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Plunder of the Sun (Special Collector's Edition) (1953)

Glenn Ford , Diana Lynn , John Farrow  |  NR |  DVD
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)

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Product Details

  • Actors: Glenn Ford, Diana Lynn, Patricia Medina, Francis L. Sullivan, Sean McClory
  • Directors: John Farrow
  • Writers: David Dodge, Jonathan Latimer
  • Producers: John Wayne, Robert Fellows
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, Collector's Edition, Dolby, Full Screen, NTSC, Special Edition, Subtitled
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Paramount
  • DVD Release Date: June 6, 2006
  • Run Time: 81 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000BDH6CQ
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #192,615 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Plunder of the Sun (Special Collector's Edition)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • The John Wayne Stock Company: Sean McClory
  • On Location with Glenn Ford
  • Batjac Trailer
  • Original Theatrical Trailer
  • Photo Gallery
  • Plundering History
  • -Introduction
  • -The Oaxaca Valley
  • -The Codex
  • -The Ball Court
  • -The Great City of Monte Alban
  • -The Hall of Columns at Mitla

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Plunder of the Sun plays like a low-budget merging of two Bogart classics, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Maltese Falcon. Wiseguy Al Colby (Glenn Ford) finds himself short of funds in Havana, but a mysterious antiquities trader (Francis L. Sullivan, doing his best Sydney Greenstreet) enlists Colby to transport a package from Cuba to Mexico. The package is a piece in a puzzle that could lead to millions in ancient gold, possibly buried in the elaborate ruins of Zapotecan temples--if Colby can survive the other adventurers jockeying to get the stuff. Director John Farrow keeps the story moving and the shadows at a satisfyingly noirish level even if the material never rises to anything like classic status, while Glenn Ford provides a fitting cruel streak for his nobody-makes-a-sucker-out-of-me hero. This was one of two movies Farrow made in Mexico that year for John Wayne's Batjac production company, the other being Hondo. The balled-up plot, international gaggle of eccentric performers (most colorfully Wayne regular Sean McClory), and somewhat chintzy location shooting call to mind another globe-trotting movie of that era, Orson Welles' Mr. Arkadin, and this movie even shares actress Particia Medina with that picture. --Robert Horton

Product Description

A vivid tale of priceless Zapotecan artifacts, deadly deception and sinister treasure-seekers unfolds in Plunder Of The Sun, based on the novel by best-selling author DAVID DODGE (To Catch A Thief). Brought to the screen by JOHN WAYNE’s Batjac production company, GLENN FORD (Gilda, Blackboard Jungle) stars as American insurance adjuster Al Colby, a man who unwittingly becomes involved with a fortune in ancient curios after being asked to carry a mysterious package aboard a ship sailing from Havana to Mexico. Colby’s seemingly innocent mission becomes a dangerous game of pursuit when he discovers that others-including two seductive women (DIANA LYNN, PATRICIA MEDINA) and a double-crossing rogue (SEAN McLORY) – are determined to take possession of the parcel he carries…at any cost. JOHN FARROW (The Big Clock, Hondo) directs this mystery-thriller set amidst the spectacular archaeological ruins of Mitla and Monte Alban near Oaxaca, Mexico.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
Al Colby (Glenn Ford) is a down-on-his-luck guy in Havana, staying in a cheap hotel, drinking in a cheap bar and always waiting for a check in the mail. One afternoon he meets a sultry young woman, Anna Luz (Patricia Medina) who spins a tale for him. He winds up in what he thinks is her home. It turns out to be the home of a very fat, very ill man, Thomas Berrien (Francis L. Sullivan), who describes himself as an "antiquarian." He has a proposition for Colby. Take a small package and bring it into Mexico. They'll meet in Oaxaca, Colby will return the package and Berrien will give him $1,000. Colby is no fool, but he needs the money. Colby agrees, and then finds himself in the middle of a gold hunt for lost Zapotec treasure and having to deal with a group of suspicious and sometimes dangerous hunters who include a ruthless, blond Irishman (Sean McClory), who knows a lot about the Zapotec, an often-drunk young American woman (Diana Lynn) who thinks getting even is almost as good as love, and a respected Mexican Zapotec expert and his son. To make it even more complex, Berrien died of heart failure, probably, on the trip to Mexico. Colby, after he arrives in Oaxaca and opens the package, is smart enough to know that the disc of carved jade and the three pages of mixed Zapotec and Spanish, printed on fragmenting parchment, just might hold the key to more riches Colby has ever dreamed of. And still in the mix is Anna Luz. She is determined to secure the pages and is dealing with obligations she doesn't want to share with Colby.

Plunder of the Sun is an efficient, fast-paced adventure yarn with a believably smart but tough hero in Glenn Ford. All the characters, including Al Colby, have hidden motives and questionable morals.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Film Noir in Striking Daylight July 5, 2006
Format:DVD
PLUNDER OF THE SUN plays much like a movie from the film noir genre with its somber tone and cynical mood. Glenn Ford certainly typifies the film noir hero as Al Colby a disillusioned loner who becomes involved in what appears to be some shady dealings with several mysterious characters and a mysterious package from Havana to Mexico. Glenn Ford plays this character with a gritty realism. During the first third of the film Ford is seen down and out living in a world comprised of stark undercurrents. Director John Farrow however films the rest of the tale in vivid daylight once it shifts from Havana to the bright decks aboard ship en route to sunny Mexico. Yet, Farrow uses vivid light in lieu of dark shadows to create this film noir vision in broad daylight. Essentially this could have been a standard murder adventure mystery but Farrow's approach gives this film a jagged realism with imperfect and vulnerable characters. Farrow's approach raises questions of morality. Is hero Glenn Ford really involved in stealing Mexican artifacts for his own monetary gain at the expense of Mexico's cultural and historical heritage? Ford's fatalistic approach to his character adds to the noir and mystery of this film. Sean McClory gives a brilliant and appealing performance as Jefferson, an enigmatic scoundrel with a bleach blonde crew cut to boot that tries to steal Ford's secret parcel throughout the film. Diana Lynn also gives a very credible performance as a woman of dubious character exuding unrefined sensuality that also vies for Ford's parcel. Read more ›
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not For the Video Game Crowd...Too Complex June 12, 2006
Format:DVD
Within the past year, the old fifties "hard-boiled" noir adventure thriller "Plunder of the Sun" has resurfaced in both of it's media incarnations. The original David Dodge novel has been reprinted and re-issued by the folks at "Hard-Case Crime" and can be gotten through your local literary outlets. "Hard-Case Crime" specializes in bringing back bad-guys-vs-sorta-good- guys-and-maybe good/maybe-bad-gals kinds of stuff...with not a

PROFILER or SERIAL KILLER in SIGHT....a fresh breeze from what normally haunts the paperback racks in the early 21st century...

and they think "Plunder" is worth a read. So do I.

"Plunder" is ALSO back in cinema format in the Wayne-Fellows (later BATJAC) production starring Glenn Ford, Patricia Medina, and Sean McClory. It is shot in glorious, moody, atmospheric black and white, excellently acted, and well directed by John Farrow. This film was one of two shot in Mexico in the same year

by Wayne-Fellows/BATJAC, both directed by Farrow. The other film was the 3-D Technicolor western classic "HONDO".

The intellectually challenged "video-game-as-movie" fanatics will not care one wit for "Plunder of the Sun" . This isn't "Stealth" or "Tomb Raider" or any such "kaboom-kaboom-bam-bam" CGI-propelled FX showcase. This is a STORY, with DIALOG, and with PLOT intricacies and double crosses, and you actually have to use your BRAIN to follow it. No multi-car chases/crashes and only a very FEW gunshots fired!!! And, wonder of wonders!, when a fight occurs its just a good old fashioned fisticuffs kind of fight!!!! Wow! Shazam!!! Nobody is leaping around twenty feet in the air doing somersaults or catching bullets in their bare hands.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
what i expected
Published 12 days ago by staupin
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent archaeology
Great to see if you've just returned from Oaxaca! So interesting to see Monte Alban and Mitla as they were when the movie was filmed.
Published 17 days ago by Dr. Karen E. Bell
5.0 out of 5 stars Plunder of the Sun (Special Collector's Edition)
Love Glenn Ford, who is one of my favorite actors. I try to get all his movies and really enjoy them!! Had this movie on VHS and the recording was deteriorating. Read more
Published 18 months ago by Paula Cherry
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Glenn Ford movie
This is a great drama/thriller with Glenn Ford from the early 50s. This film is filmed in Black&White, Full screen format and runs for about 81mins (1hr 21min). Read more
Published on March 18, 2012 by Rick Lane
4.0 out of 5 stars "Plunder of the Sun (1953) ... Glenn Ford ... John Farrow (Director)...
Warner Bros. Pictures presents "PLUNDER OF THE SUN" (Special Collector's Edition) (1953) (81 min/B&W) -- Starring Glenn Ford, Diana Lynn, Patricia Medina, Francis L. Read more
Published on May 8, 2011 by J. Lovins
4.0 out of 5 stars "Take a good look at yourself! Who'd want to kiss THAT?"
One of the more ambitious titles from John Wayne's Batjac production company, PLUNDER OF THE SUN (based on the book by David Dodge) stars Glenn Ford as an average joe who becomes... Read more
Published on November 30, 2007 by Byron Kolln
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Characters
I'm not one to fall all over A productions at the expense of B films. Too many of the latter type are more entertaining and this film is a good example. Read more
Published on April 14, 2007 by Buster49
4.0 out of 5 stars Greed, Buried Treasure, and Glenn Ford, too!
While much of Glenn Ford's early 1950s film output are unabashedly 'B' movies (he filled the same niche as Robert Mitchum did, at RKO), his movies are, by and large, very... Read more
Published on October 8, 2006 by Benjamin J Burgraff
4.0 out of 5 stars A B rated Maltese Falcon set in Mexico
The late Glenn Ford was known for his stand up roles (Cowboy, Pocketful of Miracles) in most of his films. Here he plays against hero type... Read more
Published on September 20, 2006 by Bennet Pomerantz
3.0 out of 5 stars Only Fair Suspense Thriller but Interesting Location Filming
Just fair movie as a suspense goes but interesting on-site filming in Mexico. The caracters were interesting but the story never delivered the suspense needed.
Published on July 26, 2006 by James M. Gleason
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