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Ploughman's Lunch and the Miser's Feast: Authentic Pub Food, Restaurant Fare, and Home Cooking from Small Towns, Big Cities, and Country Villages Across the British Isles Hardcover – February 14, 2012


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Ploughman's Lunch and the Miser's Feast: Authentic Pub Food, Restaurant Fare, and Home Cooking from Small Towns, Big Cities, and Country Villages Across the British Isles + Great British Cooking: A Well-kept Secret
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Common Press; 1st Edition edition (February 14, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558324135
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558324138
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 9.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #85,963 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

A Letter to Readers from Brian Yarvin

Dear Amazon readers,

I always love the underdog and British food has such a bad reputation that I couldn't help but be drawn to it. Soon it became my special culinary place--an unknown spot where nobody else went. I would have thought that the popularity of The Two Fat Ladies, Nigella Lawson, Jamie Oliver, and Gordon Ramsay would have done something--yet, the joy of a B&B breakfast, a Sunday pub lunch, a great curry, or a lavish tea service remains something of a cult secret.

So much of British food is a poor man's vision of a rich man's meal: breakfast with sausages AND bacon or a big Sunday lunch of roast beef and Yorkshire pudding. And even more has always been and always will be a "poor man's meal:" fried bread, dumplings and mince, or bubble and squeak.

When you travel to Britain, nobody gives you any advance notice that there are foods worth eating outside of a few fine-dining temples, and on my first trips, everything seemed new. The surprises never stopped coming: sandwiches, artisan cheeses, cereals and beverages of the highest quality, and the obvious: these legendary gardeners grew more than flowers--this very green place is paradise for produce fans.

The United Kingdom is like a Chinese restaurant with a secret menu--learn what's good, find out what to order, and you'll be among the initiated. Let everybody else suffer with kabobs or frozen pizzas; we can go on a journey. I'll share a secret with you and take you along a gastronomic path that isn't anywhere as heavily traveled as it should be. You'll love it--I promise.

Brian Yarvin

Sample Recipe from The Ploughman's Lunch and the Miser's Feast: Chicken and Leek Casserole


Makes 4 servings

Chicken and leeks seem to be an inspired combination, in Great Britain as elsewhere. Here we make that cousin to a chicken pie, a chicken casserole. You can also find the pair in a soup, Cock-A-Leekie.

1/4 cup chopped bacon
1 pound boneless chicken breast or thigh meat, cut in 1/2-inch pieces
2 cups chopped leeks, white parts only
1 cup chopped carrot
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1 cup beer or ale
1/4 cup dry breadcrumbs

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Combine the bacon, chicken, leeks, carrot, salt, pepper, broth, and beer or ale in a Dutch oven or casserole and mix well so that the ingredients are evenly distributed.

Bake the casserole, covered, until the chicken is fully cooked, about 60 minutes.

Remove the cover, return the casserole to the oven, and bake until about 1/3 of the liquid has evaporated, about 30 minutes more.

Sprinkle the breadcrumbs on top and return the casserole to the oven. Bake, uncovered, until the breadcrumbs are nicely browned, about 30 minutes more. Serve warm.


About the Author

Brian Yarvin, a native New Yorker, has been a photographer for almost 35 years. He is an instructor of food and commercial photography at the Washington School of Photography in Bethesda, Maryland. He is also a food writer and restaurant reviewer. He lives in Edison, New Jersey.

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Customer Reviews

I love the history and stories of the author's travels.
Sandie
The book to me is well worth reading its nice to see someone present British Fare as it is., good and bad food is everywhere in any country.
Ms Jean E Martin
As Brian Yarvin explains, British food, despite its reputation, can be good.
wogan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Terri Pena on March 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Ploughman's Lunch and the Miser's Feast is fantastic! History, local producers, explanations for the odd food names, and recipes galore. When I picked up this book I had no idea there was such a variety of British food out there. Not just British food, but good British food. I know what you are thinking, that British and good food do not belong in the same sentence, until last week I would have agreed with you. Most of what we know about British food is not at all flattering, but the things that have been imported here are only half the picture. I am learning that the base foods are fairly bland, but it is the sauces and condiments that make them shine. The sauces and condiments have not made the trip across the ocean and so we were left thinking ALL British food is bland. Here is an entire book of recipes to show us how wrong we have been.

I am aware of the Ploughman's Lunch only because Husband spends a good amount of time in brew pubs and a variation of that dish can be found everywhere. Miser's Feast? What could it be? It is a dish of potatoes, onions, and british bacon or thinly sliced pork chops cooked long and slow. Like a scalloped potato without the cream, but with onions and pork. MMMM

The photo on the cover also comes from a long slow cook, Banoffee Pie. The base is made by baking sweetened condensed milk in a water bath for two hours. I have read old American recipes using this method to bake the milk right in the cans, but the Banoffee Pie is so much more.

The book contains lots of history about the region and it's food. There are enteries for people producing the good stuff locally, and every recipe begins with a bit about the dish. Sometimes it is explaining an odd name or unexpected ingredient.
Read more ›
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By wogan TOP 100 REVIEWER on April 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover
As Brian Yarvin explains, British food, despite its reputation, can be good. This, however is the old-fashioned good food of Britain, that one might have grown up with, or if you were lucky enough in visits to England that you found out and about in authentic (good) pubs.
I must make the confession that when I lived in Britain. I loved pub food and especially ploughman's lunches and steak and kidney pies. This book has met my expectations; in fact looking through the recipes and pictures and explanations, such as those on an English breakfast could bring me to tears of enjoyable reminiscences. The pictures showing some of the countryside and pubs are well done and even though the pictures of food preparation are not quite ones that give directions, they give much help in the recipe preparation.

It might take a dyed in the wool Anglophile to long for Gentleman's Relish and scotch eggs, but to actually find decent recipes for them is amazing. There are about 100 recipes in this book, including; full breakfast, sandwiches, salads and small plates, soup, main course, curry, sides, savory pies and baked goods, sweets and recipes for what you might need such as, lemon curd and clotted cream. A measurement conversion chart is included (recipes are given in `American' measurements), there is a translation guide- a glossary that tells you what fish fingers, candy floss and baps are. The index can be a bit confusing. If you want to look up Steak and Kidney pie, it is not listed alphabetical but in with the pies.

This includes the best recipe and least confusing directions to make Yorkshire pudding I have seen; and of course we have enjoyed the steak and kidney pie, the scotch eggs, the pickled eggs, bubble and squeak and so many others in here.
This is a book for Anglophiles, cookbook collectors and those who would like to try some wholesome and different food, even if you haven't been lucky enough to find that pub that still makes these wonderful dishes.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Caroline E Evans on December 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a lovely read, and the recipes are delicious and easy to follow- if you can get the ingredients. As an expatriate English person lving in the southern states, I can tell you that this book has cause much joy, amusement and some consternation amongst my neighbours who have absolutely no idea how to get hold of things like organic heavy cream and beef suet. Otherwise, it's a lovely book to read and to give. Some other very minor points- some of the history and lore expressed in this book is very debateable, and why on earth Mr Yarvin had so much trouble finding oatcakes is quite beyond me. So please use the proverbial grain of salt whilst contemplating the origin of Hindle Wakes, and don't assume that his recipe for Welsh rarebit is any more authentic than Jamie Oliver's. But do buy the book, and do try out the recipes!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ms Jean E Martin on February 8, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is worth having, but some things were not as I remember growing up in the UK.
Fat Rascals for example are a regional specialty known well in the county of Yorkshire.
Caster sugar is not confectioners sugar, it is a superfine sugar. used often in making meringues, and dusting sponge cakes, or pies, confectioners sugar. is known as "icing sugar" Small points. The book to me is well worth reading its nice to see someone present British Fare as it is., good and bad food is everywhere in any country. and its time to enjoy what the UK has to offer. maybe this book will help to do that. I loved the pictures .
Leedstyke@aol.com
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sandie on April 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've been expanding my collection of unusual, or "special," cookbooks to fill the new bookshelves in my kitchen. I found this title while browsing on Amazon, and I've been to the UK, so I ordered it. It's a delightful book! I love the history and stories of the author's travels. I've already made the Staffordshire oatcakes, the mushy peas (better than you'd think!) and the tofu curry (outstanding!). I'm glad I bought this book...now I want to return to England!
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