Me Do & Please,Please Me which eventually became the albums title track) an album was inevitible.But since The Beatles didn't have the clout for even a budget sized production,this album was recorded in one day.In these days of artist spending millions,and taking years to complete an album,PPM is amazing in the fact that they practically banged this one out and 37 years later dispite many rough edges,it still sounds fresh.Another amazing facet was that 60% of the album was self composed,especially at a time when musical acts recorded other writers songs suggested by their producer.This was essentially their stage show in the studio,where they even topped it off with their no holds barred performance of Twist & Shout.The originals(especially I Saw Her Standing There,Ask Me Why,PS I Love You,& Do You Want To Know A Secret) follow up on the precedent that the two aforementioned lead singles had set.The cover songs aren't no slouches either(the sweet Anna,Boys,A Taste Of Honey and of course Twist & Shout).Some of todays mainstream music listeners may be put of by the rough edges,flubbed notes and shaky vocals,but its those flaws that give PPM its charm.
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Love Me Do in Please Please Me LP and Past Masters
Standard procedure at Abbey Road Studios at the time was to erase the original two-track session tape once it had been "mixed down" to the master tape used to press records. However, at some point the mixdown master tape for this song was also lost, and apparently no backup copies had... Read More
Oct 5, 2009 by Ryan |  See all 3 posts
Please Please Me - First Album??
Please Please Me was their first album in Britain for EMI records. Meet the Beatles was the first Capitol Album in the US. It took some cuts from the Please Please Me album and their single I Want To Hold Your Hand. It was released almost a year after Please Please Me. SO actually Please Please... Read More
Sep 5, 2009 by Ahab345 |  See all 6 posts
Please Please Me (Remastered stereo) 1:44 to 1:52
This 'distortion' was really an attempt to fatten up the take used to end the stereo mix by syncing another take to the recording - a very difficult thing to due with the technology of the time. What you should be more surprised to hear in the stereo mix (if all you are used to is mono) is the... Read More
Sep 11, 2009 by Keith Paynter |  See all 4 posts
This Boy?
You can find it on "Past Masters".
Oct 10, 2010 by Pamela McNeill |  See all 2 posts
Please Please Me - available in Mono individually?
The only remastered Beatles CDs that will be sold individually are the stereo versions. If you want the mono versions, you must buy the Beatles in Mono boxed set.
Sep 9, 2009 by bjoecool |  See all 5 posts
Happy 50th Be the first to reply
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